OCR Interpretation


The potters herald. [volume] (East Liverpool, Ohio) 1899-1982, November 01, 1945, Image 2

Image and text provided by Ohio History Connection, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78000533/1945-11-01/ed-1/seq-2/

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PAGE TWO
ft
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I
1
ft A convincing plea for edditional
United States financial support of the
United Nations Relief and Rehabilita
tion Administration (UNRRA) is
made by the American Federation of
I
Labor in its curren monthly survey.
The AFL shows beyond a doubt the
desperate need in Europe of help from
this and other nations and urges Con
gress to act at once to provide our
share of UNRRA funds.'
.Under thei nternational agreement
which set it up, UNRRA’s funds are
provided by the 31 member nations
which were not invaded, the AFL
points out. Each has pledged itself to
give 1 percent of its 1943 national in
come as a first contribution to meet
the needs of invaded nations which
cannot borrow to finance their own
relief. XXft /.v.
Virtually all of the relief adminis
tration’s first contribution has been
collected from all 31 nations, except
that the U. S. has thus far paid only
two-thirds of its share. Our share is
In any event..«
FLOWERS
ALWAYS!
Flowers have a way of convey
ing your message where words
fail you. s
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Comment On World EyfRte'
Here’s One
Chat That
Just Suits
You
are fitted to your income. I
want, after all, by dropping
Payments
home you
home ownership chat.
B%
$1,350 million, all of which has been
authorized by Congress, but $550 mil
lion of this sum has not yet been ap
propriated. Without this money
UNRRA cannot buy the supplies it
must get now to feed its
Europe and Asia the next
This will meet UNRRA’s
1945 only.
Annual Rate of Interest With
Principal and Interest Reduced Monthly
CiRST FEDERAL
.1
a
SAVINGS
LOAN ASSOCIATION
IN IMF EAS1 END
.1032 PENNA. AVE. MAIN 204
ArriArnc T. H. Fisher, Pres., W. E. Donlsp,
UrriUlLKO Vice Pres., A. L. White, Sec’y-Tress.
i
people in
2 months,
needs for
For 1946, UNRRA will need a Sec
ond contribution, equal to the first
from each of its 31 subscribing na
tions. From us it wil need at least
$500 million by December, 1945 and
another installment early next year
to meet food needs for the first 3
months of 1946. These will be the
months of lowest ebb for the devas
tated nations. Congress must be ready
to meet these additional payments if
food is to reach these nations in time.
After 1946 in Europe and spring of
1947 in Asia, the UNRRA
should be able to meet their
mands.
nations
own de-
to pro­
Americtn labor can help
vide and speed the needed help, the
AFL emphasizes.
“Your union can help in 2 ways,”
the federation explains. “First let
your Congressman and Senators know
that lavor wants adequate funds ap
propriated for UNRRA—$550 million
at once, and more later as needed.
Secondly, contribute clothing you can
spare to the colh*ction boxes in your
plant and eleswhere. Relief agencies
cannot get enough clothing. Garments
for women and children are especially
needed also warm winter clothes.”
Sowing the imperative need of quick
aid for Europe, the AFL declares that
“untold suffering from hunger, cold,
sickness, and even starvation faces
Europe’s liberated millions this winter
unless we act at once to send them
help. The situation is worse than at
any other time in centuries.
“Coal and other fuels are desper-
ft
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8
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8

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So you CAN have that
In to our office for a
A blrect deduction Home Loan Is conVeMeht at welt as eco
nomical payments cover principal, Interest. And it’s flex
ible prepayments are encouraged! Call on ue tor quick
service.
usm 'lima »»a a tMi»ft«ft« w urn w i
Why Labor Should Be Represented On The
East Liverpool School Board
I East Liverpool Public Schools need the goodwill and cooperation of labor in
finding solutions for its problems.
Three-fourths of all children attending the East Liverpool Public Schools are
the children of working people That being true, is there any good reason why
representatives of Labor should not be chosen to fill the two places on the School
Board to be voted for on the Non-Partisan ticket on November 6. If your answer
be “NO”, then cast your vote on election day for
JAMES B. MOSS and
GEORGE SALSBERRY
for the (wo vacancies on the Board and give Labor representation in school affairs.
(PoHUcul AJvertiMtiMnt)
I
l-
CORNERS SOUVENIR
hunting was set by Ewell E.
of Local B-34, International
Convention Plans
Membership Spurt
Chicago (FP).—A drive to double
its membership in 18 months was ap
proved by the Building Service Em
ployes International Union (AFL) at
its convention here. ■,ft
The delegates unanimously reelected
President William L. McFetridge, Sec
retary Treasurer, Willian H. Cooper
and six vice-presidents. New vice
presidents are John Goodman, secre
tary-treasurer of New York Local 44,
and Charles C. Levy of Pittsburgh.
