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The potters herald. [volume] (East Liverpool, Ohio) 1899-1982, October 30, 1947, Image 6

Image and text provided by Ohio History Connection, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78000533/1947-10-30/ed-1/seq-6/

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PAGE SIX
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Atlanta (LPA)— A devastating
attack on profiteering in the tex
tile industry as a cause of high
clothing prices and substandard
wage scales was presented to a
Congressional subcommittee on
prices here last week by Kenneth
Douty, Georgia director of the
Textile Workers Union.
Carefully documenting price, pro
fit and wage figures, Douty charg
ed “There are many factors con
tributing to high prices in cloth
ing, but a basic one is that the
textile industry has preferred to
take tremendous profits at the ex
pense of the consuming public and
the workers in the industry who
continue to receive substandard
wages.”
Recalling that the industry was a
leader in the fight to kill OPA,
Douty said, "The reason is obvious:
profits fob this year an estimated
at $764,000,000, an increase of 34%
over 1946 and of over 300% over
1945 after taxes. When we com
pare estimated profits for 1947
with the so-called normal period of
1936-1939, you get into unbeliev
able but true figures.. Profits for
1947 after taxes will be greater
ftZJr
'^ft
HUGE TEXTILE PROFITS
HIGH PRICES, DEPRESS
WAGES, OFFICIAL SAYS
than that base period used for
both OPA and the Treasury Dep’t
—by 2358%.”
Wages have increased but they
are still far below needs, Douty
continued, nor can they explain the
price increases. “Wages have gone
up 147% from 1939 to 1947. Prof
its have gone up over 2000% for
the same period.” The pay neces
sary “to maintain the normal liv
ing standard for a wage earner” in
Atlanta in 1947 amounts to $3589,
said the official. “For textile work
ers translated into annual earnings
amount to $2037.”
Prices have risen “but only the
profit picture explains their pres
ent level,” Douty maintained. “If
you make allowances for the per
centage increases of both labor and
materials, you can find no justifi
cation for the present price level.
According to the Census of Manu
facturers for 1939, wages account
ed for 27% of production costs,
raw materials 48%, miscellaneous
21% and profits 4%. Today it is
estimated that profits are running
at 16%. Reduce that profit percen
tage and you reduce prices.”
Turning to possible solutions of
ACTUAL charges for 500 consecu
tive funerals conducted by the
DAWSON
follows I
Were
Were
Were
Were
SO MUCH
215 West Fifth Street
I
Km rmt ar Ifco—OiroctM on
er or dUskaa, kills venaia la a faw
the magic aid to health
and household convenience
INFRA-RED
Under $150
Under $300
Under $500
Funeral Home
for so little1
lamps widely used In Industry are
now available at your electrical dealer or drug
store. They may bo used for dozens of household
purposes, whergver heat or quick drying Is desir
able. An infra-red lamp will relieve sore and
strained muscles, defiea your dog, defrost your
refrigerator, dry fingernail polish, or hair or paint
er glue—to name a few uses.
This lamp has a built-in reflector and will screw
Into any light bulb socket. It is low in cost anti
easy to use. While the bulb doesn't produce much
light (not a sun lamp—it won't give you a tan).
It throws off plenty of "radiant heat"—hoot that
penetrates right through a solidly frozen pipe or
into the metal of a motor
muscles of an aching back.
Staff CaW Mtn ta vary «aW
w*afh*r by diractiM rays ail pee.
ft
ftft,1
ft.,
ft
Funeral Home are as
the problem, Douty said, “Some of
£'1
Over $500
Phone Main 10
Ptln-Tha pMiatratin* hool
•Okirfra-TMl I* oftoe prcacrihoal
ta Yoliava or mvKU-
lor pole.
Infra-Red Lamps
or down into tho
Dafraata tal.lfaralara—HalW
daaa la the fraaabif wait tha
ham will epaadUy a»aH tha
Oaklt Drylaf at Milady's Hair
—In |w*t a law minufaa tha
(lean panatrattaf ray* will
dry her hair.
with greeM ere cleared Quick*
ly by thm ^eetfr^tieg rays.
Say
It
With
Flowers
INFRA-RED LAMPS FOR
HOUSEHOLD USE MAY
BE PURCHASED FOR
AS LITTLE AS $1.25
I OHIO POWER a
TffT
Truman Receives UII/-AFL Settles
Civil Rights Plan 5 Strikes After
Washington (LPA) President
/Dip report Is understood to cover
the whole field of racial and rehg- AFL CI0 ff.cials djd „ot
ous dowrnnmation, as well as civ,I affiliates could
rights in general. „3e NLRB faci|ities, the UIU
Among the members of the Com- Lounted five waikouts won, four
mission are James Carey, CIO sec-1
retary-treasurer, and Boris Shish- 1
kin, AFL economist. |n ... ...
