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The potters herald. [volume] (East Liverpool, Ohio) 1899-1982, April 24, 1947, Image 6

Image and text provided by Ohio History Connection, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78000533/1947-04-24/ed-1/seq-6/

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PAGE SIX
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i SEARCH FOR DEAD—Rescue workers search through mangled
Wffeckage of the Texas City Monsanto Chemical Co. factory seeking
bodies of victims caught in tbe ruins. Among the dead in the plant
are a number of members of the Inti. Bro. of Boilermakers (AFL).
Also killed were seamen of the Natl. Maritime Union.
triRougri
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1
Wattention
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wt s.
JOHN
tZl.
E ARE continuing to direct the
of industrialists to the
advantages of locating here in Ohio,
in a series of national advertisements,
jof which this is one.
We believe that no other location
I
McDonald, Jr!
National AdvirtjsiN6
E
a dance of natbral resources and we
J** OHIO POWER ca
nik, JT'B
Wages Cause Of
Strikes In 1946,
US Figures Show
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Republican Candidate)
For
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
VETERAN OF
WORLD WAR II
i
Your Vote and Influence
Appreciated
(Political Adv.)
Industries
A Aii analysis of the causes
of strikes during 1946 was pub
lished this week by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics in the Depart
ment of Labor. In it were signifi
cant facts that Congress would do
well to ponder.
For example, the report showed
clearly that the walkouts were not
due to “abuses” or “excesses” on
the part of labor, but arose out of
fundamental economic causes.
“Wages were the outstanding
issue in work stoppages of 1946,”
the Bureau stressed. “Problems of
maintaining or increasing ‘take
home’ pay in the face of rising
prices were of primary concern.”
Wages Chief Cause
Nearly half the stoppages were
due solely to that issue, but since
they involved some of the largest
plants, headed by the toughest em
ployers, they caused 81.9 per cent
of all man-days lost by strikes last
year. Another 13.4 per cent of the
losses came from strikes in which
wages and several other issues
were combined.
Thus, 95.3 of the toll takeri by
strikes was due in whole or part
to the effort of workers to keep
up “take-home” pay which cata
pulted after the war.
“Union Shop” Minor Issue
Disputes solely over the “closed”
or “union” shop, which powerful
forces seek to outlaw, led to only
2.G per cent of the strikes, but the/
“were for the most part small” and
produced only ’/_ of 1 per cent of
the aggregate 1946 strike losses.
This figure would be slightly high
er if it included those controversies
where the “union shop” was one
among other issues.
As for jurisdictional and other
inter-union clashes, about which
so much propaganda has been
spread, they took an even smaller
toll. Those controversies involved
only about 1 per cent of the work
ers who struck in 1946 and “only
about 1/200 of the total idleness,”
the Bureau declared.
The best persuasion for Union
wages is the constant demand for
Union products!
to thisArea
TO MAKE MORE JOBS FOR
MORE ANDJIORE OHIOANS
’’io*
VW
S
Advertisements In
this series have
betn run in Busi
ness Week, For
tune, and in other
National Maga
zines and News
papers.
publicize both the natural and devel
oped assets of the 555
we serve.
friendly towns
A
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The resolution passed at the
meeting of the Maritime Trades
Department follows:
Whereas, The American Mer
chant Marine, during World War
II, was built up to approximately
50 million tons by American tax
payers, at a cost to them of ap
proximately 20 billion dollors and
Whereas, The American Mer
chant Marine today is rapidly de
creasing and if nothing is done by
the Maritime Commission and Con
gress to stop this decrease of
American ships we will find our
selves with an American Merchant
Marine of less tonnage than we
had prior to the war and
Whereas, In 1936 the Merchant
Marine Act was passed by Con
gress, which had for its purpose
the building and maintaining of a
large and substantial American
Merchant Marine to take care of
the commerce of this country and
to establish national defense and
Whereas, In the last few months
millions of tonnage of American
built ships, built by the American
taxpayers’ money, has been bought
by foreign operators and trans
ferred to foreign
the Panamanian
American capital
a number of U.
bought ships to Panamanian regis
try and
THE POTTERS HERALD, EAST LIVERPOOL, OHIO
STOCKHOLDERS ON PICKETLINE—Disregarding the driving ra
in, telephone workers picket the annual stockholders meeting at the
American Telephone & Telegraph building in New York. Inside the
meeting the union’s counsel Henry Mayer charged the director with
“hatching a conspiracy” that forced the strike as a wedge for nation
wide union-smashing._____________________________
Supports Seafarers' Protest
Against Sale of U. S. Ships
Washington, D. C. The Mari
time Trades Department of the
A FL has been given assurance by
President William Green that the
AFL will solidly support its pro
test against sale of more Ameri
can commercial vessels to countries
which hitherto have shown no
record of export or import.
