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The potters herald. [volume] (East Liverpool, Ohio) 1899-1982, May 02, 1946, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78000533/1946-05-02/ed-1/seq-6/

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PAGE SIX
W-
"M
b:
be
You Can See the Cream
ALWAYS USE
CREAM TOP
Milk Bottles
THEY ARE SANITARY
Used h'xdiuivelr By
Golden Star Dairy
Phone 3200
WHAT ABOUT THIS
SOCIAL SECURITY?
a-*’'/-’
“I’ve been looking at this post card,
Joe. You and the other fellows on our
Social Security Committee have been
handing them out. Said they were for
finding out about my social security
wage record. Why should I?”
“Well, Pete, that’s up to you. Why
should^ you check up on your bank
balance? You do, don’t you? Well,
your social security wage record is
even more important! Think what it
means to you! Your social security
benefits and those of your family—
under Old-Age and Survivors’ Insur
ance—depend on the record of your
wages. And that record is kept by
the Social Security Board.
“If your wage record does not show
all the wages you have earned—in
employment covered by the law-, the
amount of Old-Age and Survivors’ In
surance benefits which some day may
come to you and your family will be
smaller than it should be. Now do
you se»- why it’s so important to help
keep your record straight?”
“Oh, it’s important all right, Joe.
But can’t the Government keep it
straight? Can’t they add figures?”
“Certainly they can! And it would
surprise you to see how accurate the
social security bookkeeping is. Most
of it’s done with electrical machinery.
I reckon those machines don’t ever
make a mistake. But they can’t cor
rect the mistakes others make!”
“Mistakes others make? What
others?”
“Well, you for example. The wage
record starts with you. And you may
be responsible for an error in it.”
“I don’t get it, Joe. What have I
got to do with it?”
“I’ll show you, Pete. Here’s the
set-up. The Social Security Board
makes up your wage record from the
reports sent in by the persons or
firms you work for.. These reports
are sent in every three months with
the social security taxes.
“The Social Security Board looks
over the report on which your em
ployer has listed the amount of wages
he has paid you for the past 3 months.
This amount is entered on your own
separate social security account—the
account marked with your name and
your social security account number.”
“Do employers sometimes make a
mistake in their reports?”
“Naturally. They’re human, aren’t
IV. How Much Is in Your Social Security Account?
'______________ _____ ___
few and far between. And even then,
the chances are that they are your
own fault.”
“My fault? How can that be?”
“This way: I’ve just explained how
your social security account is kept
separate from all the other 80 million
accounts because it is marked with
your name and your social security
number. Now suppose your employer
should send in a report of wages paid
you and he doesn’t use your right
name? He calls you Jerry, doesn’t
he? Suppose that’s the name he used
on the payroll? Wouldn’t the Social
Security Board have a sweet time
getting your wages entered in YOUR
account? It is up to you to make
sure that your name is entered cor
rectly on the payroll—exactly—and
your social security account number
too—just as you have them on your
social security account card. That is
your responsibility.”
“I see. But look, Joe, I know my
name and number are correct on our
payroll right now. I’ve seen them.”
“O. K. But how about the other peo
ple you worked for during the past 4
years
“That’s so. Let’s see. I worked for
Al Carter over at the saw mill
and Mr.
and
farm
“Hold
Brown was farm work. Farm work
ers are not protected under the Fed
eral Old-Age and Sui^ivors’ Insur
ance—not yet, anyway, though the
Social Security Board thinks they
ought to be and has said so to Con
gress. Neither are people who work
for hospitals, churches and the like—
non-profit organizations they’re called
—nor folks on government jobs and
several other kinds of workers may
be some day they will be covered by
the law—but not yet.
“So, just forget your farm job. You
got no wage credits there.”
“Joe, what was that you said about
the ‘past 4 years’?
wage records dated
1937.”
“Right. They do.
check up on your social security ac
count by writing to the Social Se
curity Board and asking for a state
ment of your wage credits. But any
mistake that might be found can be
corrected only if reported within 4
years.”
“I never knew that. All right, I’ll
mail my check-up card today. Then
what do I do?”