Anti-administration forces led by
President David Sullivan of Local
32-B, New York, did not put up any
candidates. Sullivan’s group met a set
back at the opening session when a
rank-and-file delegation from Local
32-B was seated with voting power
equal to the Sullivan delegation. The
rank-and-file workers had accused Sul
livan of using trickery in the elec
tion of delegates.
Unionization Brings Raise
In Pay For Toy Workers
Minneasota (ILNS).—Valasco Toy
Co., workers are enjoying their first
union contract together with a general
wage increase running from 5 to 10
cents an hour.
Raising earnings hi one of the low
est-paid industries in this area, the
contract was negotiated by Local
Union 1859, Upholsterers’ Internation
al Union, following organization of
the employes by UIU Organizer Rob
ert Hawn and Local 1859 Business
Representative Ray Perleberg.
-ft—"-
ately needed to heat homes and keep
industry going at the minimum neces
sary to sustain life. The serious
shortage of clothing will intensify suf
fering from the cold.
“Housing is pitifully inadequate. In
horn bed cities there is practically no
window glass to keep out the cold.
People are living in cellars, pack
ing boxes, shacks or crowded into a
single room. Faced with such cold
and exposure, people will be subject
to sickness and epidemics unless they
can get adequate food.”
The picture of the situation painted
by the AFL lends emphasis to the re
cent appeal of Herbert H. Lehman,
director general of the UNRRA in
which he warned that additional funds
for the organization are absolutely
essential if starvation and chaos are
to be avoided in Europt* and Asia.
Try the New Betsy Ross
Enriched Sandwich Bread
GODDARD BAKERS
Trades ah'A Ijibor Campaign Publicity Committee
AMES H. (iltAFTON, Chairman
MARKET—Some kind
.y
-a t
.XL ft X.
THE POTTERS HERALD
MARKET Some kind of record for souvenir
Davis, discharged master sergeant and member
Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (AFL), in
Peoria, Ill. All his trophies have a story, he says, but the one he likes best
is about the discharge button he got in U. S. (Federated Pictures).
To AFL Council
Rft-
__
Dubinsky Elected
Ij
Cincinnati, O. (FP).—The AFL ex
ecutive council unanimously elected
President David Dubinsky of the In
iernational Ladies Garment Workers
Union to fill a council vacancy created
by the death of President Edward
Flore of the Hotel and Restaurant
Employes International Alliance.
A member of the council from 1994
to 1936, Dubinsgy was expelled along
with others who helped form the CIO.
Although he had been a leading con
tender for a council seat since his re
turn to the AFL in 1940, Dubinsky’s
election came as a surprise to those
who had expressed to see the seat go
to John L. Lewis as the condition for
his bringing the United Mine Workers
back into the federation.
AFL Will Oppose
(Continued Front Page One)
was entering the conference in the
hope of “making it a success,” Green
said, but he added he refused to be
overoptimistic about what it might
achieve.
Unanimous endorsement of the
council was given to the Wagner post
war housing bill, which would encour
age a nationwide construction drive
and create millions of new jobs. Adop
tion of the bill, the council said, “is of
utmost national urgency and can
longer be deferred.”
no
of
The Union Label is tl\e emblem
industrial democracy.
IMOSK1NS
credit*
WINTER COATS
fyueniLf Oh^JUt!
...........
i|A Meiity
■V Dowel
Skew
ftclldoy
MESSES
OBITUARY
PATRICK F. QUINN
Patrick F. Quinn, aged 74, one of
the oldest active members of the Na
tional Brotherhood of Operative Pot
ters, was found dead Monday night
in his home in Sebring, Ohio.
Mr. Quinn was born in Linetown,
Washington township,
county, but had made his home in
Sebring for the past 45 years. He Was
well known throughout the trade and
his sudden death will be a shock to
ft- T-s’W
his many friends.
29”
Why welt another
minute for your new 1
COAT it’s here
on terms as tow as
1.25 a week
O’COATS
& SUITS
29”
Elected by men who
know style and
value! And you'll like
the low price, tool
MEN'S LEATHER
&
wool irSfl
JACKETS 10
ONE
■account
POR ALL!
Columbiana
Despite his advanced age, Mr.
Quinn who was a mouldmaker by
trade worked up until the time of his
death. He Was an employee of the
Limoges China Company and affiliat
ed with Local Union No. 44, National
Brotherhood of Operative Potters.
The body was found by his brother
in-law, Harold Hughes. Mr. Quinn had
arranged to make his home with his
son, Leland, at East Palestine and the
Hughes family planned to move into
his home. a
Besides Ms son, ne leaves two sis
ters, Mrs. Martha Newland and Miss
Anna Quinn of East Liverpool, and
two grandchildren. His wife, Mrs.
