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The potters herald. [volume] (East Liverpool, Ohio) 1899-1982, October 19, 1944, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78000533/1944-10-19/ed-1/seq-2/

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PAGE TWO
I
V
I
e
K
A,
ft
K
ft
The entire inemlu’rsliip of the Al'L,
Mr. Woll said, will lie mobilized for
(lie January drive of Hie Free Trude
Union (’oiiiiiiittee. Funds will lie raised
by local unions of the A FL, through
the fund-raising apparatus of Hie La
isir League for Human Rights, which
includes hundreds of local Lalior
League committees all over tlie conn
try, as well ns twenty-two regloii:il
directors. This is Hie same fund-raising
apparatus which in Hie past two years
has helped raise almost $70,000,000
from AFL meinliers for distribution
Hie National War Fund, ('oimuuniiy
'hosts, and Hie American Red Cross
through the I'idled Nations Relief
L’uuuuiltiM* of tlie League.
All Workers
(Continued From Page One)
1
AMERICAN FEDERATION
OF LABOR OPENS DRIVE
TO AID FOREIGN LABOR
rn I TT zw
Matthew Wall Heads Free Trade Union Committee To
Raise $1,000,000 In January Drive To Aid Inde
pendent Democratic Trade Unions Abroad
ft.
i. New York City.—Matthew Woll, vice president of the Ameri
can Federation of Labor, announced the formation of a Free Trade
Union Committee by the Labor League for Human Rights, relief
arm of the AFL, for the purpose of raising a minimum of $1,000,
000 from AFL members during January, 1945, to aid in the re
establishment of independent democratic trade unions in Europe
and South America.
According to the formal statement issued by Mr. Woll, who is
president of the Labor League for Human Rights and will be chair
man of the newly organized committee, this move is an outgrowth
of the American Federation of Labor’s
conviction th nt “without a free trade
union movement, it will lie impossible
to rebuild a democratic Europe.
I*A permanently crushed labor move
indit abroad,” tlie statement declares.
“Vjlll mean that we have failiil to win
thb war of ideas that we have Imhui
lighting against Nazism and Fascism."
Pointing out the probable effects of
such a failure on American lalior,
American Industry, ami the future
jteace of the world, Air. Woll warned
that “forced and impoverished labor
in Europe will lead to the flooding ol
world markets witli cheap commod
ities. It will is’ a threat to American
industry and will inevitably result in
a daii-crotisly lowered standard of
living for American workers. Beyond
ail tills, the existence of forced and
imjKivorlshi’d lalior in Eurojie will set
the stage for violent ••conomlc conflicts
which cannot but lead to a third
world war.”
"The American Federation of Lalior
now constitutes Hu* most |uiwerfiil and
vigorous (h’lws’ratic lalsir organization
in Hie world,” lie continued. "H Is to us
that tlie workers of Eurojs» are looking
for tiie vitally needl’d practical assist
ihice that must lx* forthcoming if their
trade unions are to Is* speedily and
democratically rebuilt,
"In accepting this task, Hie AFL
recognizes that organized workers any
where have a moral right and obliga
tion to assist their fellow workers
everywhere. More Ilian that, it lias
been made evident tlirough Hie tragic
events of tlie past deriule I hat free
trade union movements are tlie strong
est bulwarks of peaceful mid demo
cratic nations, in addition, the restora
tion of Enrols’'* fn« trade Unions will
be Hie most effective way to maintain
easing high living stan^mdM
American workers,^slpee it wilCJiini
nate tin’ ruthh’SH competition rNWitiiig
from oppressed, underpaid, slave or
forced hilsir iibroud.
“Failure to stand by Hie democratic
forces within tl»«‘ European labor
movement in their continuing fight
against all forms of totalitarianism
can inemi Hu1 emi of genuine demoe
racy in Europe for a century to i-ome,
Hie statement concludes,
for-
that yon may have to the less
tuniite in the world. No sign that pledge
rani, give a day’s pay or more."
Final details will lie announced nt
a meeting next Tuesday evening In Hie
Brotherhood aiidltorliiiu when a
(Iona I War Fund representative
address workers on I he need for
cum in the 1944 ap|ival.
