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The potters herald. [volume] (East Liverpool, Ohio) 1899-1982, June 24, 1948, Image 6

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PAGE SIX
‘■/‘■(’J
*1
fl
*1
Vf.
Unions Mourn Loss
Of Sshwellenbach,
Labor Dep’t. Head
^'Washington (LPA)—The death
of Labor Secretary Lewis
Schwellenbach, almost the last of
the New Dealers in President Tru
man's cabinet, was called a “great
loss” to organized labor in state
ments from top union officials last
Week.
Speculation as to Schwrllnnbach’s
rucctw.-or was at a minimum, since
the appointment would only run for
seven months until a new presi
dent takes office and rec a nizes
the cabinet. David Morse, who has
serv*d as acting head of the La
bor Dep’t most of the time since
Schwellenbach became ill early
this year, is expect*d to continue
at least until President Truman’s
return from his national tour. How
ever, Morse is scheduled to spend
neatly all of the next month at
the ILO conference in San Fran
cisco.
“The nation has suffered a se
vere loss,” asserted CIO President
Philip Murray. “In the Senate of
the US, on the federal bench and
his position as Secretary of Labor,
he rendered brilliant, self-sacrific
ing service to his nation and to the
people.”
AFL President William Green
said “Secretary Schwellenbach
strove courageously to bring about
better relations between manage
ment and labor. His efforts to pre
vent the passage of anti-labor leg
islation and to advance social jus
tice legislation were thwarted by
a reactionary Congress which re
taliated by amputating the scope
and authority of the Labor Dep’t.”
Schwellenbach, who held the post
as head of the Labor Dep’t foi
just one month less than three
years, had the unenviable job of
making the change-over from the
very strict wartime regulation of
labor-management relations to u
policy of hands off directly after
the war. He then had to guide the
abor Dep’t thru the fight against
ti e Taft-Hartley law, and adjust
the department to the sharp fund
slashes and anti-labor laws passed
by the 80th Congress.
He took office on July 1, 1945,
following the resignation of Labor
Secretary Frances Perkins who had
served ever since Franklin D.
Ronsevelt became president ’in
.1933.
Schwellenbach, was, from 1935
to 1940, a Democratic member of
the Smate from Washington, and
took an active part in the battles
which shaped such landmarks of
the New Deal as the Wagner Act,
the Fair Labor Standards
farm security and youth
It’s so easy to be thrifty
by saving a few cents each
week until December ’471
Then watch the silver
stacked up into dollars
when you receive your
Christmas Club check I
4/ STILL TIME TO JOIN
First Natioaal
East Liverpool’s Oldest Bask
Member F. D. I. C.
Phone 914
BEFORE
AFTER
I
Act, the
aid pro­
Schwel-
President Truman and
Thrift
ALL IN FAVOR OF A CLOSED SHOP
RAISE THE!R RIGHT HANDS,
AVERY’S WINGS CLIPPED
Chicago (LPA) Montgomery
Ward & Co., changed its by-laws
last week. It looks as tho even
his fellow lords of the mail order
empire have had a little too much
of the notorious Sewell Avery—
the man who has visciously fought
“very attempt to organize Mont
gomery Ward workers. Avery re
mains chairman of the board, but
most operating powers an* now
lodged in President Wilbur Norton.
NEW AFL SLATE IN MICHIGAN
Detroit (LPA)—Joseph O’Laugh
lin and Robert Scott replaced
George M. Dean and John Reid as
president and secretary of the
ichigan Federation of Labor. The
new officers had the support of
Frank Martel, president of the De
troit AFL. Passage of the Bonine
Tripp act, the state’s little Taft
Hartley, had prompted many Mich
igan AFLers to look for a new
state federation leadership.
Furniture—Stoves
Bedding—Curtains
Drapery—Rugs—Carpets
Paint- Appliances
Dinner & Cooking Ware
Seven Floors Of Quality Furniture And All Furnish*
tags To Make A House A Comfortable Home.
established 1880 East Liverpool, Ohio
Convenient Terms
CROOK’S
-THE BEST PLACE TO BUT AFTER ALL”
VOTE 'YES' OR 'NO' WHETHER YOU WANT
A UNION SHOP AND DROP YOUR
SECRET BALLOT IN THE BOX.
