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The potters herald. [volume] (East Liverpool, Ohio) 1899-1982, March 22, 1945, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78000533/1945-03-22/ed-1/seq-5/

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Thursday, March 22, 1945
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NO MONEY
DOWN
needed on items
selling to $10 ea.
Senator, Congressmen And
Other Leaders In Alabama,
Ask Poll Tax Repeal
v TAX HIT AS “INDEFENSIBLE
W’hy Not Repeal in 1915?
“Many Alabama teachers are not
voters because they have not had the
spare money for their poll tax
since the removal of the tax will come
in Alabama sooner or later, why
should it not be in 1945? Big move
ments, like tides, have a way of com
ing on irresistibly. The granting of
Suffrage to the common man has
been such a movement. Let Alabama
teachers add their voices to call on
the 1945 legislature for favorable ac
tion.”
Washington, D. C.(ILNS).—With Georgia no longer requir
ing payment of a poll tax, Alabama becomes leader among the 7
remaining poll tax states in amount to which a poll tax can accu
mulate, the National Committee to Abolish the Poll Tax points
out- Alabama’s poll tax is cumulative to $35.
Many forces in Alabama are now speaking out for state repea
of the poll tax. .7
Senator Lister Hill, in Washington, has issued a statemenl
advocating outright repeal of the $1.50 annual levy. He describee
Alabama s poll tax as the most burdensome, restrictive, indefen-
Alabama’s poll tax as the most
sible and undemocratic” of any in
the South. He pointed out that while
a state constitutional amendment re
cently exempted World War II vet
erans from poll tax payments, the
mother of a soldier overseas still has
to pay to vote for the sort of country
her son will come back to.
Three of Alabama’s 9 rfouse mem
bers in Washington have already
agreed with Senator Hill that the
state legislature should act. Repre
sentatives Patrick of Birmingham,
Sparkman of Hifntsville, ahd Rains of
Gadsden told reporters they favored
state repeal.
Latest Alabama group to speak out
for state action is the Birmingham
Teachers Association which said in
its current bulletin:
“■Although the revenue received
from the poll tax goes to education
in Alabama, the oligarchic practice
should no longer be allowed to stifle
the achievement for which education
exists—freedom to act wisely. It will
mean more to education *in Alabama
to have the citizens we have trained
take part in the settling of political
questions than to receive the’ pittance
from the tax and then see the vital
matters of the state decided by only
10 to 30 percent of the people, many
of whom have been prodded by politi
cal leaders to dig up the price of the
tax.
It must however,’ be' noted that
MOSKIN’S
ACLU OFFERS TO TEST
EXCLUSION OF LOYAL
JAPANESE AMERICANS
New York City (ILNS).—Loyal
Japanese Americans who have been
excluded from the West Coast by
Army orders have been offered a
free court test of their exclusion by
the American Civil Liberties Union.
The ACLU said it had become “pain
fully evident that the military auth
orities on the west coast have issued
individual exclusion orders against a
great many American citizens of
Japanese ancestry who are by no
reasonable test disloyal, and who
were cleared by the War Relocation
Authority after FBI investigation.”
The union specified that it would
defend only Japanese Americans who
have not applied for expatriation or
repatriation and who indicated their
loyalty on the questionnaire filled out
by all the evacuees.
The ACLU said that several cases
challenging the individual exclusion
orders are pending in the Southern
California federal courts, “but these
few cases are not enough to establish
a rule applicable to a wide variety of
persons.” It was noted that some
Japanese Americans resident in other
parts of the United States have
been ordered excluded from the west
coast although they never lived there.
The City of Happiness is located in
one’s state of mind.
state repeal in Alabama has a long
row to hoe. Since the poll tax is
written into the Constitution, a con
stitutional amendment will be needed
to repeal it. Constitutional amend
ments require 3/5ths of the House
and Senate votes and a majority of
the qualified electors at the next
succeeding general or special election.