Na
will
MIC
Not Retiring From Politics,
Norman Thomas Says
New York ‘lty (ILNS). Norman
Thomas, Socialist candidate for I'resl
dent, denied I he re|HU-i that quoted 1dm
ns retiring from iwilitics. Ig n letter
to national headquarters of Hie Noriai
1st party here, Tlionuis suld lie liiel
U«*n misquoted.
“'I'lie hewn story proeialiiflng
iiileged retirement from |m»||||«?w wh
soiiH'what garbled,” he snl»l. "I merely
fold
again,
el Ire
world,
mo mail can aeclude himself
by retreating 1«* an Ivory tower.
reporter that I would not run
I do nR in the least
froju jHtlltlcH. In a
with so much yet to
intend to
war torn
I*. dolM’,
from Ilf-
DOCTOR SHOES
FOR FOOT
COMFORT
I lexihle andi
.WORKERS UNION,
ii 1 arch
st hsi In ox
ford s and
high shoes.
tie.ee
X-ray Fl Hing
tV
BENDHEIM'S
-East Sixth Street
The data were compiled after (jpo
rlal inquiry by Dodge's Ihdd staff
directed to more tluin 460,0(10 persons
representing city, county, state and
federal government agencies, private
industry, commercial, religious, social,
educational and other organizations,
individual prospective home builders,
operative home builders, architects,
engineers, contractors, insurance com
panies, banks and other institutional
mortgagees. Tin* compilation covers all
stab’s east of the Rocky Mountains
and pertains to projects reported up
to Aug. 31.
School and college buildings, hospital
and
Hie
non-
buildings, manufacturing, loft
office Hui blings and ehurrlies—In
order listed—are the principal
residential classifications re|iorted.
backlog of school and college buildings
alone amounted to $767,I39.(MM), and
all 1 ion-resident la I building to $2,676,
373 (MN).
Other Maeliiuists’ triumphs were
sconil at till’: Shaftle Brothers Ma
chine Company, Middletown, (. Louis
J. Freeman Company, Cincinnati
I ow Chemical Company, Free|Mrt,
Tex., Snap-On Tool Company, Mount
Carmel, 111. Hall Motor Freight, inc.,
Denver: Artis Engineering Company.
Milwaukee, Wis. Motorway, Inc.,
Denver Barco Manufacturing Com
pany, Chicago, and Fiori Pipe Com
puny, St. Louis.
Musicians' Union Declines
To Lift Recording Ban
Cliiciigo (I L.\N).-—Following it meri
ing of Hie executive bon rd of the
Ainerlcnii Koderiitlon of Musicians,
President James ('. Pei fillo telegraph
ed President lliMisevoll that Hie union
could not comply with Ids request to
permit union iiiiihIcIiiiih to make phono
graph recordings for (*oiiiinereiiii use
utileHH Hie recording companies paid
royalties on encii disk into tlie union
I rensiiry.
told the President that 105
and persons have signed
with the union for paying
Pet rillo
companies
i-ontracts
lhe royalties and Hud virtually only
bin coiiipanles, the B’A-Vlctor and
Hie (’olumbla Recording 'oiiqinny have
refused to sign. To iiiiike records for
these two com pan les would Is* unfair
to ihow who have signed, tlie union
head pointed out.
WANTED
FOUR (.LOST kilmiands
Steady Job, daytime work. Apply
LIMOGES (HINA CO.
Sebring, Ohio
/Martin’s service brings
[you dependable help in
times of trouble.
A A'* ’,I
MARTIN
Funeral Home
145 W. Fifth St
PHONE 365
Ohio and IF. Fa,
Licanoe
®S
As
■y
W-
Construction Waits
End Of War Curbs
New York City (ILNS).—The back
log of construction projects awaiting
the relaxation of government controls
and the availability of man |H»wer and
building materials (*xceeds lOMs billion
dollars, it Is reported by F. W. Dodge
Corp., fact-finding organization for tlie
construction industry.
&
ML
’A
z
The
In Hie residential field. Dodge re
ported a backlog of slightly less tlian
a half billion dollars for one-family
dwellings to lie built for owners to
order and by o|ierative builders for
sale or rent. Tlie total or residential
building, including apartment houses,
ilcrmijorles and hotels, was $1,032,
lNlfl.000.
MACHINISTS TRIUMPH
IN TEN ELECTIONS
Washington, D. ('. Keeping up a
liigh Imix score of victories, the Inter
national Association of Maeliiuists
triumphed in ten more National Labor
Relations Board elections.