79%
lenbach became close friends while
they served together in the Senate,
where they were both known as
members of the young, vigorous
liberal group of “Turks” who were
most active on the floor and in
committee in pressing for New
Deal laws.
In the time between his Senate
term and his recall to Washington
for the cabinet post, Schwellenbach
served as a US District Judge for
the eastern district of Washington
State. H® often told friends in the
Capital that he looked on these as
the happiest days of his public
career, and several of the prece
dent-making decisions from SchweL
lenbach’s bench are viewed as im
portant steps in protecting the “lit
tle men” of the northwest from
the power and lumber interests.
Schwellenbach served in World
War I as an infantry private, and
in 1922 served as state comman
der of the American Legion.
YOU BETTER
VOTE RIGHT.
... .___ Isettle.” Remember this when the
of dll w.rkm favor Ihlt rhona.. I opcratol.s. pub|jcjty barragc
GOP LIES ABOUT LABOR—lhe Republican Natl CommitteeUMW is plotting a strike
issued a special union-smearing pamphlet which is intended to begins It was the owners not the
cartoon'^shown lunion, wh*ch terminated the 1948
has
xhow how much better pff the workers are since passage of the Taft
Hartley Act. The misleading “before” and “after”
here has been vigorously repudiated by the votes of workers in 6,COO [negotiations.
union shop elections conducted by NLRB. In more than 98 per cent I Operators’ spokesman
of these elections, employes voted overwhelmingly in favor of the (O’Neil rather ineptly
union shop.
OBITUARIES I
g* •----------------------------lhear
Ran unions Win
Congress Benefits!
Mine Owners
|ftre Ready To
Alibi Lockout
Maximum pensions and annuities (tending that the majority of the
uflder the new legislation go up (board has no right to put it into
(operation without his consent.
was
an|lBEW VICTOR OVER CIO
th«|lN BARGAINING ELECTIO1N
ra Pittsburgh. The International
from $120 to 144 a month.
The unanimous enactment
made possible as a result of
agreement reached between
Railroad Brotherhoods and
went along with the 20 per cent
managements. The managements
boost in benefits, and the unions
Flowers
THE POTTERS HERALD/ EAST LIVERPOOL, OHIO
Washington (LPA)—With Fed
eral Mediation Director Cyrus
(Ching’s statement last week that
Ibis office has failed to reopen
(contract negotiations between the
(United Mine Workers and bitu
|minous coal owners, talk of a new
|anti-strike injunction was heard
(in Washington.
No better demonstration can be
(found of the injustice of the in
|junction method of settling la
|bjr-management disputes,
|men say. It is clear
(will be no mine
(out, caused by
(may well take
|tion, however,
(primarily at the NMW.
union
that there
but a lock
obstinacy,
An injunc-
strike,
owner
place.
would be aimed
President John L. Lewis
clear last week that the
willing to do everything
be asked of it to avert a
UMW
Imade it
lunion is
Ithat can
Iwork stoppage. He offered to ex
itend the present contract past the
I June 30 expiration date if the op
erators will agree to immediate ac
tivation of the pension fund whose
outlines they approved a year ago.
The union takes the position that
the fund should be used to fill com
mitments made under the 1946 re
tirement plan, as well as provide
the retirement pay stipulated in
the 1947 contract.
Lewis said last week that the
coal owners who walked out of
contract talks “apparently have
elected to fight in 1948 and not
MILTON C. BROTHERS Iment may lead us to believe that
Minerva, Ohio. Milton Clay Ian agreement may be reached”
Brothers, 61, died Monday Juneltipped the owners’ hands.
14, at Aultman Hospital after al Since no date was even hinted
short illness. He resided in Pekin las to when the owners will be will
and was associated with the Cronin ling to talk again with the UMW,
China Co., at the time of his death, lit is almost certain that they in-
Bom in Robertsville, he was a Itend to stall past the 1947 contract
life resident of this vicinity. He lexpiration date, June 30. This is
was a member of the Minerva la threat of a lockout of the coal
Christian church and Local 70 ofldiggers who traditionally do not
the National Brotherhood of Opera- Iwork without a contract.
tive Potters.
