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The potters herald. [volume] (East Liverpool, Ohio) 1899-1982, September 21, 1944, Image 2

Image and text provided by Ohio History Connection, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78000533/1944-09-21/ed-1/seq-2/

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PAGE TWO
More than a year ago the AFL aliiii
ates Joined hands to jietltlon the lalkir
board for one bargaining unit covering
the nation, under the name of the
American Federation of Labor.
Hearings on the jietltlon consumedI
A G4 days—the longest iteriod in tlie his
,-tury of the NLRB.
HO Fights Election
“7 The CIO opposition—the American
.Communication^ Association, w li I li
i-epresented the merged Postal coin
'pany employees—has fought against a
^national election at every step. It is
intimated that not more than 4,000
former Postal employees remain in the
Western Union out of almut 17,000 at
’the time of the merger. Messenger
turnover accounts for most of the
ACA’s Iimss.
The election, which may held in
0 geographical areas, in accordance
with the trial examiner’s recommenda
tion, will l»e one of Hie largest ever
held by tlie NLRB, it covers every
state and city of tlie nation, and is ex
jM*cted to Im* conducted by both mail
and iM*rsonal ballot, dei»endlng iqxm
the size of tin* locality.
When the votes are finally countiil,
a 10-year organizing campaign will
finally lie concluded against one of the
largest and most bitter anti-union cor
IHiratlons in tin* country.
lAck Of National Pact Handicap
Collective bargaining was first stnrt
1938, five
the first
'ity liy
nil in Washington, D. in
"I years after the passage of
(RA with its Section 7-A.
city, and district by district,
inercial Telegraphers’ Union
American Federation of Labor steadily
and persistently fought isith the West
ern Union and the AUA, and obtained
certification of every city and district
except Now York, Jietroit, Salt Luke
City and Duluth. &
While agreements have leen iwt|
Ifated, not once but several
jiuiterlal wage Increases have bfetfob
fained, tlie handicap of not living* able
to negotiate on a nation-wide basis lias
always confronted tin* unions when na
tional 1 Mil k ies such as hours, ismsions,
sick benefits, etc., were under dlseus
blon.
"One Union in Western 1’nion” has
Imhi tlie slogan of tlie Anierican^ Fed
eration of Liitior in one of the'most
Intensive and long-drawn-out cam
paigns ever curried on. President Wil
liam Gri*en has given tin* fullret ii»
o|M*ration and iisslstiinre to tlie CTU
and the AFL federal unions, and lias
pledgisl to rontfnui* Ids sup|M*rt until
Victory has l*een achieved.
st-
•V
V
f-c
4
Western Union Telegraph Co.
Workers Await NLRB Order
Which Will Set Election Date
TO SELECT NATIONAL BARGAINING AGENCY
Washington, D. C. (ILNS)—More than 50,000 Western Union
workers in all classifications, from messengers to testing and regu
lating employees, are expecting the National Labor Relations
Board to order an election at any time, to determine whether
AFL’s affiliates or the CIO are to be the national bargaining
agency.
Although the Commercial Telegraphers’ Union and 2 AFL
federal unions have been bargaining on a city-wide and district
?unit basis for 44,000 W’estern Union employees for the last 2 or 3
years, the difficulties of negot ating and policing 75 separate
agreements have long lieen apparent.'
Hie (’om
nnd the
timre,
OBITUARY
ARTHUR R. BLIHIR
Arthur R. Bl«»or, retired Potter, dlisl
Wednesday morning In his
Dresden Avenue, following
ness.
Imine, 7MI
a long 111-
turner by
and s|ient
LI vei| tool,
the Hall
honorary
Mr. Blbor who was a
trade, was born in England
most of his lifetime In East
lie was last employed by
'lilna Company. He held
inemlMiFsIilp In the National Broflier
)iiM*d of (|M*ralive Pullers and was a
inemlier of Kt. Stephen’s Episcopal
'imreh.
lie leaves five sons. Edgar Bloor,
’arl Bloor and Rolwrt Bloor, of Salem,
Harry Bliwir of Midland, and Richard
Bloor of East LIverisMil two Daugh
ters, Mrs. Ada Huff of Rogers, mid
Mrs. Mildri*d Coukle of East Llver
]mm»1 four brothers,
Cleveland, Joseph
and James Bloor,
five sistiTS, Mrs.