“When the reply comes—the state
ment from the Social Security Board
—you compare it with your own rec
ord. If you find that all the wages
you have earned in covered employ
ment are not recorded, take the mat
ter up at once with the nearest Social
Security Board office, for correction.”
“Joe, I am glad I’ve saved all my
old pay envelopes. They are my own
wage record, aren’t they?”
“Yes, Pete. Every worker should
Haise at the store for a while
that summer on Mrs. Brown’s
on, Pete that job with Mrs.
I thought our
from January 1,
You can always
Vote to Re-Elect
Russ C.
Primaries Tuesday, May 7th
(PoHtical Advertisement)
CARL A. WEINMAN
Steubenville, Ohio
ft
HEDDLESTON
OF EAST LIVERPOOL
Republican
State Committeemaii
I
The only candidate from Colum
biana County for this office.
Endorsed by all Republican
Mayors of Columbiana County,
and the Republican Executive
Committees of Columbiana,Car
roll and Belmont Counties.
31
ft
For Republican State
Committeeman Vote
ft
Russ C. Huddleston
SUMMERTIME—Here’s what we’ll
meet* on the beach in a few weeks.
Well—we hop? so. That tricky get-up
is a combination play or sun suit that
can be converted into swimming garb
by removing the detachable wrap
around skirt. (Federated Pictures).
OPA In Balance
As Senators Get
New Warnings
Washington (FP)—A couple of im
pressive warnings were sounded April
25 as Big Business continued to put
on the heat in the Senate to force out
an inflationary OPA extension bill.
Senators, already becoming alarmed
at the record deluge of mail and
wires from the people back home pro
testing against the House bill knifing
price control and assuring higher
business profits, studied these two
new developments:
1—A group of businessmen organ
ized into the Council of American
Business, publicly revolted against
the National Association of Manufac
turers and the U. S. Chamber of Com
merce by writing Senators to extend
OPA without change.
2—The LT. S. Department of Com
merce released official figures show
ing that American corporations in
1945 managed somehow to pile up
profits of $20,900,000 (billions) before
taxes. After paying their taxes, they
showed profits that were only 7% be
low the 1944 figure, and this with the
heavy cancellation of government war
orders after V-E day.
The new businessmen’s organization
is headed by General Manager George
C. Hatch of the Intermountain Net
work, Ogden, Utah. It issued a public
statement saying that Big Business
opposition to OPA was based upon a
“philosophy of greed." It declared
NAM’s “weasel worded statistics are
a deliberate distortion of the feelings
of
American business toward OPA."
Give Credit
(Continued From Page One)
sisters, and cast your ballot for those
you think most capable of represent
ing No. 124 at the next convention
The time set for the meeting is 7:3(1,
p. m.
We were glad to see Brother James
Slaven has been picked for organiza
tion work. Capable and efficient, we
know ‘Jim* will fill the bill and our
best wishes are extended him in his
new endeavor.
Fully recovered from an illness
which had him confined to his home
for the past several weeks, Brother
Tony Wynn was present at our meet
ing and participated in the various
discussions on trade problems. One of
the ‘old faithfuls’ of Local 124, Tony’s
advice and counsel is always wel
comed.
An appeal from the American Can
cer Society for financial assistance in
carrying on their fight against the
dreaded disease, found the local mak
ing their usual donation.—O. C. 124.
save the wage-and-tax statements his
employer gives him with his pay.
They may be very useful. That’s why
the law demands that the employer
furnish them.
“And Joe, we can help keep our ac
counts straight by checking up on
them every year. Use the card made
for that purpose. You can get one at
any Social Security office, if your So
cial Security Committee doesn’t have
any on hand.’’
Jefferson County JUDGE
CARL A. WEINMAN
for—
COURT OF APPEALS a
1. —He has served as Common Pleas Judge for TEN years.
2. —REPUTABLE IMPARTIAL PROGRESSIVE!
3. —Endorsed by the people he has served and the Jefferson County Bar Association.
4. —It is time we should elect a younger man who will welcome suggestions from the people
to improve the court.
(Political Adv«rtiMnant)i
THE POTTERS ffERAT.D
NEWS AND
VIEWS
By ALEXANDER S. L1PSETT
(An ILNS Feature)
I have no taste for some of Wash
ington’s labor and economic dishes.