I
Charles
laid the
ground work for the campaign last
week when he said “further meet
ings at this time may mislead the
public and the government into
thinking that an agreement may
be reached.” His announcement
that “we are recessing the ses
Isions until some further develop-
Lewis announced a meeting of
Surviving are two sons, Gerald Ithe UMW’s 200-man wage policy
C. of the home and James C. oflcommittee next week to determine
Brooklyn, N. Y. a brother, James lunion policy.
D. of Van Nuys, Calif. a half-bro-1 Ching took his negative report
ther, Marion Brothers of RD 1 and Ito the White House. President Tru
a stepsister, Mrs. Lilliam Richards Iman was expected to name a fact
of Malvern. Ifinding board to study the dispute
Funeral services were held at limmediately. The existence of such
2 p. m. Friday at the Dillon-McCre-la board paves the way for the at
ery Funeral Home in charge ofltorney general’s applying for an
Rev. William J. Clague. Burial |80-day anti-strike injunction.
was made in Liberty cemetery. I Meanwhile Judge T. Allan
|Goldsborough was preparing to
arguments in Ezra Van
Horn’s suit against Lewis and
|Sen. Styles Bridges, his co-trus-
ees of the 1947 pension fund. The
|mine owners’ nominee is seeking
Washington (LPA) Railroadk’ourt action to keep the other two
workers won the only major in-ltrustees from paying over-age
crease in social security benefits Iminers the $100-a-month pensions
voted by this Congress. |t° which they are entitled under
Both the Senate and House un- |the contract.
animously enacted an amendment I Sen- Bridges has submitted an
to the Railroad Retirement Actl«ffidavit accusing Van Horn of
boosting pensions to retired rail-(consistently obstructing the work
roa workers by 20 per cent effec-lof the panel. He says that he and
tive August 1. The same increase ll^ewis made nine different motions
applies to benefits payable to wid-|to put the fund into operation, and
ows of railroaders with childrenIVan Horn opposed every one of
under 18. |theni. Now the owners’ man is con-
Brotherhood of Electrical Workers
Jwon out over a rival CIO union in
“okeyed” a'sliding**scale'’induction |a o,,ective bargaining election held
in unemployment insurance taxes |bY the National Labor Relations
paid by the rail carriers. (Board among employes of the Du
____________________ |quesne Light Company.
When we start out looking fori ln 3-2 vote the workers chose
excitement, we nearly always .end |thv to represent them in ne
up in trouble. (gotiations with the employer. The
Ifinal tally of votes released by-the
NLRB showed 966 in favor of the
AFL union against 641 for the
CIO affiliate.
WHEN
WORDS
FAIL
Say
It
With
Flowers
NOTICE OF HEARING
The Township Trustees of
Liverpool Township, Columbi
ans County, Ohio, hereby give
notice that on the 9th day of
June, 1948, they filed a Peti
tion in the Common Pleas
Court to transfer the sum of
Two Thousand Five Hundred
Dollars ($2,500.00) from the
General Fund to the Road and
Bridge Fund.
Said action will be for hear
ing on said Petition before the
Common Pleas Court in the
Court House at Lisbon, Ohio,
on the 16th day of July, 1948,
or as soon thereafter as con
venient for the Court.
i
i
4 -I .• :t «.!/'
John, Greta, Betty, Jack
FROM AMERICAN
ffL
W 1 -'..j
MMSW Still Not Complying
Denver (LPA)—The Mine, Mill
& Smelter Workers has decided,
at an enlarged session of its Nat’l
Wage Policy Committee, to con
tinue to refuse to comply with the
Taft-Hartley law. Signing the non
Communist affidavits, the major
ity decided after two days of hot
debate, “would solve none of our
problems.” Board member Ken
Eckert of Cleveland pressed for
T-H compliance, and was support
ed by Vice President Wesley Ma
dill.
ENOUGH! STOP!