I'oremost was a Hirasliing adminis
tered by tin* I AM to .the Steel
Workers which attempted a "raid" at
tin’ ('aterplllar Tractor Company, San
Leandro, (’a I if.
AFL Membership
Now At Highest
Peak In History
Nears 7-Miliion Mark With
1,500,000 In Service Not
Included In Total
Washington, D. (ILNS).—Ameri
can Federation of Lalior membership
now stands at tlie highi’st point Ln its
64-year ^listory, AFL Secretary-Treas
urer George Meany announced here.
Tlie total dues-jiaid membership of
tlie federation as of August 31, Hie
close of Hie AFL’s fiscal year, was
6,806,013. 'I’liis represents 11 net gain
of 242,772 over the August figure of
1943, when Hie total was 6,564,141.
Steady Growth Reported
Mcnny emphasized that tlie memlier
sliip figure does not include more than
1,500.000 AFL memlM’rs now serving
in tlie armed forces.
“The late of increase in membership
lias declined from tlie 1941-1943 period
during which remarkable organization
gains were scored qs Hie sco|ie of
industry was expanded,” Meany
•da red.F
Must Chart Course
(Continued From Page One)
security. But advocates of Jolts for all
rely on public niadi’ work to perform
the magic. Public owned and controlled
production tin' represented as unde
sirable unless and until chaos at»
pioaches.
At a Joint Central Lalior union meet
ing of Cambridge and Zanesville dele
gates, action was taken to withhold
the support of organized lalior from
Roliert A. Taft and I*. W. Griffiths,
candidates for Senator and Repre
sentative from this district.—O. C. 122.
Effective Housing
(Ctnlinufd ront Page One)
‘Tost-war housing can give* power
fiil impetus to jobs and prosperity in
our cities and towns-* if we do the Job
right.”
ESTABLISHED 1880
■-W-
ft Q-
wn
ch­
gg
fed-
•‘Neverilieiess file gni^Ri of the
('ration lias been steady and gratifying.
We hope and expect Hint our total
membership will top tlie
mark l»y tlie Huie our annual conven
tion op'iis in New Orleans Nov. 20."
million
Detailed membership figures, giving
Hie dues-paid totals of each affiliated
national and international union, will
be included in Secretary Meany’s finan
cial report to (lie convention, which is
an ollirial and audited document avail
able to public inspection. ,f
THE POTTERS HERALD
I
I
ft
__
tflAGWAVHL
v Sings the same old
song of discord. Wraps
himself in the Stars
and Stripes to fool his
audience—figuring we
won’t see .what’s be
hind him.
•■r
MHT LISTEN TO HIM!
High Court Rules
100% For Victims
Of Rail Accidents
All Verdicts For Workers Or
Families In Lower Tri
bunals Are Upheld
Railroad workers and tlieif* families
came through with a 1(M) per cent
btitling average in death and injury
cases passed tlfloil by tlie Supreme
Court this week, when it handed down
Hie first. Iiateh of orders since aliening
its fall session,
a
44 In four instances when* lowpr courts
ilnd sustained the workers’ claims, the
high court made tlie victory final by
reji’cting appeals from tlie carriers.
On the oilier hand, in two case* where
railnien lost in lower courts, tlie tri
banal agreed to review the decisions,
thus ojieiiiiig Hie way to ultimate tri
umph by Hie workers.
in two of the eases Hie issue liefore
Hie court was xy&Mher railroads can
use Hu* war as g/-inokescreen for de
priving widows of rail workers of tlie
right to sek’c.t tribunal in which
they w|h»t to suoE ft-,,
Rafeed Juris®ti*ft| QuestftW
Tin’ i nion was. Involved.
Widows of two former I'. I’, brakemen
-Harold 1’. Utterback and Alfred M.
Thatcher, who were kilh’d in an acci
dent in Hie road's? yards at Portland,
(reg. chose to bring suit in Cali
fornia. Mrs. I’licrbaek asked
damages and Airs. Thatcher, $50,lM)0.
Tiie carrier applied for injunctions
in Oregon court- to stop Hie Ciilifornia
litigation on Hie claim that it would
hnv’ to transport witnesses to the
Golden State, mid that tlie war effort
would be impaired while these wit
nesses were absent from their railroad
Surprisingly, a lower court granted
the Injunctions on that plea, but it was
reversed by tlie state Supreme (’ourl.