I have often said what I believe had
to be said in defense of the vital in
terests of the working people of
America. I reject the claims of stat
ism over the daily lives of our citi
zens from the cradle to the grave,
believe in restriction of bureaucratic
control as a prerequisite of progress.
I hold that the more government med
dles in affairs of
more muddled do
fairs become.
the individual, the
our collective af-
and
In short, I am unregenerate
unanointed with the holy oil of
Deal ism—a man twice damned.
New
con
No, that is not a breastbeating
fessiorfT Nor is it supposed to mean
thumbs down on a limited extension
of OPA controls and other wartime
aegulations whenever such action
serves the public good. These mat
ters are presently subject of congres
sional debate.
But in the excitement of that con
troversy let us not lose sight of the
fact that government agencies are
human institutions. Good or bad, they
are determined to hang on. They are,
as that thunderous voice of union
labor, the United Mine Workers
Journal, remarked of Chester Bowles
and his then OPA, anxious “to keep
their high-salaried jobs of dishing out
baloney—but not the kind you want.”
What does it all lead up to? Messrs.
Snyder, Bowles, et al., are deter
mined to prove that the United
States, under the Truman Adminis
tration, are much better off than was
to be expected. If we are to accept
government figures, the problems of
industrial reconversion and post-war
adjustment have been solved.
Of course, government over-all
estimates are apt to cover a multi
tude of sins. Looking at these statis
tical somersaults, we are reminded
that unemployment, just like death
and taxes, is with us. The millions of
men and women walking the streets
in search of underpaid jobs are not
likely to become over-optimistic. Peo
ple have an uncanny habit of spot
ting liars. It does,not matter who and
how highly placed they are.
.#
The United Mine Workers Journal
stated recently that “just like under
prohibition” the jnen in Washington
are the last onearto know what is
happening in America. And then it
goes on to say:
“Outside of Washington, people
know what’s going on now. At long
last, Old Doc Gallup seems to be
catching on. The Doc’s polling or
ganization has gotten down to some
door-bell ringing and questioning
where accurate results are possible.
The reports obtained, when summed
up, show that, excluding farm fami
lies, the average home was paying
$11.50 per week for food in 1942. It)
is paying $17 per week now. Accord
:ng to the Gallup figures, cost of eat
ing is up by 50 per cent in four years.
We think that the Gallup figures are
low and that 75 per cent increase is
nearer the actual outlay—but Gallup
is on the trail and may get there
eventually. And as to clothing, the
deterioration in quality plus upping
of prices average increases from 50
to 100 per cent.
“If that’s not
what is it
‘ruinous inflation,’
i'opular Brands
$1.35
WEINMAN FOR JUDGE COMMITTEE
Edw. V. Corcoran, Chairman
fat.* ,-h
P«r Carton
Minimum Order—3 Cartons
Add post*** ■hown:
3 Carton* within 1 f»0 mile*..........—..ISc
Each additional oarton......................... lc
Over 150 miles odd 1c on each carton
for each additional 150 ntilea from
Hoboken.
Get together with your co-work
ers and save. Send check or
money order.
I'ept, P. H.
PEERLESS SALES
Box 62G Hoboken, N. J.
I'leaw Pont On Bulletin Board.
Tradesmen Get
Employer-Paid
Welfare Fund
child
OF GREED—A
THE PRICE
stands vigil at the scene of the recent
Virginia mine disaster where 12 min
ers were killed. In 14 years, 1,400,
000 miners have been “mangled,
crushed and shattered,” President
John L. Lewis of United Mine Work
ers (AFL) recently pointed out.
Meanwhile mine owners refuse to set
up a satisfactory health and welfare
fund, and the coal strike continues.
(Federated Pictures).
New York (FP)—Ten thousand
painters in New York City will get
employer-provided sick and
benefits after May 1 under a
way agreement, unprecedented
building trades, signed at a
ceremony in City Hall presided over
by Mayor William O’Dwyer.
death
three
in the
public
The agreement was signed by Sec
retary-Treasurer Louis Weinstock of
District Council 9, Brotherhood of
Painters (A FL), President J. W.