Washington (LPA)—The Inter
national Teamster, official maga
zine of the Int’l Brotherhood oi
Teamsters-AFL this month advis
ed its member locals not to fil
any more copies of the Interna
tional Constitution with the Laboi
Dep’t in compliance with the Taft
Hartley law. Seems Director Wil
liam Conn&Ily has returned to the
IBT several hundred extra copies
which were sent in by local unions
Fla. Labor-Hater Licked
Tallahassee (LPA)— Labor-hat
ing Tom Watson, who as attorney
general of Florida stumped all
over the south and southwest for
his favorite “right to work” laws,
went down to defeat in the De
mocratic primary runoffs here last
week. Victor in the race for s
place on the state supreme court
was Judge Frank Hobson, who had
the support of organized labor.
Dicks Trail Customers
Denver (LPA)— The Colorado
Labor Advocate has warned it
readers not to be alarmed if thej
ar* followed by armed guard
while shopping at the May Co.
here. “It is an even bet,” says th*
Advocate, “that you are being mis
taken for a representative of Re
tail Clerks Local 464.’ Members o
organized labor had cause to com
plain during the last two weeks
after exchanging smiles or hello,
with a friendly clerk, that thej
found themselves trailed thruou
the store by burley, gun-totinj
May Co. gumshoe men.”
AFL Airs Campaign Issum
Washington (LPA)— The AFI
is sponsoring a series of four po
litically significant radio debate:
during the month of June. The
programs will be aired each Sun
day on NBC network from 1 tc
1:30 p. m. (E. D. T.). The Demo
cratic and Republican national
committees are cooperating in the
forums.
Rail Workers Approach Congress
Washington (LPA)—Three rail
road brotherhoods whose dispute
with the carriers is unsettled, de
spite their bargaining efforts, a
Taft-Hartley injunction, and “gov
ernment seizure” of the roads all
became subjects for Congression
al action last week. Rail labor
i
LIVERPOOL TOWNSHIP
TRUSTEES,
By: Simon C. Hall, Clerk.
Fl
.Z V
LABOR—The wife of a member of the
Greek Confederation of Labor receives a concrete expression of hands
across the sea—a CARE package sent by the AFL. CARE is urging
all trade union members in this country to send food packagegs to
workers in the same industry overseas.
IN THE LABOR LIMELIGHT
chiefs talked with conservative
Sen. Robert A. Taft (R., Ohio)
and liberal Sen. Wayne Morse (R.,
Ore.). Taft promised to see if he
can budge the rail bosses and said
there might have to be a Congres
sional investigation.
LABOR MEN IN ECA
Washington (LPA)— Economic
Cooperation Administrator Paul
man has named Clinton Golden,
CIO, and Bert Jewell, AFL, as his
principal labor advisors in work
ing out the Marshall plan. Both
have long backgrounds of service
the labor movement. Another
mportant appointment was that of
1FL economist Boris Shiskin as
abor division chief on “roving
Ambassador” Averill Harriman’s
staff in Europe.
Strikes Symptoms Of Injustice
Springfield, Mo. (LPA)—On the
Town Meeting of the Air Program
last week, Emil Mazey, secretary
of the United Auto Workers said.
“Strikes are merely a surface
symptom of injustices that lie at
.he very heart of our society. It
is to these injustices that we
must attend if we want to spare
jurselves the embarrassment of
suffering from their symptoms.”
He blasted Congress and leaders
of industry who have been more
interested in “rolling
bor movement than
the cost of living.”
FOR A CHANGE, SERVE
BETSY ROSS SLICED VIENNA
Enriched with Vitamin and Iron
back the la
rolling back
Sidetracked
Union Shop Change
Washington (LPA)— Congress’
Joint Committee on Labor Man
igement Relations decided this
veek against action on the Ives
Landis bill. Pro-labor members
’eared that the repeal of the union
hop NLRB election clause of
Taft-Hartley would give Taft
lartleyites too easy a way to re
ord a modifying vote, if it didn’t
pen the door for vicious anti-la
»or amendments to the 1947 act
vhich industry has been urging,
nstead the committee is telling
JLRB how to speed up its conduct
the union security contract au
thorization elections.