Cleveland. Mrs.
Wellsville, Mrs. Itetta Bnsiks of Glen
iiiisir, and Mrs. Lizzie Boice mid Mrs.
Jsittie Grm-ey of East Llverpisd, and
35 grandchildren.
Bert Bloor of
BltM*r, Hay BIimh*
of East Llver|MM*l
Ida Wheatley of
Gladys Lrytla *»f
Services will la* lield Saturday at 2
p. in. In the Martin Funeral Home
Rev. R. K. Caulk, rector of
Ft'-pheti’s Church. Burial will tie
Ri
by
Kt.
In
Shocking Stories
(Continued From Page Ont)
Colonel Barton was dls|*osetl to Im*
arrogant ami refused to tell when* his
campaign fnndn came from, but the
st n.itors tamed him ami he finally
conft's-ed his two boys loosed in some
thing over 65tUM)t apiece in an attempt
to ptirrliaw th*- election. “Dad.” how
ever, lun third and didn't have
chance at the run-oii
n
RACIAL BIAS DTSC’Of KAGE1I
5 Ken tile. Wash. (II.NSi. -A Sealtle
ordinance makes It unlawful to print
or distribute any publication exfwwilng
any individual or any racial or religi
ous group to hatred, utnipt or ridi
cule miles* the publication has the
name and address of the lerson qUv«*
latiiig it ch-arty printed on it.
-as
Manufacturers
(Continued From Pagt Ont)
privileges of tins wage agreement,
ami his right to demand that lie
shall employ or l»e employed at the
rates anti under tlie conditions «|ecl
fied.
1 “2—Both parties to this agreement
1 through their duly authorized repre
sentatives of the conference commit
tee, pledged themselves to ust* every
1 honorable means to enforce the ac
ceptance and observance of this
agreement by all parties affected: to
discourage any opp»sltlon on the
part of Individuals anil to favor in
every reasonable way those em
ployers and employees who faith
1 fully and honorably abide by this
contract in all its provisions.
“3—In case any question nrlSDft,
which cannot lie settled between an
employer and his employees, or rep
resentatives of ids employees, as to
the correct interpretation of any
clause, feature or provision of the
wage agiT'ement, tin* indut shall la*
flrat referred to the pro|er National
(Mlicers of the BrotherhiMMl. In cast*
he and the firm cannot agiw, then
the question shall Im* referred loathe
.Standing Committee. No local shall
assume to settle upon its own author
ity disputes or points of disagree
ment between its members and their
employers, but locals may, of course,
carry such matters up to their Na-^
tional Officers, who in turn may sub
mit them to the Standing Committee,
or to the Labor (kHiunittee, if they
otherwise cannot adjust amicably.
”4—The Intent of the foregoing
resolution Is to express what has
always been understood, and neces
sarily so that questions in dispute
which cannot lie settled lietween
IndNidual firms and their workmen
can only be setth*d by the proper
representatives or couunitLees uf thy
two national laidles.
”5—Any attempt to ignore this
understanding shall be considered an
explicit violation of tlie wage agree
ment, and shall cancel the rigid of
the offending local to participate in
the rights, privileges and wages of
said ugreement.”
The officials of the National Brother
IkmhI of Operative I’otters have at all
times demanded that sulMirdinate local
unions, as well as individual members,
comply with the letter and spirit of
our agreement. We deny, most em
phatically, that we have been guilty of
the charge hurled at us by the nuuiu
tact lifers’ chairman. We particularly
will not accept an imposed contract,
and further state that relations will Im*
riiiitiniied with the Lulled States Pot
ters AsMiH-ialion only on a basis of a
negotiated agn*imeiit and we
res|M*nd to any overlording
js'cson, group or organization.
will not
by any
present
Wind lmp|M*ns when our
wage contract expliw September 3d
is a matter for the membership of the
Brotherhood to determine. As to
whether or not our people will con
tinue to work without at signed agree
ment after Septeinlier 30 will of m*ces
sity Is* submitted in referendum to the
rank mid tile of the m^uuluiUvu for
the final decision.
Tills abrupt ending, causi*d solely l»y
the employers, leaves tlie vacation
will) |Hiy question unsettled, 'i'lie em
ployers definitely ,nre in violation of
the directive order of tin* War ladw»r
Board to embody the one week's vaca
tion with pay into our wage contract.
