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The potters herald. [volume] (East Liverpool, Ohio) 1899-1982, December 14, 1944, Image 2

Image and text provided by Ohio History Connection, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78000533/1944-12-14/ed-1/seq-2/

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5
i
MS':
Urgent Need For 50,000
Housing Units In Heavy
War Productiori Centers
SITUATION IS EXTREMELY CRITICAL,
NHA ADMINISTRATOR DISCLOSES OPEN
ING HOMES FOR WORKERS NECESSARY
Washington, D. C. (ILNS).—Criticallly-needed housing for
ordnance, shipyard and railroad workers in a score or more of
heavy war industry centers as well as in numerous scattered com
munities, including many along transcontinental freight lines,
represents the most pressing job of the National Housing Agency,
Administrator John B. Blandford, Jr., said here.
With more than 1,730,000 units for the exclusive use of war
workers completed since the start of the emergency and another
81 800 under construction, an urgent need for an additional 50,000
accommodations has developed to permit recruitment of necessary
■workers and to keep present workers*-
on the job.
s Opening Of Homes Asked
The situation is comparable to the
one which arose last April through a
shift in the demand by the armed
forces for different types of equip
ment and ammunition.
“New construction, however, is not
all that is necessary,” Blandford de
clared. “Our 107 war housing centers
report that, on the average, there are
3 applications for housing for every
existing unit that is listed for war
workerss’ use.
“New stress must be laid on the
necessity for citizens in scores of
communities to open their homes tp
the workers needed to keep our war
plants operating at capacity.”
The need for housing has been met
in most war production areas, Bland
ford said, but added that does not
alter the fact that the situation cur
rently is “extremely critical” in such
widely separated places as New Bern,
N. C. Camden, Ark. Eau Claire,
Wis. Great Bend, Kan. Flagstaff,
Ariz. Fairbanks, Alaska Tulsa,
Okla. Bremerton, Wash., as well as
in such larger centers as San Fran
cisco, Los Angeles, Seattle, Chicago,
Detroit, Cleveland, Dayton, O., and
Springfield, 111. jv
35,000 Units Programmed^
Of the approximate 50,000 units for
which there is an immediate urgent
need, about 35,000 have been pro
grammed by the NHA but have not
been placed under construction while
the other 15,000 are required to meet
specific needs in 87 different locali
ties. Construction of these 15,000 has
pot as yet been authorized.
Hearing Raises
Question Of Law
For Hiring Vets
Washington, D. C. (ILNS).—-Legis
lation requiring private industry to
employ disabled veterans was sug»
gested at a hearing before a House
Labor subcommittee investigating
means of helping disabled #verker^,
K. Vernon Banta, War M^powfr
Commission employment specialist,
told the subcommittee, headed by Rep.
Augustine B. Kelley of Pennsylvania
that there was no way to enforce
preference for a disabled veteran
seeking private employment, although
he is given preferential treatment
for employment in the federal gov
ernment.
Banta pointed out that England has
a law requiring employers to give a
minimum of from fi to 10 per cent of
their jobs to disabled persons. He
added that similar legislation was be
ing considered in Canada, but that he
favored further trial of the voluntary
method for promoting employment of
disabled persons in this country.
Rep. Stephen A. Day, of Illinois,
who had questioned Banta on prefer
ence for the disabled, commented,
however, that “it looks like wo will
have to have some legislation here.”
Despite the high employment of
handicapped persons during the cur
rent manpower shortage, Banta and
A. F. Hinrichs, Labor Department
Commissioner of Labor Statistics,
agreud that it would be difficult for
many of these persons to keep their
jobs after the war, when the labor
market will not be so “tight” and
even more difficult to place newly
disabled men.
Committee Hears
$ (Continued From Page Ont)
State as well as Federal appropna
tuins diould be increased, she de
clared, estimating that $20,000,000, or
five times the present Federal appro
priation, could be used profitably
every year.
Lack of special educational facili
ties required by the handicapped
young-ter’a was stressed by John W.
Studebaker, commissioner of the U.
S. office of Education, who pointed
out that there is no Federal aid along
this Ime and that the few state pro
grams reach only about 8 per cent of
the children.
Adults Also Suffer
That adults are faring little better
was apparent from the testimony of
Michael J. Shortley, director of the
Office of V i» al iunal Rehabilitation.