US Trains European Workers
Washington (LPA) Acting
Secretary of Labor David Morse
said last week that William Pat
terson, director of the Dept’s Bu
reau of Apprenticeship has left
for Europe to study ways of help
ing France, Italy and Greece train
more skilled workers. The Dep’t
is planning a program of training
some European workers in the
US and helping with the teaching
of others in their home countries.
Another contemplated move is the
opening of the US to European
trade leaders for study of the Am
erican labor movement.
_______________
Does every insurance man look
with grave concern upon the finan
cial and family affairs of every
prospective customer?
Rutgers Sessions Mark
New Extension Service,
18th On-Campus Meet
New Brunswick (LPA)—For the
18th straight year, the Rutgers
University campus here has been
the scene of the week-long Insti
tute of Labor sponsored by the N.
J. Federation of Labor and the
Workers’
than 3C0
men and
dance.
Education Bureau. More
union and management
women were in atten-
The institute this year marked
the successful completion of the
first series of extension classes for
unionists, authorized and financed
by the state legislature as part
of the state university’s extension
program. Thousands of workers in
communities all
have taken part
which are under
Irvine Kerrison.
over the state
in the classes,
the direction of
Plenty of opportunity for discus
sion from the floor was permitted,
and the institute saw several vig
orous discussions on the Taft
Hartley law in which management
spokesmen who defended parts of
the law were corrected by union
men—such as members of the Int’l
Typographical Union who have
felt the T-H shackles.
Two Sessions were marked by
discussions between labor and man
agement spokesmen from the same"
plant. Business Agent Charles E.
Hughes of Textile Workers-CIO
Local 122 discussed with Vice-presi
dent Harold Zulof of the Alexander
Smith Carpet Co., their mutual
problems.
■ft
Frank Pucci, president of Local
111, Chemical Workers-AFL, told
the story of the 10-year-old union
at the Calco division of American
Cyanamid Co., while R. P. Fisher,
supervisor of labor relations for
the company, pointed to the fact
that the company first tried to bust
the union, then became reconciled
to having it in the plant.
A strike in 1939, Pucci said, “was
a good thing for our relations, just
as it’s good to have the men from
the plant sit down with some brass
hat like Fisher and get a load off
their minds.” When the union won
the strike, labor and management
k, JUHCES OOOMICH U* ALBERT HACKETT
mwmi,
Thursday, June 24, 1948’
J*---------------------:-
spokesmen had a luncheon meeting,
Pucci said, where they first started
to hammer out their present amic
able—though not always agreeing
—policies.
President James McDevitt of the
Pennsylvania Federation of Labor
warned the conferees that the evil
pattern of controlling labor by the
use of injunctions was again on the
increase in the US, and said the
Pennsylvania pattern where at
present there are doxens of injunc
tions hanging over unions—is typi
cal. These injunctions fail to obtain
labor-management peace because
they try to substitute force for rea
son, McDevitt maintained.
On the lighter side of the insti
tute, the program featured a fac
ulty-labor baseball game, swimming
in the Rutgers pool, and songs by'
a chorus organized by the Int’l La
dies’Garment Workers Union. Con
ferees also saw the first showing
of a film strip on how unemploy
ment compensation works, produced
and distributed by the Institute at
Rutgers as part of its services to
the labor movement in the state.
Sentner Expelled From Local
St. Louis (LPA)—William Sent
ner, Communist president of Dis
trict, 8 of the United Electrical
Workers has been expelled from
his own local by a membership vote.
Local 1102 tried Sentner on char
ges of using the union to further
Communist political ends and found
him guilty. Sentner continues, how
ever, to occupy the district, post.
Harvester Workers Win Raise
Chicago (LPA) Officials of
three locals of the United Farm
Equipment Workers announced last
week that they will accept the of
fer of the John Deere farm ma
chinery company to raise piece
work wages 9c an hoilr, and hourly
wages 13c. United Auto Workers,
has however, rejected the offer so
far as its members in Deere plants
are concerned.
Saving
OF EAST LIVERPOOL, OHIO
CERAMIC
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