Attention was focused on the P^hajn s edict was settled al Au
problem of race discrimination in Ind?. when employes of the
the U. S. when the Nat’l Associa- .Ind,anaP°h« Chalrt.Co’’
tion for the Advancement of Color- a.fter vo^n« for UJUt^
ed People presented to the United J24 20 ?n an election conducted
Nations last week a lengthly listing Dmsion of Labor,
of “the treatment which the United Previously when the union was un
States has visited upon us for three ab,e t0 obtain an NLRB election,
centuries.” The NAACP petition lje employerrefused to recognize
asserts that “If the UN today face the union through an impartial
contradictions and frustrations in |™«nt membership^ards
their great effort to build the in- I In the first NLRB election in
ter-nation, no small cause of this is eastern Pennsylvania since pen
that democracy on earth is too of- ’,am was reversed, a UIU local
ten falsifying its own foundation l'von bX two to one and negotiations
principles, and for that reason can- p°r a contract began immediately
not honestly build or cooperate in |wJth Hanover Craftsmen, Inc., of
a just world state.” I Hanover, Pa.
’,3 rf- •‘■i
1'.
A-
ft .4**
4
Denham Reversal
Truman’s Commission on Civil I
Rights is exnected this week to I philadelPhia LPA Reversal
Kignts is expected tnis weeK to i of NLRB General Counsei Robert
make public the first complete I Denham on the question of filing
itemization of the missing links in I anti-Communist affidavits resulted
the protections afforded to Ameri-1 in the quick settlement of several
can citizens under the Constitution, grikes by the Upholsterers’ Int’l
1^- ....
thb things we need to do seem ob- I! ^aa»*»i* maaw
vious. We need an evcess profits II
tax. Instead of cutting needed gov-1
ern men tai services, we should raise l|
taxes on those who can afford to
OBITUARIES
I
pay, to maintain them. We should
I
I
Flowers
WHEN
WORDS
FAIL
Services were held by Rev. D.
Park Chapman, pastor of the First
Church of Christ. Burial was in
Columbiana County Memorial Park.
SI MONTE E. HAGAN
I
a
Sebring, Ohio—Monte E. Hagan,
|72, a resident of Sebring for the
S Ipast 45 years, died Oct. 26 in the
lAlliance
eight weeks’ illness of compli-
I
I S
a
eft.,
John, Greta, Betty, Jack S|with Local Union No. 59, Nation
al lai Brotherhood of Operative Pot-
I
I
City Hospital, following
cations.
$ I A kiln
Igan was
pincer by trade, Mr. Ha
last employed at the Li-
glmoges China Co., and affiliated
United Presbyterian Church at
I
Parker’s Landing and the Salem
I
I
Dry Ri*V«mslf P»ll*k In |i*r
time by placing hand* in
♦ha ray* nf tha lamp.
§j'
THE POTTERS HERALD, EAST LIVERPOOL, OHIO
I
i OBITUARIES
rfits
sd gov-
l!ll
MRS. MARY ANN DORNAN s
cut taxes in the lower income brae- I Mrs. Mary Ann Dornan, 64, died
kets only. We need to reinstitute I Oct. 25 in her home, 258 Ridgeway
price ceilings on necessities. We |Ave., following a several weeks’ ill
need rent controls continued. We I ness.
need measures that will insure in- I Mrs. Dornan resided in East Liv
creased purchasing power: Con- lerpool for the past 60 years, com
gress should pass the 65c mini- ling here from Bradford, Pa., when
mum bill, but make it 75c instead la child. She was employed as a
of the lower figure.”
finisher at Plant 6 of the Homer
1 Laughlin China Co., and affiliated
Iwith Local Union 53, National Bro
Itherhood of Operative Potters. She
was a member of the Fitst Church
of Christ
Mrs. Dornan leaves a daughter,
Mrs. Estus Canavan of East Liver
pool, and three sisters, Mrs. C. H.
Excell and Mrs. John Call, both of
Hammondsville, and Mrs. Harry
Nostrand of New York.
of
Aerie of the Fraternal Order
I
Eagles.
I
his wife, Mrs. Anne Hagan.
I
Services were held from the Par
Iker’s Landing United Presbyter
lian Church. Burial was made in
I
Perryville, Pa.
I
OKEY G. FOUNDS
I
Okey G. Founds, 61, a kilndraw
ler employed at the Hall China Co.,
Idied Oct. 28 in his home, 1059 Am
lbro.se Ave., following a week’s ill-
I
ness.