This governmental tribunal will lie
asked th com|»el tlie employers to carry
out their order, which means (hey
must sit down in conference with the
National BroelierhiNal of Operative
I'otters (’onfereneo. cvuiudUue to t’f
t'ectuide this puriMise.
Furthermore, so long as we are tlie
designated bargaining agent for tin*
majority of tin* employees working in
nil of (lie potteries, tlie nianufnctiiri*s
iiiust comply with the National iaibor
Relations Act and endeavor to nego
tiate a wage agreement mutually con
cluded and not by im|M*sltlon of eitlier
IMirty. We quite naturally will take the
steps necessary for the neforcement of
these federal laws in all tlielr astiects.
Invest in Victory—W |er cent of pay
In War Bonds today.
DOCTOR SHOES
FOR FOOT
COMFORT
Flexible am
rigid arch
styles in ox
fords and
high shoes.
110.00
X-ray Fitting
BENDHEIMS
East Sixth Street
vi'r.-c
^V.' 'f
il.
Re-Manufacture Of
Tanks Taking Place
Thousands Of Damaged
Tanks Being Repaired
Under Program. v
Washington. Re-manufacture of
thousands of damaged tanks is the
major feature of a large scale re
clamation program under which the
Ordnance Department of Army Serv
ice Forces exjieets .to return to active
duty a high proportion
equipment worn out or
battle or in training, the
ment rei*orts.
of ordnance
damaged in
War Depart*
ent back, is
list, both is*-
Tank prt»ductforf,' once
now high on tlie priority
cause of losses in France and liecause
the ojien .terrain of the new battle
fields permit greater use of armor.
The Ordnance Department is plan
ning the re-manufacture of approxi
mately 3,000 M-4 General Sherman
medium tanks and 550 M-5 light tanks
before January. Those 3,550 tanks,
completely rebuilt and in every way
equal to new tanks, will be in addition
to the tanks produced under the in
creased production schedules. All re
cent modifications will be incorporated.
Rebuilding operations are being car
fil’d out by International Harvester
C*orp., Chrysler Motor Co., American
Locomotive Co., and American Car &
Foundry Co., as well as ordnance
dejMits at Chester, Ba. Rock Island.
III. Lima, Ohio Richmond, Calif.
Benicia Arsenal, Calif. Tiw»ele, Utah
Anniston, Ala., and Watervliet Arsenal,
N. Y.
Second major phase of tlie reclama
tion program was establishment of
five new Returned Materiel Centers at
Twin Cities Ordnance I»i*|»ot, Mirme
aiMilis, Minn. Salt Lake City Ord
nance I)e|Ht, Utah St. Louis Ord
nance Depot, Mo. Anniston Ordnance
Ii‘ixrt, Ala. and the Cressona Ord
nance I)e|Mt at Pottsville, Pa.
The centers are d*slgni*d to reclaim
and salvage material returned from
overseas, and to place as much of .this
material as possible back Into Army
stocks. Big monetary savings are ex
|M*cted, and a wide variety of critical
Items and vital parts for complex ma
chines, unobtainable otherwise, will be
made available. Substitution of these
reclaimed items will relieve manufac
turers of some of tlie burden of new
production and release manpower for
other war manufacture, according to
the War Department.
The major jiart of the material
which has passed through the centers
thus far has been salvaged from |Msts,
caippii and station? wi.tijin the nited
States,’ but the flow'of'material from
North Africa, England and the Pacifi .•
Is expected to increase sharply in the
near future.
The renters are processing approxi
mately tons a month. Twin
Cities alone has handled 75 carloads
in the past few weeks, although oper
ating witli only 2M» of the (W workers
it evefitually will require
Labor Praised By
Gen. Eisenhower
Washington, D. C.—One of the most
extraordinary trilaites ever paid to
American labor was broadcast Io
America by Get tern I Dwight 1. Eisen
hower, supreme allied eoinmander in
Europt*.
As the “Battle of France” rntched
its climax and the invasion of Nazi
Germany started, Elsenhower took
lime out for a radii* broadcast to the
workers of this country in which h“
glowingly extolled th? Joh they hail
done to accelerate victory over Hitler's
armies,
“From this battlefrbnt,” lie snltl,
“Americmi fighting troops send their
grateful thanks to the workers of
America for Inivlng math* this the best
equipped fighting force In all history.
