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The potters herald. [volume] (East Liverpool, Ohio) 1899-1982, March 24, 1949, Image 5

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Thursday, March 24, 1949
Four Independent Unions
Ask House Labor Group
For Return To Wagner Act
Washington (LPA)—The lead
ers of four independent unions,
two of them among the nation’s
largest, appeared before the House
Labor Committee this week to urge
that the Taft-Hartley act be killed
once and for all and that the Wag
ner act be re-enacted with amend
ments.
They were Pres. Harvey Brown,
of the Int’l Association of Machin
ists Pres. Joseph A.. Bierne, of
the Communications Workers of
America Pres. Carl Brown, of the
Foreman’s Association of America,
and Don Mahon, executive vice
president of the Confederated
Unions of,America, composed of
small local independent groups.
All four pointed out to the sub
committee qf the Labor committee
now holding hearings on a new
labor law just how severely the
Taft-Hartley law has restricted
and hurt collective bargaining
since it went into effect almost two
years ago.
“I am convinced,” JAM President
Brown asserted, “that those who
designed and sponsored the T-H
law deliberately intended for its
provisions and restrictions to
strangle and deplete the treasuries
of labor unions thereby destroying
Mhe rights of organization and col
^lective action. I earnestly believe
that the light of American freedom
and opportunity which we proudly
boast of at home and abroad, will
become dim unless this labor res
tricting law is promptly repealed.”
In closing his long testimony re
lating the unnecessary legal
trouble the I AM has had under
T-H, Brown took a parting shot
at the widespread campaign of em
ployers to keep the ban on political
spending by labor unions. He said
he was convinced that those who
fear the political power of labor
unions are also fearful of the poli
tical power of the people general
ly.
CWA President Bierne also de
tailed his union’s difficulties under
the T-H act, and asked the sub
committee to assure a return to
the philosophy of the Wagner act.
He endorsed the Administration
bill’s provision making it possible
for emergency boards to not only
“investigate” disputes but also
“make suggestions for settling
controversies.” Even further, he
said, the new labor law ought to
.. carry a provision empowering. the
emergency boards to call in as ad
ditional parties to the dispute any
corporation which appears to. con
trol the policies of the company
engaged in the dispute. Such a
provision, Bierne said, is the only
answer to the problems his union,
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SPENDING later
as well as others, faces in dealing
with the numerous telephone com
panies that are all actually part of
the parent American Telephone &
Telegraph Co.
One of the most eloquent argu
ments for return of the Wagner
act was given the committee by
Pres. Carl Brown, of the Foreman’s
Association of America. He told
the committee by actual example
of the difficulties that faced the
thousands of foremen in the big
plants of the country before the
Wagner act, how the right to bar
gain given them by the Wagner
act had given them such hope, and
how the T-H act had so clearly
taken away all those rights, re
turning them to the dark dpys of
years ago.
In most plants today, Brown as
serted, the foremen are often find
ing themselves in worse working
conditions that the production em
ployes and without any grievance
machinery at all to attempt to cor
rect those faults. 1
Managements’ most interesting
witness as the second week of
hearings got under way was Ger
ard Reilly, a former member of
the Nat’l Labor Relations Board,
and also a former counsel with the
Senate Labor Committee who as
sisted in writing the Taft-Hartley
law. He is now employed as a
Washington lobbyist for the Inland
Daily Press Association, the Print
ing Industry of America, and the
General Electric Corp.
He told the subcommittee the
passage of the Administration’s
bill would be a “disservice to free
trade unionism, to individual work
ers, to employers, and to the whole
public.” Committee members had
been advised, however, that Reilly,
in addressing a convention of the
Inland Press group two weeks ago,
said repeal of the T-H act would
do away “with all our efforts for
the past two years.” So there
little doubt where he stands.
was
Unionists From
Upper South
Visit Capitol
the
W a shington (LPA)—What
Senate’s talkathon was doing to
President Truman’s Fair Deal pro
gram was brought home last week
to 47 men and women from neigh
boring states who came here for
four days to learn what happens
in Congress.
“So this is what’s happened to
our November mandate,” one of
ficer of a Textile Workers local
commented grimly. Now back in
their home towns to report on what
they saw’ and heard, the 47 came
from .textile communities in Vir
ginia, Maryland, and West Vir
ginia. They spent four days here.
“There’s been so much that it’ll
take the whole of a meeting, and
even more, to report,” said John
Jennings, a shop chairman for
Local 549 in Lynchburg.