Mr. Founds was born in Meigs
I
county. He made his home in East
I
Liverpool for the past 44 years. He
I
was a member of Local Union No.
117, National Brotherhood of Oper
ative Potters.
I
Mr. Founds leaves his widow,
I
Mrs. Florence Payton Founds a
Ison, Howard M. Founds, and a
(daughter, Doris I. Founds, all at
I
home a brother, Earl Founds of
I
East Liverpool, and four sisters,
I
Mrs. Emma Wolfe, Miss Ola Founds
land Mrs. Erma Mays of East Liv
lerpool, and Mrs. Mary Colwell of
I
Wellsville.
I
Services were held by W. H.
I
Moon of the International Bible
I
Students Association. Burial was
in Spring Grove Cemetery.
Jnsuud Swings
(rfeenn! wifi
FIRST FEDERAL
SAVINGS And
Loan Association
1032 Pennsylvania Ave.
Main 204
Washington, D. C. (ILNS).
Present economic trends apparent
ly fabor capital, while inflationary
price rises are forcing workers to
exhaust their savings accounts and
go into debt, Albert N. Dennis
said in his Labor News Review pro
gram on WTOP, of the Columbia
Broadcasting System.
Presenting a review of economic
conditions, a regular feature of the
weekly program, Dennis said that
“inflationary prices, quite unreas
onable in many instances, according
to responsible economists, continue
to plague the people of the United
States.”
Corporate Profits Up
The current trend of the econo
my, he continued, “seems to favor
capital, largely along the line of
the old slokan: 'Them what has,
gits!’ According to the U. S. De
partment of Commerce, corpora
tion returns now publicly available
indicate that the level of corporate
profits in the first 6 months of
this year. was higher than last
year, jumping from $7 billion dol
lars infthe fourth quarter of last
year to 29* billions in the first
quarter and back to 27'Xj billions
in the second quarter this year.
Those figures are ‘before taxes.’
“Net profits jumped from 16
billion dollars in the fourth quar
ter of last year to 17% billions, in
the first quarter, then down to
16% billions in the second qqa^ter,
of this year. Publicly reported cash
dividend payments for last month,
September, gained over 20 per cent
in comparison with the same'month
of last year, totaling for the one
month, $559,300,000.
“Meanwhile, reports indicate
that, due to high prices and less
income from over-time pay, thous
ands of wage earners have depleted
their savings accounts and many
have gone into debt. While basic
wage rates have advanced an aver
age of 15 per cent during the past
year and a half, prices of com
modities which wage earners must
buy have kept considerably ahead
of advancing wages.
"The latest report of the Bu
reau of Labor Statistics, for the
week ending October 11, shows
another average increase of
6/10ths of one per cent in the
prices of commodities in primary
markets, for the one week. Farm
prices went up 14 per cent and
food prices advanced an even 1.0
per, cent for the week. The Bu
reau’s Index is now 25.4 per cent
higher than for the comparable
period of last year.
Huge National Income ar’
"The Department of Commerce
indicates that total national in
come for the current year may
reach the staggering figure of
$220,000,000,000. The previous high
was, last year, when the total
reached $165,000,000,000. Inflation
ary prices, of course, account for a
goodly portion of the increases.”
In ending this economic review,
Dennis noted that “despite all talk
of possible tapering off, industrial
is
His only immediate Aurvivor
,'i
'i- 4
'if
i.K
(PAID
4 ..
John B. McDonald, Jr.
REPUBLICAN CANDIDATE
FOR
CITY SOLICITOR
Bom in East Liverpool, Ohio, March 31
1914, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. B. McDonald.
Member of St Stephen’s Episcopal Church.
Educated in the East Liverpool Public
Schools, Lafayette College and Western
Reserve University Law School. Commenc
ed practice of Law at East Liverpool in
July, 1941. Enlisted in the U. S. Navy, 1943,
serving three years aboard the Destroyer,
USS Ebert, in both the European and
Asiatic-Pacific Campaigns. Honorably dis
charged from the Navy in 1946 apd return
ed to the active practice of law. Nominated
Republican Candidate for City Solicitor,
May 6th, 1947.
Your Vote and Influence Respectfully
Solicited.
General Election—November 4th
Workers Deplete Savings AccounfslSolidarity Aids
As Soaring Prices Plague NationjShipyard Strike
leWy Of
nOTIOIl
ft
*'A«&-'
S I
Total Industrial
a aa.