"In tliis expression of mr gratitude
we art* Joined by our gallant allies.
The British units include In I heir cate
gory of weapons many which you have
produced. The French divisions ar*
equip|M*d exclusively with Ibe products
of your toil awl skill.
‘‘Each of you Justly shares in the
credit fort he trenientltius successes the
I'nited Nations have gained on this
JjuiMirtnnt. front.”
Elstmhower voiced confidence that
the workers will continue to break
records in production anil that at no
time will tlit'iT* have to Im* a halt in
the pace of the Allied offensive l»ecuus“
of any shortages in ammunition.
“Tlie (Missibility of such a failure on
yoiir part does not even enter Into my
calculations,” lie declared. “My faith
anti belit*f‘ in tlie American fighting
men is etpiallt*i only liy my faitli anti
belief in you who, from your homes,
have sent tht*se men to the battlefrom
to lielp assure that freedom shall pre
vail in the world.”
Martin's service brings
you dependable help in
times of trouble.
MARTIN
Funeral Home.
145 W. Fifth St.
PHONE 365
Ohio and IF. Fa,
Licanooi
*8"
t*i3
THE POTTERS
Will we now let rival ambitions
separate us? Common ambition is
working together toward tlie same goal
—a prize which will be shared. Rival
ambition is striving for a goal
must Im* seized for the benefit
and the detriment of the other.
things of Go.
law.
We
do it
Survey Declares
(Continued From Page Ont)
duction and full employment/
Het urn to the 40- hour w«»k' and
ending of overling after the war will
mean a loss of 12 billion dollars in
workers’ buying imwer. And it is
anticipated that the trend toward
higher prices will carry over into the
|M»st-war period. So we cannot count
on an increase in buying power due to
lower prices.” r'
Then the federation emphasizes that
finless wage rates are raised now,
“workers’ buying jMiwer will be 15 to
20 per cent below the amount nreded
to sup|Hrt full employment and
production.”
'■■’S'
V
HERALd
Our Common
Interests*
.■v
4
•11
By RUTH TAYLOR i
_____ f’
War has brought about the kinship
of common suffering. But when the
war clouds have bdtn swept aside 'and
peace once more reigns on earth, will
there be unity—the same unity as in
time of trouble?
('minion suffering tia*s welded to
gether people of different nationalities
as though they were members of the
same family. Common aims have
bound together people of different
faiths. Common ambitions" have co
ordinated the. actions of people of
different backgrounds.
which
of one
mean?
After ail, what does common
According to the dictionary it is usual,
average, regular, anti jiertatning to or
participated in by all. There must lie
no division either in war or in peace
in a democracy. As Victor (Hander
said, “Tlie foundation of unity is the
equality of status of the citizens.” In
short, if law is to Im* effective it must
be applied always, everywhere and to
all.
We have learned from bitter experi
ence that to be truly free, men must
have the assurance of all alike of an
oplMirtunity to work as free men in
the company of free men. No man can
be confident in peijn’tiiity of his own
safety unless and until every man,
woman and child- is i*qually safe.
if we are to fulfill our duty as
Americans in the trying days ahead,
we must, without setting aside any of
our individual rights, work together
in our community or communal life,
to carry out the/ideals of democracy,
to sei* to it that there are opportunities
for each man to Advance according to
ids talents and liliilitire, to extend a
friendly hand to those who need help,
to keep (lie laws*'which we ourselves
have made. Only^faith behind democ
racy can foster ‘the common virtues
which are necessary for self govern
ment and for the preservation of our
unity.
'enturies
thus:
Look to tin*
Know you are bound to help all who
are wronged,
Bound to coustiwn all who destroy
lie
What else holds, state tq state save
this alone. ,.. .,
lliat each one, hqnvrs the great langt
right.
have done this iu war. We must
in penca
ago lAulpides stated it
full
Record Crowd
'(Continued From fidgt One)
ri’cord l»y a secret ballot vote unani
mously siipiMirting the stand .taken by
tin* conferees.
Two more names were added to tlie
servici* roll, Sister lsalM*lli* Helad and
Brother Edward Mekis. We wisii them
a spiM-dy return. TO. ('. 124.
The decisive days ahead demand
Unit we replace ambiguous general
ities with proiHisalg uf clear and spe
cific meaning.