A WEEK
offer regular down payment
BUYS NEW
FOR THE ENTIRE
FAMILY
©W
&
CREDIT COSTS
y/4S
iCREDIT
419 MARKET STREET
.. A. J. BROWN, Manager.
YOU NOTHING EXTRA HERE
tL
trials. The
called folic
largely un
not as yet
humans but
Tiny doses of the substances were
injected daily for four to six weeks
into the veins of 89 mice that had
spontaneous breast cancers. The can
cers disappeared completely in 38 of
the mice, and 49 of the total number
are still living. In the 60 cancerous
mice that did not get the vitamin no
tumor disappeared. Among these 14
developed new tumors and only 20
are living. Only one new tumor was
observed among the mice.
The difficulties in applyingthis
test to human beings are that only
minute quantities of this substance
are now available and since its struc
ture is not yet known it cannot be
manufactured synthetically. Natural
sources yield something like one part
of vitamin from 100,000 parts of
source material. But one has only to
remember the discouragingly minute
quantities of 'radium Madam Curie
was able to extract from overwhelm
ing amounts of source material to
know that this difficulty in time will
be overcome, if the substance. will
cure human cancer. At any rate, it is
interesting to note that these same
researchers during the past seven
years have found anti-cancer activity
in a number of extracts from spleen,
yeast and barley.
Reduction In The Use Of Sweets
A Vital Necessity
Even in these days of sugar ration
ing, the excessive use of sugar and
candy still confronts our population
as a serious food and health problem.
As is now commonly known, though
not sufficiently practiced, sweets do
not form an essential item in our
diet. They are purified extracts high
in calories but possessing few other
virtues. Filling up on sweets leaves
little appetite or room for other vital
ly needed protective foods.
The office of the Quartermaster
has recently developed a new ration
consisting of a package of fudge,
3:
A
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K
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CLOTHING
1043 Penna. Ave.


3?
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Helmut Dantine listens warily to Nazi voices as Andrea King at
to advise him in the above scene from Warners’ “Hotel Berlin,”
Ceramic Theater starting Sunday. The film also stars Faye Emerson
Lorre and Raymond Massey.
PAYMENTS ON YOUR HOME
TOO HIGH
Perhaps we can help you adjust your financial
affairs to fit wartime conditions by refinancing
your^ old-fashioned mortgage, let us explain
our monthly-reducing home mortgage loan—
THE POTTERS kERALb
OPENS SUNDAY AT CERAMIC
NUTRITION AND LABOR
New Vitamin May Have Anti-Cancer Activity
An active field of medical research
at the present time is the study of
cancer, which took a toll of approxi
mately 165,000 lives in the United
States in 1942, the year for which
complete figures are available. Dis
covery that one of the new vita
mins may have anti-cancer activity is
now-j-eported by four researchers of
Mount Sinai Hospital. The discovery
was made in studies with mice that
ideal laboratory animal which can act
as a model for human
vitamin used has been
acid though it is still a
known substance. It has
been applied to cancer in
the group hopes, of course, that the
discovery will turn out to be sug
gestive in the study of human cancer.
that brings you to free-and-dear home owner-,
ship in the shortest time. ..
FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS & LOAN
ASSOCIATION
IN THE EAST END
OFFICERS—
T. H. Fisher, President W. E. Dunlap, Vice President
A. L. White, Secretary-Treasurer
K
«mpts
it the
Peter
gum chocolate, creams, licorice and
chocolate-coated peanuts which en
able fliers to add 5000 feet without
an oxygen mask to their normal fly
ing fatigue. Moreover, the contents
is so packed that the various items
fall in the flyer’s mouth from a con
tainer which can be mainipulated
with one mitten-covered hand.
(More articles to follow)
FLORIDA DAILY BACKS
ANTI-PEONAGE FIGHT
Miami (ILNS).—The Miami Daily
News has championed the rights of
Negro workers, some of them A FL
longshoremen, who it is alleged, have
been the victims of mass arrests and
have been fined without trials at the
hands of Sheriff Walter Clark at
nearby Fort Lauderdale.