In a message to John R. Owens,
executive secretary of the AFL
Maritime Trades Department, Mr.
Green said:
“I deeply appreciate the import
ance of the question raised in your
message regarding the transfer of
many American-built ships to
foreign flags. Because of the sacri
fice of interests in the transfer of
American ships to Panama and
other countries it becomes our duty
to do everything we can to pre
vent the shift of these vessels. We
will join with representatives of
the Seafarers’ and Longshoremens’
organizations in appealing to Con
gress to deal with this complaint
in a practical, constructive and
satisfactory way.”
flags, including
flag, and also
has transferred
S. Government-
Whereas, Today the Republic of
Panama has a merchant marine
tonnage twice as large as it had
prior to the war and
Whereas, The Republic of Pana
ma is not a seafaring nation and
does not, by any stretch of the
imagination, need this type of ton
nage in connection with the export
and import trade of their country
and
Whereas, American capital and
foreign countries who transferred
their ships under the Panamanian
flag obviously did this for several
reasons: namely, to save taxes, to
operate ships with cheaper crews,
and to avoid regular steamboat in
spection service and
Whereas, This condition not only
weakens the American Merchant
Marine and puts thousands of sea
men and American shipyard work
ers and longshoremen out of work,
but also weakens the national de
fense of the United States of.
America now, therefore, be it
Resolved, That the Maritime
Trades Department, composed of
250,000 American maritime trans
portation workers affiliated with
the American Federation of Labor,
hereby go on record demanding
that the Maritime Commission,
which is charged by Congress un
der the Marchant Marine Act of
1936 with promoting and safe
guarding and building a first-class
American Merchant Marine for
fsjj’ s?
economic and national defense
reasons, immediately take steps
to stop the sale of ships to non
maritime nations. And/or to buy
ers, either American or foreign,
who transfer American-built or
purchased tonnage, to the Republic
of Panama or other non-maritime
nations
And be it further resolved,
That we immediately put this
problem before Congress through
the Committee on Merchant Marine
and Fisheries and the Senate
Committee on Interstate and
Foreign Commerce and request
that they immediately take legis
lative steps to plug any loopholes
in. the Ship Sales Act which creates
a condition of disposing of Ameri
can tonnage belonging to the
American taxpayers in such man
njr that it' depletes the American
Merchant Marine and allows
foreign or American speculators to
gtpw fat at the American taxpay
er^ expense.”
Greetr Pays High
Tribute To Public
Health Nurses
—i
Washington, D. C. President
William Green extended the warm
felicitations of the American
Federation of Labor to the public
health nurses of America in the
observance of Public Health Nurs
ing Week, set for the week be
ginning April 20.
In a formal statement, Mr.
Green said:
“The week of April 20-26, 1947,
will be observed throughout the
Nation as Public Health Nursing
Week. At this time, tribute will
be paid to the public health nurses
of America—women who are con
scientiously performing a vital
role in curing the sick as well
as preventing disease. The observ
ance of the week is being spon
sored by the National Organiza
tion for Public Health Nursing
with the cooperation of other
groups including the United
States Public Health Service.
“More than 20,000 public health
nurses are employed in the United
States and territories by local,
State and national agencies. They
wdrk -for health departments,
bojards of education, and other of
ficial agencies, and for nonofficial
organizations such as visiting
nurse associations, tuberculosis as
sociations, insurance companies
arid industries.
j'But 20,000 nurses are not
nearly sufficient to take care of
the needs of all the people. That
is Why the aims of the observance
inelude encouraging more nurses
to enter the field of public health
nursing, interesting more high
school and college girls in choosing
public health nursing as a career,
and stimulating the development
of organized health services in all
areas of the United States.
’‘Public health services of this
kind are of utmost value to the
American worker. The excellent
care given the sick is no less im
portant than the hygiene and
health habits taught by the
nurses at home, in the school and
in the factory, for the long-range
goal of the public health nurses is
a healthy America.
“As President of the American
Federation of Labor, I wish suc
cess to the National Organization
for Public Health Nursing in their
worthy efforts to broaden and im
prove the services of the Public
Health Nurses to the people of
our Nation.”
Purchase Union-made-in-Ameri
ca products io maintain the
American
standard of living!
'A*
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-‘X 7
1*11
1
A
Recession Feared
By Snyder Unless
Prices Are Cut
&•.
Washington, D. C. Response
to President Truman’s appeal to
business to slash prices has been
“here and there,” w’ith no indica
tion of a general recognition of his
request. So far it seems to have
evoked individual scattered reac
tion, but I. tile concerted coopera
tion.
This was the over-all observa
tion of economic experts who care
fullyfully awaited the reaction of
business leaders to the President’s
warning that prices must come
down or wages must rise.