«,•
Uk
r* Convenient Terms
EXCHAN aS YOUR CASH FOR BONDS OR STAMPS HERB.
"MAKE IT FUN TO STAY AT HOME"
4^*
French Labor
I.
&
(Continued From Page One)
almost nothing by the Nazis French
industrial machinery has aged 20
yeurs during the last four years of
German pressure French luxury
trades have been at a standstill ami
will need reviving.
Among other ixiints made by Sail
lant during the interview were:
Salaries during the occupation went
up about 18 per cent and the cost of
living more than 200 per cent. Salaries
should lie increased immediately by 50
jier cent to meet the worst of this
inequality which is causing real hun
ger among many workers.
Owners and managers who were col
laborationists shojild lie arrested and
tried. He said that there are many in
this class.
Factories engaged in war work,
which means most of .them, should lie
requisitioned, a least for the present
emergency, by the
Government and
stalled to control
administration.
French Provisional
administrators In
profits and direct
should nationalize
The Government
France's mines, electric power, the
chemical Industry, the steel industry,
the insurance companies. The country’s
banks should le strictly controlled by
the Bank of France which should be
nationalized.
Indemnities shbuld lie paid to the
shareholders of these industries In,the
case of collaborationistSj their holdings
should lie apirropriated by the nation.
Holding companies through which
the bulk of French industry was con
trolled by a small group of men should
be broken up.
Urges Unions
"(Continued From Page One)
reft son can lie advanced for compelling
this group to work longer hours than
that which is decided for the working
lieople of America.
"Struggle For Humanity*'
“Tills Is a struggle for humanity
the shorter week is not only to give
every worker an opisirtunity to work
lint also to give every worker an op
iMirtunity to enjoy the fruits of his
labor. Long hours In our industry
benefit only a few hoggish individuals
and work to tlie detriment not only of
all the workers Ln tills industry but to
tlie detriment of labor everywhere.
"I therefore apieal to the members
of the Amalgamated Association to
take advantage of every opportunity
when making new contracts to bring
their hours of labor down to the hours
of labor established by the labor move
ment of our country-r-to tlie 40-hour
week. We are looking to the future—
not the past. We are looking to the
benefit of mankind—not a few indi
viduals.
“It is your duty as organized work
ers to fail In line and I appeal to you
to take up the battle cry with the de
mand of lalsir for the 40-hour week
mid no overtime. Where it is neces
sary to have overt I me—-at
pay for such overtime
tablisliedc
“Reinemlier, we an* struggling for
tin* future—to establish
only for ourselves but for our children
and our children's children.”
least double
should be
es-
conditions not
Trenton O. C. Says
(Continued From Pagt Ont}'
out of the meeting. They stated there
would be nothing definite until after
the Vltrifiwl China manufacturers held
a conference witli the government's
commit tie in Washington.
All members of organized labor who
are old enough to vote and have not
registered should do so at once. It is
everyone’s duty to vote for and elect
labor's friends and defeat its enemies.
(.’lost kilnhand (circular). Bisque
kilnhnnd (circular-open shelf). Clay
tarried (piece work).
SALEM CHINA COMPANY
Phone Salem 4655
Fumiture-Stovesr-Bedding
Linoleum --Curtains
Drapery --Rugs --Carpets
Paiiit ~Appliances
Dinner ana Cooking Ware
CROOK’S
“THE BEST PLACE TO BUY AFTER AIX“
ESTABUSHO) IMO V 4 5'?".
W
A-'
EAST LIVERPOOL OHIO
-fq'/V
Let Small Plants v.
Reconvert Firsts
Chairman Urges
Opinion Expressed By Mav
erick In Bi-Monthly Re
port To Congress -j*
Washington, D. (’. (ILNS).—Maury
Maverick, chairman of the Smaller
War Plants Corporation declares small
plants should Im* permitted to recon
vert prdlnptly to civilian production as
war orders are finished or cancelled,
without waiting for large plants to fill
their contracts.
In a bi-monthly report to Congress,
Maverick said that small plants could
not wait until the larger plants had
finished their war orders before civil
ian production is put under way, and
many would face bankruptcy.”
Maverick said that he had found
little businesses everywhere “worried
about the future.” Their perplexities,
he added, included differences in
freight rates, recent influxes of popu
lation and new industries.
