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The potters herald. [volume] (East Liverpool, Ohio) 1899-1982, September 05, 1946, Image 6

Image and text provided by Ohio History Connection, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78000533/1946-09-05/ed-1/seq-6/

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PAGE SIX
a*
"f
■M-
1
ji we celebrated the victory of
armies in the field. But for labor
battle has just started. Unless
f:\ consolidate the gains won by
blood and suffering of our fighting
men, all of their sacrifices will have
been in vain. This means a continuing
•/. war against the forces of reaction,
just as dangerous an- enemy as
Labor Must Continue To
Lead In Help For Victims
Of War, UNRRA Head Says
Washington, D. G. (ILNS).—In a special Labor Day message
to the labor press, Director General F. H. LaGuardia of the United
Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration said that labor
must continue to lead the movement for aiding the victims, of Hit
ler’s rule. At the same time, he warned that it was imperative that
labor keep up its fight against reaction, which he declared as a
dangerous an enemy as the Nazis.
LaGuardia’s statement, which was cabled from overseas, fol
lows:
“Labor Day, 1945, offers a stirring challenge to all true friends
of labor. It is more than a year since*
our
the
we
the
Hill,
the
let
Nazis. We just can’t afford to
down.
“I have just finished a tour of
e nations, which were beaten down
the brutal Hitler gang. The sights 1
saw are almost too terrible to de
'. scribe. Ravaged cities and towns,
wrecked homes and factories, but far
worse than that, wrecked human be
ings. Little children, pitifully under
nourished, grown men and women
whose bodies and souls will always
carry the scars of the torments they
suffered. But there’s plenty of fight
left in them. With their weakened
hands they are setting about to re
store what has been
ing courageously to
structure than before.
“Labor has shown
pathy for these unhappy people. It
has given generously. It has been
solidly behind every bit of legisla
tion needed to help them. It must
continue this interest. It must lead
in this movement.
the
by
I
destroyed, hop
build a better
a warm *syhn
Peace Only Hope
“The only hope we have of a world
at peace, is a world of men and wom
en with enough to eat, with the op
portunity to enjoy a life with some
happiness in it, with a chance to work
without exploitation and receive in
return, enough to ensure security for
themselves and their children.
“There is so much to do in this
world. There is so much to do in our
own country. Labor has come into its
own in the United
better conditions,
nized, have come
bilities. To enjoy
life we must produce and to produce
we must work.” I
States. And witn
its rights recog
greater responsi
a full and richer
Ouy failure to write more personal
letters is due to embarrassment be
cause our life is so dull or so it
-seems at the time.
«M*fWy pcyMMfi Ilk* rent
My «wnt DioT* why I |llt« tfw
*avii*g« end loam Mortgage. In
•wwt rtrtM are moderate, tea
temp Mm r«p«yiMnt demomh l»
Vfhf dea'f VOU wni
lor Ml MormeNcn tooF
FIRST FEDERAL
Savings & Loan Co.
1032 Pennsylvania Ave,
Labor Head Urges
Elimination Of
Private Utilities
Louisville, Ky. (FP)—Declaring
that privately owned utilities have
two main objectives, the “vicious ex
ploitation of the citizenry” and the
destruction of organized labor, Sec
retary E. H. Weyler of the Kentucky
Federation of Labor has sent a letter
to all Kentucky AFL locals urging
them to plan action to end the utili
ties* domination.
Weyler pointed out that “for many
years your state ft*deration has been
witness of the fact that the privately
owned utilities companies in Ken
tucky have been using every means,
fair or foul, to destroy all efforts of
the citizenry to promote public mean.
of obtaining cheaper and better
power.”
fl_ I
^.1.<p></p>Labor
He therefore urged all members of [building political fences, about prac
the AFL to learn of the advantages [tical politics? It looks as though we
of public utilities, to campaign on be- |had come to think of politics as the
half of programs like the TVA and [science of putting something over,
to make every effort to organize |and of politicians as a peculiar breed
utilities workers. |of crooks.
“Our final goal,” Weyler said, But_why should we assume that
“should be municipal ownership of |ajj those who are in elected offices
public utilities and the complete lshould have low motives? Would we
elimination of privately owned
ties.”