A delegate from Front Royal,
Va. asserted that President Tru
man ought certainly to go out into
the country and report on what’s
happening to his Fair Deal. And a
fellow from Baltimore added,
“We’re just a handful, but we’ll
have a whole lot to say when we
get back. I think we can finish the
job in 1950.”
Into the four days were packed
sessions with members of Congress
from the three states, meetings
with union lobbyists and PAC of
ficials, a tour of the Capital, Labor
and Social Security buildings, and
long hours at hearings of the
House Labor Committee on Taft
Hartley.
Furniture Stoves
Bedding- Curtains
Drapery—Rugs—Carpets
Paint-- Appliances
Dinner & Cooking Ware
Seven Floors Of Quality Furniture And AU Furnish
ings To Make A House A Comfortable Home.
Established 1880 East Liverpool, Ohio
Convenient Terms
CROOK’S
“THE BEST PLACE TO BUT AFTER ALL”
KERRY
TREE
The passing of Frank Morrison
is worthy of much more than pass
ing note.
The headlines have been written.
The last obsequies have been held.
Frank Morrison has been laid to
that long rest from which no cred
ible account has ever returned.
But the influence of Frank Mor
rison remains and it is right that
it should remain.
To those who do not know, let it
be said that Frank Morrison was
for 43 years secretary of the Am
erican Federation of Labor, 28
years during the presidency of the
late Samuel Gompers and for 15
years under the presidency of
William Green. During several of
the latter years he was treasurer
as well.
Here was a man who did much
to put the impress of character
upon the American trade union
movement during the years that
made up the formative period—the
impress of a fine and upright char
acter.
There were those who, during
the latter years, spoke of “old
Frank”.
And there came a time, as some
will recall, when it began to be
said that it was getting pretty near
time to retire “old Frank”—he had
been there long enough.
So, there came a time when “old
Frank” was retired to the position
of secretary emeritus, with a re
tirement pay which the Federation
could well afford to pay.
It was a rather graceless per
formance, that retirement of “old
Frank”, who didn’t know of his im
pending retirement until perhaps
less than 30 minutes before it was
announced to the world.
Those who witnessed the “retire
ment”, as Frank Morrison stood
upon the A of convention stage
are not likely ever to forget the
combined look
daze in his eyes
inevitable.
of
as
challenge and
he accepted the
Always there was dignity about
Frank Morrison and never was it
more evident than upon that day
of final service in office. The great
square shoulder^ were as square as
ever.
There was no show of bitterness,
or of anger. There was just a quiet
dignity, above assault and above
injury.
there has been a dignity
the years of retirement.
Morrison had a true sense
meaning of the job of sec
and never did he trespass
And
about
Frank
of the
retary
outside the precincts of that job.
Here was a marvelous team-mate
for the imaginative Samuel Gomp
ers, who loved to plan and to philo
sophize and to plunge into tilts,
forensic or otherwise.
Here was a secretary who kept
his side of the job in order and who
saw to it that the
straight. Here was,
great secretary.
records ran
actually, a
One way to measure a man is to
find the opinion of those who, in
their work, are his subordinates.
Through all the years the men
and women who were subordinate
to Frank Morrison w’ere his most
ardent admirers, serving with him
nnd Iqying the chance to do it.
It must not be thought that this
man lacked a sense of humor. It
must not be thought that here was
one devoid of great emotions.
Far from that. Here was a man
with a delightful sense of humor,
though not of the boisterous kind.
And he could not have been a great
secretary of the labor movement
as we have had it and known it,
had he not possessed warm anti
deep emotions. He just didn’t go
spreading them around. But they
did run deep.
Well, Frank Morrison has gone,
after a long and significant life.
And there will be those who know
that a mark for good has been left
upon this world, in the groove
which was his pathway through
this tortuous vale.
for-
Goodbye Frank—and godd
tune betide you.
Maryland Legislature
Passes Most Drastic
Anti-Communist Law
Annapolis, Md. (LPA) Mary
land’s legislature has overwhelm
ingly passed the most drastic anti
Communist law of any state, pro
viding that if any person even
knowingly joins a ‘subversive’ or
ganization he can be fined $5000 or
put in jail for five years.
The law will outlaw the Com
munist party, set up a special at
torney general for subversive acti
vities and require loyalty oaths of
all state, county and city employes.