Mr." Truman’s Council of Eco
nomic Advisors, at a recent confer
ence with the President and his
Cabinet, warned that the threat of
a recession has grown since the
first of the year and that immedi
ate adjustment of key prices is im
perative to avert a serious eco
nomic slump, it was learned.
It was the Council’s report, Con
tained in a confidential memoran
dum to the President and discuss
ed in 1 special Cabinet meeting,
that led Mr. Truman, according to
inforced sources, is issue his urgent
call for voluntary price cuts by
business at his press conference
the following day.
The Cabinet agreed in principle
with the analysis presented by the
Council and showed differences
only on points of emphasis, it was
reported.
An even gloomier outlook than
that of the- Council was presented
by Marriner S. Eccles, chairman of
the Federal Reserve Board, who
attended the meeting.
The price structure was ailing
and misshapen, the meeting was
told, and there was no remedy ex
cept voluntary action in such key
industries as steel, automobiles
and building materials, in which
prices respond more readily to
formal decisions than to supply
and demand.
The President was advised also
that voluntary price cuts to date
had been far from adequate. The
leaders in these cuts were, never
theless, praised for their pioneer
ing.
The President was also informed
of the sharply rising rate of pro
fits. which was described in this
fashion:
Profits in 1946 were 30 percent
greater than in 1945. In the last
"FERGIE" KIND SAYS
Now Is tho Time
to Buy Coal
PHONES:
Office 934 Home 693
KIND COAL CO.
Railroad & Bollock Stroots
son
WHEN
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Using a
BREATHTAKING
veil as a prop, and
breezes of the Gulf of Mexico as
a background, this gorgeotis gal
wears the latest in swimsuits—in
case you’re interested in what she
has on. 1
the tropical
quarter of 1946 they were 30 per
cent higher than in the year as a
whole. In the first quarter of this
year, ending March 31, profits
were 30 percent above the rate for
the last quarter of 1946.
Profits aiter taxes in January,
February and March of this year
were at an annual rate of $15,000,
OCO.COO, compared with a 1946 level
of $12,000,000,000 and, on a com
parable basis $7,000,000,000
1929.
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Thursday, April 24
Labor School Course
Awards 17 Diplomas
in
the
the
The danger, according to
Council’s statement, lay not in
rising rate of profits over the
years, since national income had
also risen, but in the tendency of
profits to outstrip buying power
on the incline. As a result of ris
ing prices, purchasing power was
dropping but profits mounting, it
was said.
Money
The Potters Savings & Loan Co.
WASHINGTON S BROADWAY EAST LIVERPOOL OHIO
estemmaeanttaeaeeseesiiiMiMiii sse a as
CERAMIC Theater
ONE WEEK COM. THURSDAY
I If YOU WERE NORA PRENTISS WOUID YOU KEEP YOW MOUTH SHUT?
'Nora Prentiss
..
MIMH
CO'STARRING
THE NEW
WARNER
OFFICERS:^ 1
IOHN J. PURINTON, President ALWYN C. PUBINTON, Secretary
CHAS. W. HENDERSHOT. JOS. M. BLAZER. Troaeurer i
Vice President W. E. DUNLAP, JR« Attorney
mm mm we
SENSATION
ROBERT AIDA ROSEMARY DECAMP
o^ecno. VINCENT SHERMAN
wtth
Continuous Shows Saturday and Sunday
•fi*/
^KMEN MAY BY N. MCHMIO NMH EMM A ETOAY «Y
VAUL WEBSTER A JACK SOBEU MUSIC BY FRANJ WAXMAN
X.I.,
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New York City (ILNS).—4
at ion exercises were held
at the Xavier Institute of
trial Relations, an adult
for leaders in labor unions a
business executives responsi
industrial relations.
r,'K
Diplomas were awarded
men and women who completed the
2-year course, and certificates
were given to 52 who completed the
first year of the course. The
diplomas were presented by the
Rev. John W. Tynan, rector of
the College of St. Francis Xavier.
17
Father Carey announced that
417 persons were registered in the
institute’s labor school, school
for leaders and grievance clinic.
Resolutions were adopted opposing
the Condon-Wadlin bill to out
law strikes by public employes and
urging the retention of rent, ceil
ings and rent control.
Practice what you preach! De
mand Union goods and serviced if
you desire Union wages!
Thrift
--“It’s so easy to be thrifty
by saving a few cents each
i week until December ’47!
Then watch the silver
stacked up into dollars
when you receive your
Christmas Club checKl
STILL TIME TO JOIN
First National
East Liverpool’s Oldest Bank
Member F. D. I. C.
Phone 914
_... Y
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FOR PURCHASE AND IMPROVEMENT
OF HOMES
5% Monthly Reduction '9®“^
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fc. *. z? 'A
"t#
7-
HARD
WHEN
SHE
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