Capacity Planned I
Steel production for the-first nine If*&bt thru to a finish. “But the
months of this year was only 6% hite caps have been on the line
behind 1946 total production butPf0™ ,^e n
still greatly behind pending and stnke, said IUMSW Nat 1 Repre
expected orders. Layoffs were still Isentative dac^ Gerson.
occurring in plants throughout the I In addition to the SIU meh,
country because of the steel short- I members of the Sailors Union of
age. Ithe Pacific-AFL, have joined the
Last week 20,000 Chrysler work- PUMSW picketlines whenever their
ers in Detroit and another 2500 sh’Ps have come into th,s Port
Willys-Overland employes in Tole-
do were laid off because of the
steel shortage. Similar reports came
from other cities. The United Auto
er$ ip the steel and auto industries.
I
....... -.................•.......
Local 900.
I
production continues at very high
levels in all major lines, with some I
new records being set.”
OPTOMETRIST
Eyes Examined
Glasses Fitted
Office Hours: 9 to 5
Evenings 7 to 9 By
Appointment
502 Market Street
Over Peoples Drug Store
PHONES: 2378 Office
2264-R, Residence
ADV.)
Baltimore (LPA)—Striking Ship-
I
Yard worker8 here swear that they
have an example of AFL-CIO solid-
larity that should be held up to the
I entire nation.
The Industrial Union of Marine
I-&
Shipbuilding Workers started the
Washington—(LPA)— A limited Ifourth month of their strike against
investigation by a special Senate I the Bethlehem Steel shipyards here
Small Business subcommittee into Ion Oct. 26. During their long strug
the nation’s steel shortage may be Igle their picket lines have been re
supplemented by a more compre- I inforced every day by members of
hensive study by the President’s Ithe Seafearers Int’l Union-AFL.
Council of Economic Advisers. I Now the SIU—at a Baltimore port
Predictions by union and gov-1 membership meeting has voted
ernment economists that the steel I that no SIU man should ship out
scarcity” will inevitably lead to I without having first spent time on
industry’s program of “planned Ian IUMSW. picket line.
mass unemployment and depression I The SIU’s vote was hardly ndcel
have aroused the President’s toplsary except as a concrete expres
advisers to the need for an inves-1 sion of solidarity, according to IU
tigation of the nation’s total in-1MSW leaders. Last week a quick
dustrial capacity, it was reported. I survey of 10 IUMSW picket lines
The huge backlog of domestic and I at six in the morning showed doz
foreign needs together with anti-1 ens of the familiar white caps of
cipated future demands will be ex-1 SIU members with their own pla
amined. ft I cards pledging SIU help to see the
l...TT.
I
Workers-CIO asked President Tru-1
man to call an immediate confer-
I
ence of union and corporation lead-
I
I
AIRCRAFT PLANT UPS PAY
I
Fortworth, Texas—(ILNS)—The
I
Consolidated Vultee Aircraft Cor-
I
poration has granted a $1,000,000
I
annual wage increase to the 12,-1
000 employes at its Ft. Worth Di-
I
vision the manager announced. The
I
pay increase is provided for in con-1
tracts negotiated separately with
I
the International Association of
I
Machinists, Aeronautical District
I
Lodge 776, and the Federated In-
I
dependent Texas Union, Aircraft
Michael Curtiz
MATINEE PRICES
Adults_____......
ft
tl.j
1
I Ask for Union Labeled nierchan’
ldlse-
90c
4^ e
Thursday, October 30, 1947
Rail Unions Plan
Political Action
Political action, Lyon said, will
be a major subject of discussion
at a regular meeting of the asso
ciation to be held here on Nov. 12.
Lyon declared the union chieftains
would “probably re-examine the
union’s past policies and methods
to determine what changes are
necessary to be even more effective
in the political field.”
Love is paramount, but money
helps after the honeymoon.
You Can See the Crfeam
ALWAYS USE
tREAM TOP
Milk Bottles
THEY ARE SANITARY
Used Exclusively By
Golden Star
\Dairy
Phone 3200
CERAMIC
4 DAYS COMMENCING MONDAY
WARNER BROS
nwu/nZ fanatical
M^Bx£c^Car^*ft
With
IT* MMMMS UM4NM BNOMV MM
O'OJtl
tip®
STAKING
ZaSuPitts
HOWARDLINDSAY&
RUSSEL CROUSE "J
s'
Washington (LPA)—The nation’s
Railroad Brotherhoods intend to go
into the political field more vigor
ously than in many years. That was i
made clear last week by Executive
Secretary A. E. Lyon of the Rail
way Labor Executives Association,
composed of presidents of 20 rail
unions. J..,
1
EVENING PRICES 1
Tax Included, Tax Included
ADULTS----------$1.25
CHILDREN.............50c CHILDREN ....__ 50c

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