Elizabeth Quinn, died in 1938.
Burial was in Fairmount Memorial
park at Alliance.
JOHN MULLEN
former
John “Jack” Mullen, 67, z
East Liverpool potter, died October 23
at his home in Nutter Fort, W. Va.,
following a long illness.
The deceased was a handler by
trade and was employed until his
illness at the D. E. McNicol Pottery
Co., in Clarksburg. He was affiliated
with Local Union No. 99, National
Brotherhood of Operative Potters.
He leaves his widow, Mrs. Viola
Mullen three daughters, Edna Mul
len, Phillis Mullen and Patrica Mul
len, all of Nutter Fort two sons, Wil
liam Mullen of Nutter Fort, and Sgt.
Jack Mullen, a paratrooper who is in
an army hospital convalescing from
WANTED
2-ExperiefiCed Liners
for Hotel China
Apply or Write
WALLACE CHINA CO., LTD.
5600 South Soto St.
Vernon 11, Calif.
Attention: Kenneth O. Wood
Construction In
East Continues
Upward Trend
New York City (ILNS).—Construc
tion volume in the 37 states east of
the Rocky Mountains continued to
mount in September. Outlays for con
struction involved in contracts award
ed during the month were 5 percent
above August and 58 percent above
September of last year, according to
tabulations of individual project con
tracts reported by F. W, Dodge Cor
poration.
Nonresidential construction featured
the month’s activity, with substantial
gains over thep revious month and
over the corresponding month of last
year. Ninety-fivel percent of the non
residential awaifls were fey private
acounts, only $8,511,000 of 'a total of
$181,033,000 being classified as pub
licly-owned.
The September record for private
nonresidential construction continued
to sharpen the trend from publicly
owned projects characteristic of the
war years, a spokesman for the Dodge
Corporation said. The record for the
first 9 months of this year shows 57
percent of all nonresidential construc
tion was for private Recounts com
pared with only 25 percent during the
corresponding year of 1944.
Residential construction in Septem
ber continued at the August level
with a total of $42,580,000.
wounds suffered in Germany, and
three brothers, Arch Mullen and Steve
Mullen of East Liverpool, and Pete
Mullen of Miami, Fla.
WANTED
Experienced tool filer for Vitrified
China plant making both dinner
and hotel ware. Give age, exper
ience and references. Box 752, East
Liverpool, Ohio.
$
ft
QI
BOYS
14»
41? Market Street
A. J. BROWN, Manner
$
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ton
SUITS
11’5
ic
j.i i*'A. V Isft
v'•!(/• 7 4 v\.‘ "A ft'
Thursday, November 1, 1945
¥uAFL
CROOK’S
THE BEST PLACE TO BUY AFTER ALL"
ESTABLISHED 1880 EAST LIVERPOOL OHIO
She's the kind
of woman most
men want
Council
/Continued From Page One)
to pay per capita taxes were contain
ed in a report to the membership by
Brown which appeared in the April,
1945 issue of the Machinists Monthly
Journal.
Rehearsing the step-by-step de
velopment of the long-standing dis
pute, Brown’s report charged that the
jurisdiction which had originally be
longed to the machinists was granted
to the carpenters in 1938 after Presi
dent William Hutcheson warned the
council he would stop paying per
capita taxes. ...
The International Ladies’ Garment
Workers Union has won a bargaining
election conducted at the Carolina
Maid Company, Granite Quary, N. C.
Well Pull With You
We feel that in each banking
transaction whether it be ac
cepting the deposit of a customer
or extending a personal loan
we are not merely serving one in
dividual, but helping to set in mo
tion a chain of events which will
add to the productivity, andL wealth
of our entire community.
The First Notional
East Liverpool's Oldest Bank
Member F. D. C.
Phone 914
Furniture-Stoves-Bedding
Linoleum Curtains
Drapery Rugs Carpets
Paint—Appliances•,'*’’*i'
Dinner and Cooking Wccre
Convenient Terms
EXCHANGE YOUR GASH FOR BONDS OR STAMPS HERE
ft^' -n-':
CERAMIC
One Week Starting Thurs.. Nov. 8
■k
BUTT mi MHK SMI Stt MO!
1*.
r'g'T/'
EVE ARDEN ANN BLYTH BRUCE BENNETT
directed by rwoouceo
MICHAEL CURTIZ JERRY WALD
MMM MAY RMML0 BMCOOMhU. MSEC ON TWC NOVCL SV JAMU M. CAIN MUSIC SY MAX MKINtt
ADDED FEATURES-
I Have Only Eyes For Yon-------- News of the Day
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