There ia a “backlog” of more than
a million and a half persons under
the program for medical treatment
and job training and
disabled is increasing
about 2rO,O0O a year,
of
of
the number
at
he
an
the rate
said.
increase
from the
in
He al argued for
funds,
purely monetary point of view it Is
justified, by the spectacular gn?ns In
the earning puwer of individuals who
have rcuhed
contending that 'Jki/n
vocational training.
Car Porters Back
Free Trade Body
New York City (ILNS)—A request
to President Roosevelt to label as
“must” legislation the Scanlon-Daw
son-LaFollette bill for a permanent
Fair Employment Practice Commis
sion was made by the Workers De
fense League, national non-partisan
defense agency of the labor move
ment.
The League’s national chairman,
Rev. Aron S. Gilmartin, wired the
President saying: “Permanent Fair
Employment Practice bill now before
House Rules Committee deserves the
full weight of your Administration
behind it. We respectfully urge that
you declare the Scanlon-Dawson-La
Follette bill ‘must’ legislation for im
mediate passage without amendment
as to coverage or enforcement powers.
Such a forthright message on perma
nent FEPC bill would be hailed
over the world.”
The Senate committee wonders
whether cigarette manufacturers may
not have taken a leaf out of the tex
tile manufacturers’ book.
WWW
ail
Cig" Shortage
(Continued From Page Ont)
cigarette manufacturers “ganged up”
and descended in force on the Office
of Price Administration to press a
demand for a price increase.
Curious Coincidence
The OPA refused to yield, contend
ing that manufacturers’ profits were
already higher than could be justi
fied. The manufacturers were also re
minded that they had been protected
by a price ceiling on leaf tobacco and
by the wage “freeze.”
It is significant that shortly after
the OPA had rendered its decision
the cigarette shortage began to de
velop. Whether there is any connec
tion between the two incidents
matter the Senate committee
carefully examine.
is a
will
OPA officials pointed out the simi
larity between the cigarette shortage
and a shortage
for men, women
of low-cost clothing
and children.
manufacturers were
price increases from
When textile
unable to obtain
the OPA they sinaply refused to pro
duce textiles.
on
It's a safe bet, the Senators are
the right trail.
Solons Really
(Continued From Page Ont)
in factories supplying material—and
they will be created when they
be most needed.
will
Pensions For Widows
and
bill
Without debate, the Senate
House passed the first pension
for World War 1 widows and orphans.
Benefits range up to $74 monthly and
will cost $37,000,000 during the first
year of operation.
The bill provides a basic rate of
$35 monthly for widows, $45 for a
widow with one child, and $5 for each
additional child. Orphan benefits
start at $18 and range up to $36 for
three orphans, plus $4 for each addi
tional child.
Approval of the legislation is an
other proof that things do not always
work out as Congress plans.
During the last World War the
Wilson administration put through a
bill establishing an entirely new
method of dealing with veterans and
their dependents.
It carried a generous insurance
provision and other features more
liberal than had ever been proposed
before.
The theory was that by making
ample provision for the nation’s de
fenders during war time there would
be no demand for pension legislation
later. It was a poor guess.
WEATHER-PROOF
Foliage
WREATHS
FOR GRAVES
Supply Limited. Make Selec
tions Early.
I S a
C*-«p»r«tiav with av»nun«nt suagM
ti«a. ear st«M la cloaad oa SwMaya.
AFL LEADERS REELECTED—President William Green (right), unani
mously reelected for his 21st term to head the AFL, listens to the acceptance
speech of Secretary-Trasurer George Meany, who was reelected together with
13 vice presidents at the close of the AFL convention in New Orleans.
(Federated Pictures)—
What Do You
Know For Sure?
By RUTH TAYLOR
“Do you know it for sure?” Re
member that phrase from your child
hood—and how important is was? It
differentiated between the things we
glibly said or repeated and those
things which we knew from actual
first hand knowledge.
I wish we needn’t have let polite
ness cause us to drop the phrase as
we grew up. I wish it were still pos
sible to say “Do you know it for
sure?” to those people who are so
prompt and definite about every and
all situations.
Yes—I admit it—I’ve been listen
ing to the radio again. But I’ve also
been reading columnists and modern
essayists—and I’ve been listening to
people talk on trains, in busses, in
restaurants and homes! And it’s been
all I could do to keep from saying
“Do you know it for sure?”
