OCR Interpretation


The potters herald. [volume] (East Liverpool, Ohio) 1899-1982, November 01, 1945, Image 3

Image and text provided by Ohio History Connection, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78000533/1945-11-01/ed-1/seq-3/

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Tliursdayi NovcmW 1, 1915
I Upholsterers To Profit
From $10,000 ‘Dividend’
In Union Membership-'
Business Agent Frank Lange re
ports the container workers enthusias
tic over the “profit” from their in
vestment in unionism.
’We desire to serve our
community in the beat
(possible manner in
the best way we know.
MARTIN
Funeral Home
145 W. Fifth St.
PHONE 365
Ohio and W. Fa.
Li cent*
rou
IS
7 ,* I'
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''Political Advertisement)
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Committees On
Mining To Meet
Soon In London
118
Up
will
Dubuque, la. (ILNS). The
members of Ixx:al Union, 1861,
holsterers’ International Union .....
split a $10,000 dividend on their union
membership this year as the result of
contract negotiations with the Dubu
que Container Co.
The new agreement lifts minimum
!i? rates from 2*4 to 5 cents an hour and
maximum rates from 2^ to 10 cents
an hour. In addition, numerous “mer
it” increases were negotiated through
out the plants.
It was also decided that each coun
try’s delegation would comprise 6
members 2 representatives each
from government, management, labor.
The ILO announced that the inter
national organizations of trade unions
in the coal mining and transport in
dustries’will be invited to send repre
sentatives to the London meeting. The
primary function of the committee at
these first meetings will be to facili
tate tfh exchange of views between
labor, management and government
on the problems of the industries.
In addition the governing body de
cided to hold meetings in Brussels
next year of committees for the tex
tile, building, civil engineering and
public works industries. It may be re
called that it was decided by the gov
erning body of the ILO at its 94th
session in London last January to set
up committees for 7 pain industries,
the others being petroleurti production
and refining, iron and steel produc
tion, and metal trades.
ELECT
Frank E Grosshans
FOR
JUDGE
Municipal
Court
SB#
CHARTER
CAN CHARTER A VALLEY MOTOR BUS AT
A REASONABLE PRICE
Tl e next time your business, so- tice. Only the best equipment is
cial or church club has a meeting used for this service.
or an outing, why not go to and Clean, modern, safe buses driven
from your meeting place togethei capabie courteous operators
on a chartered Valley Motor bus. ma^e yOur trip a most enjoy
With a chartered bus you can be a|)je one ^nd the chartered bus is
certain of keeping your group to- yours exclusively to go and come
gether, you will enjoy each oth- when you piease
er’s company longer and be freed
of the bother of driving a number Charges for Valley Motor chart
of private automobiles. ered buses are based on mileage
and the length of time you will re
Valley Motor chartered bus ser- quire the bus. They are so reason
vice is available day or night and able that a bus can be chartered
can be arranged for on short no- at a small cost.
Valley Motor Transit Co.
-tost-./
V
-i'if -Ji' jh'kt,
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1
Paris (ILNS). International tri
partite industrial committees for coal
mining and inland transport set up by
the International Labor Organization
will meet for the first time in London
in December. This was decided by the
governing body of the International
Labor Office which met in Paris prior
to the opening of the International
Labor Conference here Oct. 15.
A
Post-War Living
By SUSAN ALEXANDER^??
Federated Press
DO WE WANT SNYDERV1LLES?—
Two girls were dragged off to jail
recently for pitching a tent on Bos
ton Common, veterans have been de
manding the right to build shacks for
their families in Central Park in New
York, hundreds of frantic appeals for
apartments—any size, anywhere, any
price—fill the classified ads.
Those are symptoms of the worst
housing shortage ever foisted on this
nation, and they’re only the beginning.
Unless decisive action is taken quick
ly, watch for a rebirth of the old slum
communities of tents and shacks that
mushroom in deserted lots, along river
banks, on the outskirts of town.
Only to bring the story up to date,
these new housing projects should be
called Snydervilles in tribute to Re
conversion Director John W. Snyder,
whose actions thus far have endeared
him solely to the real estate interests.
The way to solve the housing crisis
is not just to insure greatly expanded
new construction, as Snyder has done,
but to make sure that new homes are
moderately priced and that price ceil
ings are set by legislation on both
new and old homes. It won’t help the
veterans or thousands of other hdme
seekers if there are apartments avail
able—but at prices they can’t afford.
The inflationary effects of Snyder's
initial order dropping all wartime con
trols on construction is already being
felt. A page 1 story in the Wall Street
Journal blithely announces, Rents Are
Going Up: and predicts that an ordin
ary 3-room apartment which used to
rent for $60 a month or less will bring
at least $90 to $1CO a month in the
new apartment houses.
And those rentals are just a fore
taste of what will happen generally
if industry wins in its fight against
OPA price ceilings on existing dwell
ings. Snyder is reported sitting up
nights trying to decide whether to bow
to the landlords’ demands for dump
ing all housing price controls or to
heed the good advice of OPA officials
who are calling for legislation against
real estate inflation. Organized labor
can help him make up his mind by
writing to him and their congressmen
urging them to legislate price controls
on housing.
1
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WISDOM
4+444444,4«44 Mm444444444444
Arbitrary power is most easily
established on the ruins of liberty
abused to licentiousness. George
Washington. i
JSl
THE POTTERS HERALD
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DONALD D.
ir
SHAY
For Solicitor
Rr
1
BERTA.
DAWSON
For Treasurer
HOMER T.
AMOS
For Pres, of Council
$
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JOHN
HILL
a
Foe Councilman at Large.
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JAMES H.
KELLY
1st Ward Councilman
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PAUL V.
BAXTER
—«MV
Presenting the Republican Candidates
-------r.
O. EARL
GREENAWALT
For Mayor
VOTE
FOR YOUR
Republican Nominees
Election Nov. 6, 1945
VgAlg^
^»t.wS!
REPUBLICAN TICKET
For Mayor
O. Earl GREENAWALT
For President of Council
HOMER T. AMOS
For Treasurer
BERT A. DAWSON
For Solicitor
DONALD D. SHAY
For Clerk of Municipal Court
RALPH A. McSHANE
For Councilmen at Large
(Vote for not more than three)
L. T. CAPEHART
Edgar H. HEDDLESTON
JOHN G. HILL
For Member of Council
1st Ward
JAMES H. KELLY
2nd Ward
PAUL V. BAXTER
3rd Ward
JOHN E. SHINGLER
4th Ward
ALBERT L. HALL
For Municipal Judge
Frank E. GROSSHANS
Vote the Straight REPUBLICAN TICKET!
4i
■Ati
$
JOHN E.
SHINGLER
2nd Ward Councilman 3rd Ward Councilman
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PAGE THREE
FRANK E.
GROSSHANS
For Judge Mun. Court
Non Partisan Judicial Ticket
4
4,:
EDGAR H.
HEDDLESTON
or Councilman at Large
MP
CAPEHART
For Councilman at Large
I
ALBERT L.
HALL
4th Ward Councilman
REPUBLICAN COMMITTEE—E. Allan McKeever. Chairman
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RALPH A.
McSHANE
or Clerk of Mun. Court
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