“I urge you,” he told union
bers, “to give this program
earnest consideration in order that
mem’ I
as “very pleased.” Both said they
pected the agreement to provide
basis for a harmonious future
lationship.
residential buildings
lumbia University.
Legislature passed and Gov. Dewey
signed a bill extended the provisions
of the State Labor Relations Act to
KENTUCKY AFL
WEEKLY RADIO
Frankfort, Ky.
tucky Federation of Labor is sponsor
ing a regular 15-minute weekly radio
program dedicated to labor’s interests.
BROADCAST
(FP)—The Ken-
Broadcast over Station WFKY at[&
p. m. each Wednesday night, the
9 I
program is prepared by the federa
tion’s education department and con
tains news and information of value
to workers.
FOR A CHANGE, SERVE
BETSY ROSS SLICED VIENNA
Enriched with Vitamin and Iron
AT NEW YORK A FL CONFAB—Senator James M. Mead (D.,
confers with President Anthony A. Capone of the Rochester Central
^21 A a
z.<p></p>Lieutenant-Governor
patriotic as we are—until we find to
y°ur|the contrary? If or when we do, there
I
New York City (ILNS). A 3-day backslidings of other nations, we
strike of jamtore and elevator opera- Lefer to voti afi a great and much.
tors at 15 apartment, houses owned to.be.desired privilege-but, tell me,
C,’U,rb,a Un,verslty ‘‘nded Aug. |haVe you voted at every election?
28 with an agreement by the univer- |jjave you exercised your privilege—
sity to abide by the pro/isions of the Lr were you one of those who were
standard building service wage agree- [too busy to go to the polls or who
[didn’t like any of the candidates who
settlement, which was ar- [were choserj in the primaries—at
ment.
The
ranged through the efforts of the I which you didn’t vote because it
State .............
that the maintenance-of-membership I voter
clause, center of the controversy be-1 What is an election? I like the
tween the university and Local 32-B [dictionary's final definition. “Any
»f the Building Service Employees’[choice between alternatives free
International Union, AFL, be modi- [choice, especially of means to an
fied to provide for arbitration in dis-[end hence, discretion responsibility.”
puted cases. In a prize-winning essay written
4- a. 1
zvn^.-.<p></p>Joseph
committee will decide the i.s. ue. (Federated Pictures).
utih-fjn their place? Can not we believe
I
I|
------------------------------------------------2-----------------------------------------------------
On Politics
At the same time, he said, utilities nn„_
like the Louisville Gas & Electric Co. I| RUTH TAYLOR
have been notorious in their cam-1 Have you noticed how much loosel
paigns to frustrate organization qf [talk there is going on about the po
their employees. 4 [litical reason back of every act, about
that they are at least as honest, as
is the ballot box correct
L'”'always .......................tos
our people might be able to obtain Lh e situation.
the necessities of life, such as water, what is a voter? What is an elec
gas and electricity at the lowest P°s*|tion? We say they are the basis of
sible cost and so they can free them-
[qU].
selves from the exploitation brought |about the great number of voters in
about by the control of these neces- [this country, and of free elections,
sities in the hands of the greedy few.’ |but do we stop to realize the full sig
[nificance of our own words?
form of democracy. We talk
CvFAnlc I According to the dictionary, a voter
UniVVI Miy Wl Ulin |is «one who votes.” But there is a
[great discrepancy between the num
■Hwl i/vlHllflWj Iber of voters and the number of peo
ikT v i «•!.
/tt
o Iple who can vote. When we refer to
Mediation Board, provided [“wasn’t important?” Are you a
In a joint statement, David Sulli- |by Ralph Bushnell Potts, for the
van, president of Local 32-B, and Jo- [American Bar Association Committee
seph Campbell, assistant treasurer of |o« American Citizenship, there was a
the university, expressed themselves [paragraph I wish could be framed in
ex- livery voting booth. “I vote as if my
the [ballot alone decided the contest. 1
re-1 may lose my preference, but I will
|not throw away my sacred vote. For
un- [w^bin the booth 1 hold in my humble
^hand the living proxy of all my coun-
The union has been making an
several years to
successful effort for
obtain contracts in commercial and tr^a b?n?_rel *_
-a*
operated by Co- LniThere *8 n,oral to t.hia arlicU‘
Last April the The^ 18 Just, an earnest P1®8. that as
Ra citizen and a voter you will think
it out for yourself, ignoring party
llabels and catch phrases. Consider
cover^Zn-id'liuiidinis" owned' by|lh?J,sue y““r"wn responsibility
educational organizations. The W|||m the comm* elecbonn and u»e ur
was especially directed at the Colum-|'«w" “I?. wlth csr"ful' *i,s'
Ida situation. Ipassronate thought.