There are the people who know all
about when the war will be over, and
what Eisenhower’s plans are and
where the State Department is wrong
and what is going to happen a week
from next Tuesday. (The Gestapo
smiles on them.
There are the people who know all
the motives back of everyone’s ac
tions, w’ho tell you glibly just what
self-interest prompts each act, who
must have X-ray minds, for they see
what goes on before it happens.
(Goebbel’s friends they are.)
There are the people who know all
the bad news, who can and do talk of
the cost of battles, the mistakes of
commanders, the waste in lives, dol
lars and supplies, who can tell all the
details of the chaos to follow. (Goer
ing finds them useful.)
There are the perdple who sow dis
sension by setting group against
groups, exaggerating Labor’s short
comings, pouncing on Industry’s mis
deeds accusing the fanner of selfish
ness, stirring up racial and religious
hatreds by rank generalizations,
judging the group by the sins of
apostate members, preaching anti
Catholicism and anti-Semitism whole
sale (Her Hitler has a special deco
ration for these.)
There are the people who talk too
freely, who boast of how they “got
around” regulations, who try to out
wit the censor, who brag of “inside
knowledge,” who tell of production,
troop movements, ship sailings, be
traying their own for the chance of
appearing smart. (The bells ring in
Berlin over the deaths they cause.)
To all of them—to you—to myself
—I say, “Do you know it for sure?”
^SUPPORT FOR F1NNLSH~LABOR
Stockholm (ILNS).—Finnish labor
can count on economic and moral sup
port from Sweden, says August Lind
berg, president of the Swedish Fed
eration of Labor, who has just re
turned from a visit to Finland. He
added that it is only natural that the
Swedes should take the initiative in
resuming such cooperation. ___
a-.'..-
VI. f- V*
PO Ruling Held
Senous Threat ,,
To Labor Press’
New Orleans (ILNS).—The labor
press faces a new threat to its exist
ence from the Post Office Department
of the United States.
Editors of labor weeklies meeting
in New Orleans in connection with
the annual convention of the AFL re
ported that local postmasters, par
ticularly in the South, are threaten
ing to deprive labor weeklies of sec
ond class mailing privileges. Com
plaints were made by editors from
Georgia, Florida, Oklahoma and
Alabama that local postmasters have
informed them that, under the rul
ing of the Third Assistant Postmaster
General, group subscriptions cannot
be counted as bona fide subscriptions.
In certain capes the postmasters
are said to require a signed statement
from each recipient that he desires to
have the labor weekly mailed to him.
If labor weeklies are not permitted
to count the block subscriptions which
local unions take out for all their
members as part of the privileges of
a dues-paying member, many week
lies would not be able to muster
enough subscriptions to qualify for
second-class mailing privileges. They
would either be forced out of exist
ence or the cost of individual sub
scriptions would greatly handicap
them.
The standing-committee of the In
ternational Labor, Press of America
has asked for signed statements from
labor editors in order to fight this
threat to the labor press. ...
... ..y..........
Locals Urged
4
.(Continued From PngK One)
Trada ./Union, depend upon
wages and other conditions in a par
ticular craft or industry, but many
international unions have ^com
mended sums of 25c, 50c, 75c or $l.C0,
or more from individual members.
Local unions 'may turn collected
funds over to Central Bodies or their
own international unions, depending
on advices from these organizations.
However, collections may be sent
directly to the Free Trade Union
Fund, care of Labor League for Hu
man Rights, 10 East 40th St., New
York, 16, N. Y. Acknowledgement by
receipt will be made of all contribu
tions.
Drapery Rugs Carpets
Paint—Appliances^
Dinner ana Cookmg Ware
EXCHANGE YOUR CASH FOR BONDS OR STAMPS HERE.
DOCTOR SHOES
FOR FOOT
COMFORT
Flexible and
rigid arch
styles tu ox
fords and
high shoe*
$10.00
X-ray Fitting
Furniture—Stoves-Bedding
Linoleum Curtains
CROOK’S:
“THE BEST PLACE TO BUY AFTER ALL”,
1
BENDHEIM’S
Photo Engravers
Keep In Touch U
On Improvements
Better Illustrations
In Post-War Period
New York City (ILNS). Union
photo-engravers are ready to tackle
the job of producing better illustra
tions in the post-war period by
black and white, color or rotogravure
—Edward J. Volz, president of the
International Photo-Engravers Union
of North America, told Editor & Pub
lisher in an interview on the occasion
of the 50th anniversary of New York
Local No. 1.