Chiding a federal grand jury which
recently failed to indict anyone for
the mass arrests which the Workers
Defense League exposed, the News
editorially suggested that a new
grand jury hear the cases:
“It is too bad that the federal
grand jury was unable or unwilling
to administer a permanent check to
the application of'the opposite policy
in Fort Lauderdal. The cases should
not be allowed to rest. It will not
do to condone injustice.”
The paper, owned by former Ohio
Governor James M. Cox, declared that
failure to indict was “dangerous lax
ity,” and pointed out “the fact that
only Negroes were caught up in the
vagrancy dragnet, that these Negroes
were denied their day in court, and
that the provably innocent were pun
ished with the guilty. And that just
isn’t justice under the American Con
stitution and the laws of Florida.”
Almost any motorist will gladly
give a woman driver half the road
if he can. find out which half she
wants.
service brings
I you dependable help in
I times of trouble.
MARTIN
Funeral Home
145 W. Fifth St
PHONE 340
Ohio and IF. La.
Licence
io:
y.


K
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i
Main 201
’♦X'
3
Stirring Stories 1
fCtntiuued Frtm Ptff Ou)
of hate and greed for power. Many
have fallen victims to the unleashed
fury of those who hate the u-.oral
standards that a Christian democracy
demands of its leaders and people.
Fifteen years hard labor was the
Gestapo sentence on Fredrik Ramm,
one of Norway’s foremost editors and
leader of MRA, who stuck to his
guns when the Nazis over-ran h’s
country. His utterly fearless articles
on the great heroes of Norway,
stressing their Christian faith as th?
basis of true democracy, so inspired
his people that Quisling raged
against MRA, and declared that the
whole soul of Norway has been
poisoned by it.
After being forced to work on the
Hamburg docks under the bombs of
the RAF, he was later subjected to
solitary confinement for his adamant
refusal to make munitions for the
Nazis.
“After three years of suffering he
is now dead—of double pneumonia
the Germans said”, was the con.rr.«nt
of tftc Hon. Carl J. Hambro, Presi
dent of the Norwegian Parliament.
“It is one
tion used in concentration camps.”
While the Norwegian Foreign Min
ister said,
Ramm will go down in history as one
of Norway’s greatest heroes. He re
fused to abandon any of his prin
ciples after the German occupation.”
of the methods of execu-
“When the truth is told
In Holland, too, the Nazi# outlawed
Moral Re-Armament and tried in vain
to suppress its work. Pirn van Doorn,
a yotfhg MRA worker was shot by the
Nazis for a daring attempt to
smuggle out for Allied use the plans
of German-held airfields in Holland.
In Denmark, many of the people
who had attacked Frank Buchman
and the principles of MRA, were
among the first to go over to the
Nazis. As in Norway, traitors like
Quisling, the former Communist turn
ed Nazi, who put their own safety
and interests before their country’s,
opposed MRA and collaborated with
the enemy.
STATE AID CONSTITUTIONAL
Sacramento (ILNS). California’s
supreme court has approved the con
stitutionality of legislation which ap
propriates $10,000 for state aid to
local governments for development of
public works programs. The money
will, be allocated to communities on a
matching basis.
FOR PRESIDENT
(Vote for One)
DUFFY, JAMES M. (Turner)
Local Union No. 76
WHIPPLER, NORMAN (Liner)
FOR SECRETARY-TREASURER
(Vote for One)
BOSTOCK, ARTHUR (Dishmakcr)
SALSBERRY, GEORGE (Jiggerman)
Local Union No. 24 ...... Wellsville, Ohio
FOR FIRST VICE PRESIDENT
(Vote for One)
HALL, LUTHER (Jiggerman)
Local Union No. 12 East Liverpool, Ohio
WHEATLEY, E. L. (Kilnman)
Local Union No. 9... East Liverpool, Ohio
FOR SECOND VICE PRESIDENT
(Vote for One)
HULL FRANK (Decorating
'W'
Kilnman)
Local Union No. 121 East Liverpool, Ohio
FOR THIRD VICE PRESIDENT
(Vote /or One)
DALE, OSCAR (Kilnman)
Local Union No. 76
LAWTON, SAM (Turner)
Locaf Union No. 24
SLAVEN, JAMES (Decorator)
Buffalo, N. Y.