Ir. I’, attorneys then appalled to tlie
I’. S. Supreme Court, but were turned
down.
wwi
Dinner and Cooking Ware
Convenient Terms
exchange your cash for bon
■Jh*..,
iHiiMi«im»MiiiiyMHflwiiinniwironmaiM3iii»
“FERGIE" KIND SAYS
Now Is the Time
to Buy Cool
PHONES:
Office 934 Home 693
KIND COAL CO
a Railroad & Bollock Streets
ir
Furniture—Stoves—Bedding
Linoleum Curtains
Drapery Rugs Carpets
Paint-Appliances
Ob
CROOK’S
“THE BEST PLACE TO BUY AFTER ALL”
4R
or stamps here.
EAST LIVERPOOL, OHIO
ft
Playing Of Power
Politics Leading
To 3rd World War
Socialist Candidate Forsees
Stalin Dominant In
Post-war Period
’ft:
Louisville, Ky. (ILNS). "Phony
internationalism.” and a bungling for
eign policy is leading directly to a
third world war, said Norman Thomas,
Socialist candidate for President, at
a mass meeting here. He predicted that
Stalin would emerge as the dominant
power in the post-war world.
The jieace of Hie world lays in the
hands of three men, Stalin, Churchill
and Roosevelt, said Thomas, of whom
"only Stalin and Churchill know
exactly what they want." Botii of them
an* totally committed to the aggrand
izement of their own countries and are
relying on Hie old way of power
l»oli.tles which has always failed. Some
Americans will accept this statement
regarding Churchill and the British
Empire but hotly deny it of Stalin.
Other Americans will do the exact
opposite witli equal vehemence. On the
record ls»th Stalin and Churchill are
playing the same sort of power poll
tics game. 1
Says Stalin Presents Challenge
In Italy, Allied bungling has turned
Hie Italians toward Russia. And in
Europe, generally, Stalin is emerging
as the dominant figure. "He will con
ciliate most of tlie Balkan peoples lie
has already given Rumania, long an
enemy of tlie Allies, better terms than
lie will give tlie Poles, in whose be
half this war was ostensibly begun.
"It looks as if he deliberately let tiie
bravest of the non-Communist Polish
patriots die without supplies from him
in Warsaw to simplify ids problem of
ultimate Polish control. He had pre
viously killed scores of Polish Social
ists leaders, the best known of whom
were Ehrlich and Alter. If Roosevelt
made any protest or proposed any
alternative plans for Poland he was
unsuccessful. And Roosevelt together
witli Churchill apparently threw the
Finns whose cause they had so passion
ately and justly esiHiused in
tlie Russian wolves without
qualm or protest. A crushed
pendent Finland will be.tlie
to all of Scandanavia.”
it 40 to
outward
and de
gateway
BRITISH TO BUILD
MANY NEW HOMES
.LornIon, England. As part of its
reconversion program, the British
government proposes ta build 4,(MM,(MM)
modern iiotbps ,h Iomn-ravaged Eng
laqd withfcJ&^ars aftir the
1 ng stops.
In making the iTrirtonhcemont, Thohias
Johnston, secretary of state for Scot
land, said tliat applications are on
hand for Hie construction of 221,(MX)
temporary houses.
(Political Advertisement)
PHILLIPS
Candidate for
RE-ELECTION
COURT of APPEALS
Judicial Ballot
HELP!
GIVE YOUR CAR
Wartime
Attention
LET US FIX UP YOUR
CAR NOWI
Enjoy a smooth running
engine! Enjoy the quiet
power! Let our trained men
recondition your car.
Save gasoline and oil and
increase your car’s life. Do
it now and bring your
car troubles to
RAY
BIRCH
Service Garage
"Established June, 1913”
Broadway at Sixth St.
PHONE 190
ill v.
Britain Offered
•New Security Plan
British Government Lowers
Benefits Proposed In
Beveridge Plan
The British government recently sub
mitted to Parliament for consideration
a White Paper in which a new social
security plan -is outlined. ThiSg is a
direct result of the British govern
merit's promise, made at the time Sir
William Beveridge published ids
famous social security plan, that it
would in due course present a plan of
its own based on Sir William's “cradle
to-t tie-grave’ ’idea of social security.