Through their own Bureau of Tech
nical Research, the 1,800 07 so union
engravers employed in newspaper
shops have been keeping up to date
on methods which will come into
greater vogue after the war, President
Volz said. Given the finer qualities
of newsprint to work with, he added,
the engravers will prove their ability
to get the most out of copy.
The IPEU, Volz said, is proud of
its long record of harmonious rela
tions with newspaper publishers.
Over the last 20 yearp he could recall
only one “serious” disturbance a
strike lasting 2 days. And in his an
nual report, delivered in booklet form
recently after the August convention
had been canceled, Volz listed: “Strike
and lockout benefits during the past
year—$110.” ...
Local No. 1 of tire IPEU was
founded as a unit of the International
Typographical Union, but withdrew
in 1894 and became independent. Six
years later, the IPEU was formed
with locals in the U. S. and Canada.
Volz was president of No.
years. He was elected head
15 years ago and Edward F. White
succeeded him in No. 1.
.1
■^3
'3.
East Sixth Street 7
... ’.’-'ft
EAST
i
.•A- sht
1 for 13
of IPEU
Benjamin Franklin advised young
men not to le too much influenced by
a pretty face in picking a wife or girl
friend. Straw votes among service men
recently as to what they prefer in a
girl listed “understanding, conversa
tional ability, poise, and neatness
at MOSKIN'S
WEEK1
After
Down
fOi
MEN WOMEN
•0*»
to
SUITS
TOPCOATS
OVERCOATS
«297S
dtt,r si.w
a
wm
STURDY SUITS.
WARM O’COATS
MACKINAWS..
A special order of business
has been called for our next
meeting on December 19, to dis
cuss the Question of initiating a
referendum to have Section 75
restored to the Constitution in
its entirety. /j
Printing Trades
Hl*
Local Union Notices
John DeLohg, President1
Samuel Jolly, Vice President
Harry F. McCombs, Fin. Sec.
J. R. Manson, Rec. Sec. 4»
(Continued From Pagt One)
years it has fought unionism with
such weapons as injunctions, yellow
dog contracts, espionage, intimida
tion and discrimination. Donnelley
print Time, Life, Reader’s Digest and
Pathfinder, catalogs for Montgomery
Ward and other mail-order houses,
and scores of telephone directories.
It is the largest non-union printing
plant in the world, with the possible
exception of Axis-dominated Europe.
The Donnelley unionization effort
is coordinated by the Organization
Committee of Chicago Printing
Trades Unions, whose executive sec
retary is N. M. Di Pietro and whose
offices are at 608 S. Dearborn Street,
Chicago 5, Illinois.
Ask for Union Labeled merchandise.
-i 7 IMMEDIATELY
sl
f» r'
PHONE 720
BUYS PRACTICAL
GIFTS
and
CLOTHES
CHILDREN
*•’2.
*10.95
14.95
^9.95t
SWEATERS *4.75 SLACKS *5.75
•n CREDIT
-J*
A VL' ’’A a 1 i
NOTICE SAGGERMAKERS NOTICE LOCAL UNION 172
♦*. k Discussion on matters of im
portance to our trade and nomi
4 nation of officers will be held at
our meeting on December 22...
—By Order of President.
LOCAL UNION NO. 195
All members of Local Union
195 are urged to attend regular
meeting Wednesday evening, ♦1'
December 20. Election of officers.
LOCAL UNION NO. 130
4* 10fficers will be elected at our
4* next meeting on Friday, Decern
Ar ber 22. Every member is urged
4* to be present.
You get $4 back for every $3 you
Invest in War Bonds.
COOK WANTED
•^WANTED^-.'.^
One Ware Turner for Vitrified
China. Phone or write the Jackson
Vitrified China Co., Falls Creek, Pa.
A.'
Reference Required Apply In Mornings
K i MISS BURRELL 7 4r
jEast Liverpool City Hospital
Availability Statement Required
FUR TRIMMED
COATS ’29?
SMART SPORT
COATS »225
uL
REW WOUOAT
GALXMRtf
DRESSES'lG?
-J..
&KT 4
WiWT
J* j,
GIRLS’WARM i
COATS *12?
aftr ii.m 4 wok
RESSESI’2”
REDIT CLOTHING
419 Market Street
NEVER A CHARGE FOR CREDIT
Jj.
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fwfflw-r
'J
Li
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7 ifS.S
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