.Wellsville, Ohio
Local Union No. 124 East Liverpool, Ohio
FOR FOURTH VICE PRESIDENT
(Vote for One)
ZIMMER, CHARLES (Sanitary Caster)
Local Union No. 45 ...... Trenton, N. J.
FOR FIFTH VICE PRESIDENT
(Vote for One)
BAKER, ALBERT (Liner)
Local Union No. 35 Trenton, N. J.
NEWBON, GEORGE H. (Kilnman)
Local Union No.
35
NEWELL, DAVID J. (Kilnman)
35
Local Union No.
Trenton, N. J.
..Trenton, N. J.
YOUNG, ALEX (Jiggerman)
Local Union No. 184 .^ Trenton, N. J.
FOR SIXTH VICE PRESIDENT
(Vote for One)
CAMPBELL, FRANK (Jiggerman)
Local Union No. 122 _.Cambridge, Ohio
TURNER, GEORGE (Caster)
Local Union No. 4 East Liverpool, Ohio
Need Of Supplies "For Men
Fighting Overseas Never
Greater/ Says Patterson i -j
REQUIREMENTS 29% HIGHER FOR 1945
Washington, D. C. (ILNS).—In a radio broadcast to Detroit,
one of the country’s vital arsenals, Undersecretary of War Robert
P. Patterson recently emphasized that men overseas have never
needed the products of Arm rican wo i s as they need them now.
“I give you my word that war production is still, right now,
the most urgent, the most important job on the home front,” the
War Department official said.
The Undersecretary reminded war workers that 2 months
ago, when the German drive into Belgium took place, none thought
of stopping Mtork. Whenever news gets better, he added, the er
roneous idea circulates that work#
stoppages may do no great harm.*
Actually, Patterson pointed out,
Army requirements for 1945 are 20
percent higher than the word pro
duction of 1944. This, the War De
partment has admitted, will place a
heavy load on labor and industry
throughout the year. Especially urg
ent ds are for more tanks, guns,
ammunition, tires, trucks, aircraft
and cotton duck.
“In war only one thing matters,”
he continued, “and that is keeping
up the flow or production to the
fight mg fronts and delivering the
goods on time. The finest tank in
the world is of qo use delivered to
a dead the day after battle.”
In conclusion, Patterson stated,
“We’re fighting a hard, bitter and
costly war. It will be soon, but it is
not won yet. The winning of it is the
first and foremost job for everyone
in this nation. Our men fight with all
they have. It is unthinkable that we
give them less than all we can.
»*EyesHours:Fitted
OPTOMETRIST
Buffalo, N. Y.
Local Union No. 124 East Liverpool, Ohio
Local Union No. 29 East Liverpool, Ohio
JORDAN, CHARLES F. (Kilnman)
Local Union No. 59 .Sebring, Ohio
McGILLIVRAY, JOHN (Handler)
Local Union No. 10 East Liverpool, Ohio
Examined
•Glasses
Office 9 to 5
Evenings 7 to 9 By
Appointment
502 Market Street
Over Peoples Drug Store
PHONE: 2378 Office—2264-R, Res.
SAMPLE BALLOT
The following is a replica of the official sample ballot for primary election of National
Officers and Delegates to the American Federation of Labor convention, which in accordance
with law, must be printed in each issue of the Potters Herald during the entire voting period
of the primary election.
7^..