The government’s plan is not quite
so generous as the Beveridge scheme.
Some categories of benefits are lower
than those proposed by Beveridge, and
the duration of benefits is limited in
some instances ’where it is unlimited
in the Beveridge plan. But the govern
ment’s plan still offers incomparably
greater coverage as to risks and bene
ficiaries than the existing American
system. All employees when unem
ployed will get benefits for thirty
weeks, and training benefits there
after. All families witli more than one
child will receive family allowances
without any means test. There will be
fret? medical care for the entire popu
lation and, in addition, all employees
will receive weekly sick benefits.
Mothers will get ample maternity bene
fits. Men retiring at the age of 65 and
women at the age of 60 will receive
old-age benefits, and survivors of
breadwinners will get widows’ and
orphans’ benefits.
SHIP OUTPUT AGAIN GAINS
Washington, D. C, (ILNS).—Ameri
can shipworkers continued their re­
markable production record in Septem
ber, output rising over August. Sixty
five of the 124 vessels deli vert’d were
of the faster ty|»e on which emphasis
is now being placed. Thirty-four of Hm
faster ships wen* built for tlie Army
and Navy in merchant yards, some
being the assault vessels which Secre
tary of the Navy Forrestal recently
described as tlie most urgent item op
the production program.
at
4.
ft
Judge Elmer T.
.J
12”
ON CREDIT
Fashions that ora "just
like mothar's.” Real valuos.
Thursday, Octoln'r If), 1944
O TICJE
a
29’5
OVERCOATS
oJlf $1-25 A WBfK
ON 5...
MO CHAXOX W* M’*"*
GIRL'S PRETTY
COATS
CREDIT CLOTHING
419 Market Street
s A. J. BROWN, Manager
NO EXTRA CHARGE FOR
15 lU-jip"
£.f\''
4^
Important Announcements of Local
Unions are to be found in this
Column,
”-*4- 7 ‘■t, x- 'x 11
i'
NOTICE
All members of Local Union 59
are requested to be present at our
next regular meeting on October
30, to vote on question of petition
ing for a referendum vote of the
trade, asking repeal of the law
passed at the last convention,
providing for an increase in sal
aries of our national officials.
4’4’4 'iF4’4’4’4’4’4’4’4’4,'4’4’4’4*
4*
4’4*'4’4’4’4,'4’4’4’4’4’4’4’4’4’4’4’
NOTICE
Red Cross Dome Nursing classes
will start Monday, October 23.
classes will be held on Monday,
Wednesday ami Thursday eve
nings front 7:60 to 9:00 at tlie
Mary Patterson Memorial Home,
East Fourth St. All women inter
ested may register at Red Cross
Headquarters, phone 4141.
4* 4^ 4* 4* 4* 4* 4* 4* 4*' 41, 4* 4* 4* 4*
A
414’4’4’4*4’4’4’4’4’
4» 4* 4» 4* 4*
NOTICK
Sebring, Ohio—Local Union 121
has suspended the following mem
bers for non-payment of dues:
Delores Wright, Anne Taylor,
Edna Martin, Jennie Speed, Le
Anna Riggs, Esta Efaw, Eliza
beth Tadis, Ethel Flickinger, Vir
ginia Thompson and Joe Shields.

YOU GET PLENTY OF
CREDIT
COATS
Ne*
Fine f«bnc».«
Rich color*
Luxury fur*
Kt .di lvie$
Economy prio*
E«sie*t term*
.. or A WEEK
att«r
BOYS’ STURDY
COATS
14”
JON CREDIT
WiH five a lot of comfort
E IT
$
4*
4* 4* 4* 4* 4* 4* 4* 4* 41' 4* 4* 4* 4* 4* ’F
NOTICE PACKERS 4*
Local Union 25 will hold a social
following their next regular meet
ing on Thursday evening, October
26. Every member is urged to be
present and join in the fun.
4’4’4’4’4’4’4’4’4’4’4’4’4’4’4’4*
Ask for Union Labeled merchandise.
Ch
74
1
i
w
ft
*ft-
1
ft.
w
71
I
NO DOWN
PAYMENT
needed «n
any items
selling afr
$10 or lessk
for each.
7
tfk-i

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