SPONSORS I ^m8nr* Union Lnbel
ROME LOANS
l?c
I

FOR VETERANS
... under the terms of
the G.I. Bill of Rights are
available here. Stop in
for consultation
without obligation.
BE SURE TO BRING YOUR HONORABLE DISCHARGE.
The Potters Saving & Loan Co.
WASHINGTON & BROADWAY EAST LIVERPOOL. OHIO
OFFICERS
JOHN J. PURINTON. President
CHAS. W. HENDERSHOT,
Vice President
THE POTTERS HERALD*
....
I Hatters Sponsor s
Five-Year Union
Label Campaign
New York (FP—Embarking on al’
Typo "Union
CREAM TOP
Milk Bottles
Draft Deferments
May Be Granted
I Building Workers
Zaritsky said many people have de
plored labor’s failure to patronize Frequently it’s advisable not even
union goods and services but pointed [to attempt an explanation,
out that “a business that fails to ad
vertise shouldn’t be astonished if no
customers come to the store.”
“We want to bring this to the at
tention of hundreds of thousands of
trade unionists, not only to promote
patronage of our union label, but to
bring greater appreciation of the sac- II
rifice and achievement of the Ameri
can labor movement which was the
foundation of our modern streamlined
organizations.”
■pt s at-
(Continued From Page One)
60, women 55 authorizing a new
age
history of the ITU published that no
contract be approved which provides
for a workweek rf more than 37*/j
hours indorsing the Wagner- Murray
Dingell bill. 4’
The next convention of the ITU
will be held in Cleveland, Ohio.
Strteamland Park
(Continued From Page One)
of the following committee: O. L. I
Sullivan, chairman Margaret Dowd,
Gladys Van Ness, Beatrice McGowan,
Leia O’Shay, Gilbert O’Shay, Benny
Cohn, Felix Zuvanich, Helen Baker,
Pete Easley, Roy Beatty. ________ I
You Can See the Cream I """SJ"1*
ALWAYS USE
THEY ARE SANITARY
Vord Exdtuioely By n
Golden Star Dairy
Phono 3200
ALWYN C. PURINTON. Secretary
IOS. M. BLAZER, Treasurer
W. E. DUNLAP, RL, Attorney
*1 Washington, D. f*. (ILNS). The
machinery by which skilled workmen
engaged in home building may be
i’ecommended for draft deferments In
rder that they can continue to work
in the veterans’ emergency housing
irogram has been set up by the Na
|tional Housing Agency and .the
lective Service System.» .■*
NHA will assist the director of
i ective Service in recommending
$ killed
i should be deferred from military
ervice.
vorkers have been determined by the
'irector of Selective Service as eli
ible for certification by NHA:
•. 1. Skilled workmen engaged in
home building where shortages of
nich men have been established. Such
|’persons must have had at least 3
years of training and experience in
key building crafts, such as bricklay
ing, plastering, plumbing and car
centering. It must be established that
*£^|the loss of such persons is delaying
or immediately threatens to delay
the veterans’ housing program.
Y.) 2. Managerial or supervisory per-
N, ____ o____
... -_.r TradesIsonnel possessing a minimum of 3
L» 1.1 1 AN«• L»/xl* £0 /Ml (^a
& Council as Hanley looks on. Capone is|years» experience in home construc
spearheading a drive to ha.e the State AFL indorse Mead for Governor as |tjon
opposed to Governor Thomas E. Dewey (R., bi. Y.). A 25-man non-partisan I
KTua
I.