Persons conspiring to overthrow
the government are liable to 20
years in jail or a $20,000 fine.
We can live without political
speeches and economists’ statistics
but where is the. worker who can
maintain union wages without buy­
ing Union Laber goods?
THE POTTERS HERALD, EAST LIVERPOOL, OIHO
Comment On
World Events
Relentless religious prosecution
ordered by the Kremlin to remove
the remaining resistance force to
absolute Communist control over
their European satellites has arous
ed moral indignation which is
growing with each new attack.
This final outrage is probably pre
liminary to integrating the sate
llite countries into the USSR, thus
completing the conquest of these
peoples.
This conquest bl nations began
with occupation by Soviet armies
during the war and was facilitated
by Moscow tactics to delay treaties
at the end of the war until Com
munist agents were ready to take
over the governments of the sub
jugated countries.
Likewise the great Communist
victory in China was facilitated by
Communist deceit and treachery in
using the equipment surrendered
by the Japanese armies in addition
to Lend-Lease equipment to arm
Communist rebels against efforts
to organize a national Chinese
government. The China victory
opens up the rich resources of Asia
to Communist conquest which
would end the hope of self-govern
ment for Asian peoples.
Western democracy cannot stand
“planless” before this growing
threat of Communist world aggres
sion. Communist leaders have pub
licly declared world conquest as
their ultimate objective and have
directed all their activities to that
end. We have been docile and in
effective both because we thought
the purpose to be too reactionary
to be realized in our existing civil
ization and because it required so
much deceit and perverted think
ing on the part of so many persons.
Organized labor has always been
the first target of the Moscow
agents. The unions in the United
States turned on them and prevent
ed them from getting control of
A organizations. Communist
agents tried again in the Thirties,
during the period of rapid union
organization, with more success.
But the newer unions also sensed
their danger and are driving the
Moscow agents out.
have within
aided in the
Since the war we
our limited resources
revival of free trade unions in
Western Europe. Our nation has
aided in the restoration of the
European economy to be supple
mented by the North Atlantic
fense alliance.
But this is not enough. We must
devise and operate defense against
cold war tactics to prevent further
aggression and to enable these
countries to defend or regain their
freedom. There is urgent need to
enlarge our concepts of offense
against freedom And peace. This is
essentially a technical problem in
volving protection against Moscow
agents operating as secret or open
members of the Communist Party
and the espionage conducted under
cover of diplomatic and consular
privileges. It involves safeguard
ing education and the press against
those who would make them sub
servient to control of the Kremlin.
It necessitates an alert and inform
ed citizenry able to detect Com
munist .tactics and operations, sup
plemented by legal provisions to
deal with their efforts.
Common danger requires cooper
ation of democratic nations to
work out the tactics of defense as
well as world cooperation in de
fense of human freedom against
the cold war. Danger to one i.s men
ace to all. We can bring nations
and peoples to the bar of justice
for offenses in a cold war as we did
in a fighting war. But most of ail
we should mobilize the growing
moral indignation into a crusade
against religious persecution and
human torture.
Congress Enjoys
Freshman’s Reply
To Rankin Hate
Washington (LPA) First
speech on the floor of the House
by new Congressman Eugene Mc
Carthy, 32-year old Democrat from
Minnesota, was a brief and telling
answer to one of the tirades by
Rep. John Rankin (D, Miss.) which
are old stuff to more hardened
members of the House.
“On Friday of last week,” Mc
Carthy said, “the gentleman from
Mississippi addressed the House.
He prefaced his remarks with art
excellent quotation to this effect,
that ‘while the lamp holds out to
bum, the vilest sinner may return.’
He went on then to commend the
legislature of the state of Minne
sota for having voted down the
Fair Employment Practice Act.
“I would like to inform the
Speaker that repentance in Minne
sota followed fast, and on Friday,
almost at the time when the gentle
man from Mississippi was address
ing the House, Senate Committee
of the state legislature of Minne
sota reconsidered the FEPC and
voted favorably on the measure.
“There is joy over the one that
has returned the lamp still bums
for others.”
(Vote for Ona)
DUFFY. JAMES M. (Tomer)
Load Union No. 7*_____
FINLAY, LARRY (Jiggorman)
Local Union No. E—* UverpooL Ohio
JOHNSTON, HARRY S. (Docorating
Local Union No. 124 East Liverpool Ohio
WHIPPIER, NORMAN (Liner)
Local Union No. 124 East Liverpool Ohio
FOR SECRETARY-TREASURER
(Vote for Ona)
CALHOON, P. K. (Kilnman)
Local Union No. 9 East Liverpool Ohio
JONES, ED. J. (Caster)
Local Union No. 44...