Zucker of the Association of Master
Painters & Decorators and Vice Pres
ident Edmund B. Whittaker of Pru
dential Lift* Insurance Co.
will
and
and
The workers and their families
receive life insurance, sickness
accident benefits, surgical care
hospitalization out of a welfare fund
paid for by the employers, who will
contribute 3 per cent of their weekly
payrolls.
4 A joint union-management state
ment said the pact constitutes “a
milestone in the history of organized
labor in America. For they are the
first agreements .in. the building
trades Industries in* this country
which, by means'of employer contri
butions, provide the workers w'ith in
surance in case of illness or death.
As such, they will add immeasurably
to the security and well-being of the
workers in our industry. It is our
hope that other building trades may
find it possible to extend these bene
fits to their workers.”
Ray War Bonds and fight Inflation.
■M
K
E
Ifs A
Greet System!
By JOHN PAINE, Federated Pres*
Nazi trial defendants are encour
aged by the treatment being given
Franco.
It’s reported that tloering will ask
for an investigation by the United
Nations and demand freedom on the
ground he’s no more of a menace to
the world than the
now that
3:

i
ANY WOMAN! A PKTUM
■f
WARNERS'
Spanish general
army’s gone.
the Nazi
in hell after
12
to
relaxing
Nazi Germany, is said
Hitler,
years in
have asked for a week-end pass to get
back to earth.
He wants to deliver a lecture on his
success in the “get tough with Rus
sia” program. And to sue infringers
on his patent.'
Some people get sick looking down
from the tops of tall buildings.
Others find it simpler to read a
speech by Rankin.
:J .5
Some people are afraid of atomic
bombs.
Others are afraid of the meh in
charge of them.
...
DEFINITIONS
PAY RAISE: Inflationary device
designed to ruin widows and orphans
(financially, of course).
PRICE INCREASE: Statesmanlike
device to get the wheels rolling again,
get hoarded goods oO shelves, encour
age timid capitalists to invest, and in
sure good campaign contributions
next fall.
e
INCREASE IN PRODUCTIVITY:
Only Way a worker can merit a raise.
SPEEDUP: Nobody hen* by that
name, bud, you must have the wrong
number.







s
if
&
3:
BE SAFE! KEEP
John McBane Kerr
IN THE
House, of
Representatives
.. .5** ’'.V
j.,
^^WOUR VOTE
AND INFLUENCE ARE
RESPECTFULLY SOLICITED
Pomary Election, Tuesday,
May 7, 1946.
8 Days Starting Thursday
R'M
.“’a® FIORA ROBSON HAL B. WALLIS
"HARE TONIC" Colored c*r,oon
(Political Advertisement)
SEE IT FROM THE BEGINNING
LIKE 1
KAHN
EDNA FERBER’S
Thursday, May 2, Wtfk
Labor Fighting
1’. (Continued From Page One)
hotel where Representative Dean Gil
lespie was scheduled to address a
luncheon with placards denouncing
the Congressman’s opposition to OPA.
In San Francisco labor- and vet
erans’ organizations planned an aval
anche of letters to Senators, a pa
rade, picket lines in front of depart
ment stores, work stoppages in vari
ous plants and possibly “customer
strikes” to put the heat on Congress.
Open air meetings, shop gate gath
erings, mass distribution of leaflets
and home visits to week-ending Con
gressmen were being held throughout
New York. CIO transport workers
were gathering at shops and barns
right on the line to save OPA. The
garment center’s 85,000 A FL dress
makers warned Senators against pas
sage of the crippling House amend
ments.
Mayor William O’Dwyer of New
York accepted /the chairmanship of
the Citizens’ Committee to Save OPA
after conferring with a delegation of
labor gnd consumer organizations.
Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt is honorary
chairman of the committee, which is
planning a huge rally in Central Park.
JU
We are equipped
render complete Funer
al and Ambiance Ser
vice^ Promptly.
MARTIN
Funeral Home
145 W. Fifth St.
PHONE 355
Ohio Ond IF. Fa.
l.irvew
NIOTONt!
STORY OF STORIES
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JUITONCITO
SAM WOOD-=
PRODUCTION 0IRECTE08T
NEWS OF THE DAY
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