I
five -year nation -wide advertising
campaign, the United Hatters Cap & (Continued From Page One)
Millinery Workers’ Union (AFL) an- |Los Angeles council obtained from
nounced its determination to make [Ramsey S. Black, former third as
America’s workers more union label [sistant postmaster general, permis
conscious. Ision to put the union label on the face
Announcing the opening of the lof business reply envelopes “for the
campaign, President Max Zaritsky [time being.”
said union members will contribute While the post office’s regulation
$3 a year to finance an educational |was in effect union labels which did
broadside that will include radio, mo- [appear on the face of some business
vies, slide films, direct mail, and [reply envelopes were inserted after
newspaper advertising, mostly in [approval of the proof, without the
labor publications. °ff*ce’3 knowledge.
■'■■"ItUI
SWA
Se-
Se
the
construction workers who
The following types of
z
.^HA. recommends deferment
for a given individual, the Selective
JService
..I
Director will transmit the
recommendation to the appropriate
iSelective Service local board, which
jlwill give serious consideration to the
■recommendation..
O^t Off ICG BOCltS
WHAT NEXTf
A new method of housing con
struction which promises to bring
down manufacturing costs 15 per
cent is now being tested at a pre
fabricated house plant in Sweden.
It consists of substituting the ex
pensive wood wherever possible
with excelsior, which has been
especially impregnated with certain
chemicals and later mixed with ce
ment. This is then pressed into
molds of wood which serve as up
rights and supports, while the
plastic mass forms *the walls and
at the same time insulates the
houses against cold or heat, having
an insulating capacity which ex
ceeds that of wood 300 per cent.
Wheatley Attends
(Continued From Page One)
went a major operation at the Md
Kinley Hospital was present at- ou¥
last meeting and reports he is feeling
fine. Alex made a rapid recovery and
his many friends are glad to see him
back in the fold.
Bro. Albert Mitchell is now in our
midst, having come to us via Canons
burg, Pa. We welcome the new
brother and hope he will make Tren
ton his permanent home.
attended
a report
with the
Vice President Wheatley
the last meeting and made
on matters he had taken up
firm. We are looking forward to our
meeting on September 9 when we
hope to again have him with us to
discuss trade problems.—O. C. 184.
The Union Label is the emblem of
industrial democracy.
TERGIF' KIND SAYS
Now Is the Time
to Buy Coal
PHONES:
Office 934 Home 693
KIND COAL CO
Railroad & Bollock Streets
STARTS SATURDAY
JANE RUSSELLH
NEWS OF THE DAY—SELECTED
I..............|in. 1.1111111111
.hiJi......................................
Thursday, September 5, 1946
OPA Not Immune
From Buyer Strike
Washington (FP)—Things are get
ting so tough on the price front that
even OPA employees have to go on a
buyer strike.
That was the picture here as the
OPA branch of Local 3, United Public
Workers voted unanimously at a
membership meeting, to *stage a
buyer strike against the high prices
in the OPA building cafeteria. The
strike will be a one-day stand, on
Sept. 6. Continuation is promised if
the demonstration of non-buying is
not effective. 7“ ,,,
A report to the uh iob rneeting
showed that Government Services,
Inc., which holds the cafeteria con
cession, has a surplus of $1,800,060
and cleared $350,000 in 1945. Union
spokesmen claim that cafeteria prices
have risen. 30,-40 per cjpnt since June
30th.-A
1
9
tTHCAGO BAKERS WIN RAISE
Chicago (FP) Striking bakers
have won demands for $55 pay for a
42-hour week from more than 200
neighborhood bakeries here since they
walked out August 10.
Well Pun With Yo®
We feel that in each banking
transaction whether it be ac
I cepting the deposit of a customer
or extending a personal Ioan
we are not rperely serving one in
‘l dividual, but helping to set in mo
tion a chain of events which will
add to the productivity, and wealth
of our entire community.
The First National
I East Liverpool’s Oldest Bank
Member F. D.
Phone 914
ST
Bating
Brunette
A^’***1
ggsa***^
Added Attractions
JIB 'I Illi I
Continuous Shows Saturday and Sunday
.'1
s
i
KelMMd thru UNITED ARTISTS
SHORT FEATURES

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