JORDAN, CHAS. F.
Local Union No. 59
PAKER. LAWRENCE F. (Kilnman)
Local Union No. 113 Loo
SALSBERRY, GEORGE M. (Jiggonnan)
Local Union No. 24 Wellsville,
SHUMAN, LEWIS (Turner)
Local Union No. 10..
CURRY, ED. (Decorating Kilnman)
Local Union No. 124 East Liverpool Ohio
WHEATLEY, E. (Kilnman)
Local Union No. 9 East Liverpool Ohio
FOR SECOND VICE PRESIDENT
(Vote for Ona)
CARTWRIGHT, ALFRED R. (Tumor)
Load Union No. 10.—. East Liverpool Ohio
GARNER, WILLARD (Handler)
Local Union No. 10 East Liverpool Ohio
HULL, FRANK (Decorating Kilnman)
Local Union No. 124 East Liverpool Ohio
WEST, HAROLD (Liner)
Local Union No. 124..
FOR THIRD VICE PRESIDENT
(Vote for Ono)
ARMSTRONG, CLAIR (Decorating Kilnman)
Local Union No. 124 East
BOSSEN, WILLIAM F. (Tumor)
Local Union No. 10
SLAVEN, JAMES (Liner)
Local Union No. 124..
ZIMMER. CHARLES (Sanitary Caster)
Local Union No. 45 Trenton,
FOR FIFTH VICE PRESIDENT
(Vote for Ono)
DEVLIN, ARTHUR (Packer)
Local Union No. 114
HIBBS, WILLIAM (Tumor)
Local Uiion No. 35
PERDUNN, FRED (Caster)
Local Union No. 35
FOR SIXTH VICE PRESIDENT
(Vote for Ono)
APPLEGATE, FRANK M. (Kilnfiroman)
Local Union No. 59 Sobring. Ohio
BARKER. BEN. F. (Jiggerman)
Local Union No. 12 ..East Liverpool Ohio
CAMPBELL, WILLIAM J. (Jiggennan)
Local Union No. 103 Erwin, Tenn.
COFFEY, JAMES (Kilnman)
Local Union No. 122
DALES. FRANK (Castor)
Local Union No. 4
HAMILTON, B. R. (Doc) (Tumor)
Local Union No. 10 -—East Liverpool
STARK. WILLIAM H. (Kilnman)
Local Union No. 42
SNYDER. HENRY (Sanitary Castor)
Local Union No. 133 ■—Now Castle, Pa.
JTVIDEN, FLOYD (Kilnfiroman)
Local Union No. 130 East Liverpool Ohio
LLEWELLYN, JOSIAH (Dipper)
Local Union No. 201 —Huntington Park, Calif.
COBB, CHAS. M. (Dish Jiggonnan)
Local Union No. 108...
SAMPLE BALLOT
The following is a replica of the official ballot for primary election of National Of
ficers and Delegates to the American Federation of Labor Convention, which in accord
ance with law, must be printed in each issue of the Potters Herald during the entire vot
ing period of the primary election.
FOR PRESIDENT FOR SEVENTH VICE PRESIDENT
.Buffalo, N. Y.
Sabring Ohio
.Sobring, Ohio
Calif.
Ohio
East UverpooL Ohio
FOR FIRST VICE PRESIDENT
(Vote for Ono)
Ohio
.East UvocpooL
Ohio
Liverpool.
Liverpool Ohio
Ohio
Liverpool
East
FOR FOURTH VICE PRESIDENT
(Vote for Ono)
PHILLIPS, VERNE D. (Sanitary Caster)
Local Union No. 50 Camden,
I.
N.
J.
N.
I.
..Trenton, N.
J.
N.
.Trenton,
...Trenton, N. J.
Ohio
.Cambridge,
Ohio
East Liverpool
Ohio
Ohio
.Salem.
.Bodford, Ohio
(Vote for Ona)
BEVAN, DAVID (Castor)
Local Union No.
BOWMAN. WILLIAM C. (Sanitary Caster)
Local Union No. 133 New Castle, Pa.