Emphasizing that he favored the re
sumption of civilan production “only
where it does not harm war effort,”
Maverick told Congress that small
businesses were the hardest hit in the
war procurement program, were easier
to convert and that their use of critical
materials was relatively small.
He demank*d that small business
“lie given an equal oportuntty witli
large business' to obtain surplus war
foods and industrial facilities.
Maverick’s position on reconversion
of small plants is substantially that
of the American Federation of Labor,
which lias frequently urged a square
deal for small business in the letting
of war contracts and in the change
over from war to peace production.—-
COMMITTEE BACKS "CAN
YOU SPARE A WORKER"
Washington, D. C. (ILNS)—Formal
ly endorsing tlie “Can You Spare a
Worker” movement, memliers of the
War Manpower Commission Manage
ment-Lalior policy Committee have*
called iqion the organizations they
represent to spread the story of “this
Voluntary joint management labor co
o|oration as an example of genuine
effort to siieed military victory.”
The movement was started ly the
Management-Labor Policy Committee
of Region V, comprising the static of
Ohio, Michigan, and Kentucky, and is
designed to sped up the sldft of men
from less essential work to work in
war plants,
Organizations represented on the
committee are: American Federation
of Lalmr, Congress of Industrial Or
ganizations, railway labor unions,
American Farm Buivau Federation,
National Grange, National Farmers’
Union, United States Chamber .of
Commerce and National Association of
Manufacturers.
If we get down to brass tacks, we
will see that it takes cold cash to win
the hot battles of modem war. Buy
more War Bonds.
T' i'- i
ft.
.W?
4*
-J- V Jr.'
Thursday, Septemlier 21
11)44
1N0TICE!
Important Announcements of Local
Unions are to be found in this
2 Column
4* 4* 4* 4* 4* 4* 4* 4* 4*
4* PACKERS EXTEND 4*
4* 7 INVITATION
NOTICE I AM’AL UNION NO. 29 4*
4^
A fittecial meeting lias Hem 4$
cabled for Tuesday evening, Sep- 4i
tember 26, at 7:30 p. m. Our con
feree to the wage conference will 4*:
make his report at this meeting.
—By Order of the President
4» 4. 4. •41' 4* 4* 4* 4* 4*
4*
4*
SPECIAL MEETING CALLED 4*s
Local Union No. 10 will meet
in special session in the audi
torium on Monday, Se|ffember 25
at 7:30 p. m. to receive the report
of our conferees.
NOTICE
IjOcal Union No. 50, ('iwideii, 4*
N. J. has sus|ended Frank Grasso
for lion-payment of dues.
j, i
USE YOUR-
CREDIT AT
MOSKIN'S
FOR NEW PAU
CLOTHES
FOR THE FAMILY
van W» C!
a K JB Hl Ei Sih
’088
noimr
uiiiiFCdXYr
CREDIT CLOTHING
419 Market Street
A. I. BBOWN, Manager
NEVER
it*
mots suits^
AN EXTRA CHARGE FOP CREDIT
1
oO°'
1
■'. &
1 4*
4* Local Union No. 25 extends an 4*
invitation to ail packers in the 4*
tri-state district to attend a spe- 4*
rial meeting on Thursday, Septem- 4»
her 28. Representatives from 4*
Canonsburg will be present. 4*
&
NOTICE LOCAL UNION NO. 9
Conferees to the wage confer
ence will make their report at our
meeting on Friday evening, Sep
tember 22. Every member is urged
to be present.
—By Order of the President
4,
4
4*
NOTICE
AH members of Loral Union 4**'
No. 131 who fail to attend at least 4»*
one meeting per month will be 4^
fined fifty rents. The last meeting 4»
of each month will he special. 4*
NOTICE LOCAL UNION NO. 21
4-
$**
A special meeting of vital im
portance to every memlier of the
trade has heen called for Monday
evening, September 25, in Room 1.
—By Order of the President
SPECIAL MEETING2 4*
_____ 4»*
All members of Loral Union 4»,J'
No. 18 are requested to attend a 4’i
special meeting to be held on 4»^
Wednesday evening, September 27
in Room 3.
—By Order of the President.
'J*
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4*'
3
4*
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i*
hr ..
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NO DOWN
PAYMENT
n««d«d on
any Homs
selling at
$10 or less
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