Local Union No. 124 East Liverpool,
FOR EIGHTH VICE PRESIDENT
(Vote for One)
CHADWICK, JOSHUA (Jiggerman)
Local Union No. 12 East Liverpool,
JIVIDEN, FLOYD (Kilnfireman)
Local Union No. 130 East Liverpool,
PRUETT, CLYDE E. (Kilnman)
Local Union No. 201 Huntington Park, Calif.
STAHL, THOMAS C. (Dipper)
Local Union No. 59.
Local Union No. 103
Local Union No. 70 ........
EDG AR, EDM ARD C. (Caster)
Local Union No. 4 East Liverpool, Ohio
GREEN, JAMES (Jiggerman)
Local Union No. 51 Canonsburg, Pa.
GOLDEN, ROBERT (Sanitary Caster)
Local Union No. 89 Richmond, Calif.
HAWKE, SYLVESTER (Kilnman)
Local Union No. 5 Evansville, Ind.
HALL, LUTHER (Jiggerman)
Local I nion No. 12 East Liverpool, Ohio
KILL1NGER, DAN (Jiggerman)
Local Union No. 122.. Cambridge, Ohio
MOSSER, A. R. (Jiggerman)
Local Union No. 165 El Cerrito, Calif.
RAWLINGS, LIFFORD (Dish Jiggerman)
Local Union No. 51 .......Canonsburg, Pa.
SILLLMAN, LEWIS (Turner)
Local Union No. 10 East Liverpool, Ohio
TORRENUE, ERNEST A. (Jiggerman)
Local Union ^’o. 12 East Liverpool, Ohio
WEIGAND, LEWIS (Jiggerman)
Local Union No. 183 Los Angeles, Calif.
PAGE FIVE
VACATION PLAN REJECTED
Washington, D. C. (ILNS).—With
labor members dissenting, the Na
tional War Labor Board has declined
to approve a vacation plan of 1 week
wit:, pa after 6 months service and
2 weeks after a year of service for
all 44,000 office, store, plant and
warehouse employees proposed by the
Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co., New
York City.
WU7
LOCAL LOANS
We have funds available for
loans to farmers and business men
of this community.
You will find our requirements
only such as you would sp~—’y if
you were the lender.
We welcome your loan business.
The First National
East Liverpool’s Oldest Bank
Member F. D. C,
Phone 914
FOR SEVENTH VICE PRESIDENT
(Vote for One)
ARMSTRONG, E. C. (Decorating Kilnman)
Local Union No. 124 East Liverpool,
BENNETT, HARRY J. (Jiggerman)
Local Union No. 12 East Liverpool, I
DESMOND, T. J. (Dipper)
Local Union No. 70
Local Union No. 4 East Liverpool,
HAMILTON, JOHN W. (Jiggerman)
Local Union No. 44 .. Sebring,
NEWTON, (HARLES E. (Glazemaker)
Local Union No. 59 ...... Sebring,
PODEWELS, HARRY L. (Jiggerman)
Local Union No. 12 East Liverpool,
WILLIAMS, HAROLD (Liner)
1
W"
gg
Ohio
Ohio
3’
Ohio
..Minerva,
DALES, FRANK C. (Caster)
Local Union No. 4 .. East Liverpool,
GLYNN, FRED J. (Caster)
Ohio
Ohio
Ohio
Ohio
Ohio
Ohio
Ohio
Ohio
..Sebring, Ohio
DELEGATES TO A. F. L. CONVENTION
(Vote for Two)
BRUC E, HENRY L. (Turner)
Erwin, Tenn.
BROADBENT, ROY (Kilnman)
Local Union No. 9 East Liverpool, Ohio
COBB. HARLES M. (Jiggerman)
Local Union No. IOS Bedford, Ohio
CURRAN, MATTHEW (Kilnman)
Local Union No. 9 ... .East Liverpool, Ohio»
DALE, OSCAR (Kilnman)
Local Union No. 76
Buffalo, N. Y.
DUFFY, FRANK (Turner)
Local Union No. 10 East Liverpool, Ohio
EDWARDS, ABE ((aster)
Minerva, Ohio
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