BRATT, NORMAN H. (Jiggorman)
Local Union No. 24 Wellsville,
CUBLEY, THOMAS A. (Handler)
Local Union No. 10 East Liverpool
DESMOND, T. J. (Dipper)
Local Union No. 70
DIGMAN, GUY V. (Jiggerman)
Local Union No. 12 East UvorpooL
DORFF, JOHN A. (Art Ware Caster)
Local Union No. 178 Sebring,
GUKISON, G. E~ Sr. (Tamer)
Local Union No. 10 East Liverpool
HOUGH, JAMES LUTHER (Kilnman)
Local Union No. 9 East Liverpool Ohio
MORROW, ROBERT (Warehouseman)
Local Union No. 42 Salem.
SULLIVAN, JAMES (Castor)
Local Union No. 44
SULUVAN, O. (Pat) (Kilnman)
Local Union No. 201 Huntington Park,
WILLARD, WILBERT (Warehouseman)
Local Union No. 86 East UverpooL Ohio
FOR EIGHTH VICE PRESIDENT
(Vote for Ono)
BRUNT, GEORGE (Caster)
Local Union No. 4 East Liverpool Ohio
CHADWICK, JOSHUA (Jiggennan)
Local Union No- 12 East UverpooL
DANIEL, WALTER G. (Docorating Kilnman)
Local Union No. 124 East UverpooL
HALL, LUTHER (Jiggerman)
Local Union No. 12 East Liverpool
HAMILTON. JOHN W. (Jiggerman)
Local Union No. 44 ...
LAWTON, SAMUEL (Tumor)
Local Union No. 24 Wellsville,
USK. FLOYD (Tally) (Handler)
Local Union No. 99
DIGMAN, GUY V. (Jiggerman)
Local Union No. 12 East UverpooL
EDWARDS, ABE (Caster)
Local Union No. 70 Minerva.
PAGE
Clarksburg, W. Va.
BOSO, CHARLES B. (Kilndrawor)
Local Union No. 17 East UverpooL Ohio
Ohio
Ohio
Mmorvo, Ohio
Ohio
Ohio
Ohio
Ohio
Sobring, Ohio
Calif.
Ohio
Ohio
Ohio
Ohio
.Sebring,
Ohio
Grafton. W. Va.
SCHAEFER, GEORGE (Caster)
Local Union No. 4. East UverpooL Ohio
SIMMONS, EARL (Trackman)
Local Union No. 99
Grafton, W. Va.
WILSON, CUFFORD (Kilnfireman)
Local Union No. 130 East UverpooL Ohio
FOR DELEGATES TO A. F. L.
CONVENTION
(Vote for One East of the Allegheny Mountains)
BROWN, JOSEPH D. (Packer)
Local Union No. 35
SIMPSON, JOHN (Caster)
Local Union No. 45
..Trenton, N. I.
...Trenton. N. J.
(Vote for Ono West of the Allegheny Mountains)
BERRY, WILLIAM (Decorating Kilnman)
Local Union No. 192 Sobring,
BROWN, HAZEL (Liner)
Local Union No. 121
BROADBENT. ROY (Kilnman)
Local Union No. 9 East UverpooL
CAMPBELL. FRANK (Jiggorman)
Local Union No. 122.. Cambridge,
GANT, PEARL EDWARD (Kilnfireman)
Local Union No. 130 East UverpooL Ohio
KILLINGER, DAN (Jiggerman)
Local Union No. 122
USK, FLOYD (Tally) (Handler)
Local Union No. 98
MAMRACK, JOHN M. (Packer)
Local Union No. 51
MANDLEY. FURM A. (Packer)
Local Union No. 70
McDEVITT, EDW. L. (Dipper)
Local Union No. 18 East
O'DOWD, JOHN W. (Handler)
Local Union No. 113-----------------Los
PENNINGTON, FRED (Caster)
Local Union No. 113 los
SELL THEODORE (Ted) (Jiggerman)
Local Union No. 12-----------------East
VAN FOSSAN PAUL W. (Dipper)
Local Union No. 18---------- —East
WARD, JAMES (Warehouseman)
Local Union No. 86-------------- —East
Ohio
Ohio
Sebring,
Ohio
Ohio
Ohio
Ohio
Cambridge, Ohio
.Grafton, W. Va.
Canonsburg, Pa.
.Minerva, Ohio
Liverpool Ohio
Angelos, Calif.
Angeles, Calif.
Ohio
Liverpool
Ohio
Liverpool
Ohio
Liverpool

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