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The Republican journal. [volume] (Belfast, Me.) 1829-current, July 30, 1908, Image 2

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The Republican Journal
BELFAST. THURSDAY, JULY 30, 1908.
~ FOR PRESIDENT,
WILLIAM li. TAFT
OF OHIO.
FOR VICE PRESIDENT,
JANES S. SHERMAN
OF NEW YORK.
FOR GOVERNOR,
HON. BERT M. FERNALD
OF POLAND,
For Representative to Congress,
EDWIN C. BURLEIGH
OF AUGUSTA.
WALDO COUNTY NOMINATIONS.
Fur Senator,
IS. F. COI.COKD of Searsport
For Sheriff,
AMDS F. C A KEETON of Winterpoii
For Judge of Frobate,
GEORGE E. JOHNSON of Belfasl
For Register of Frobate,
CHARLES P. HAZELTINE of Belfasi
For County Attorney,
H. C. BFZZE1X of Searspori
For County Treasurer,
JOHN S. DAVIDSON of Belfasi
For County Commissioner,
GL.OI.GF E. HUY ANT of Freedoir
OLD LINE DEMOCRATS BOLT.
Predicted that Maryland Will Give Tafi
30,000 Majority.
Dr. James E. Sullivan, a prominent cot
tager at Xarragansett Pier and a presi
dential elector on the Parker ticket foi
Rhode Island four years ago, upon learning
of the nomination of \Y. J. Bryan as the
Democratic presidential candidate, ge.ee
out a statement declaring his intention to
vote for William U. Taft in November.
Eugene W. Leake, Democratic member of
Congress fir the ninth district of New
Jersey, has written to Win. II. Taft an
nouncing that he will vote fur Mr. Taft and
offering his services to the Republican
nominee during the campaign. In his letter
Mr. Leake makes this statement: “The
conservative citizens of this country, who
are neither reactionary nor the representa
tives of predatory wealth or special inter
ests, hut who desire a rigid enforcement of
the law with equal handed justice, must,
loot: to on for protection against the wave
of radical Sm and class prejudice which
will follow ’.lie Denver convention.”
Democratic financiers and bankers of
Baltimore are coming out for Taft and
Mu-noun. Michael Jenkins, president of
the Safe Dmv>i: Trust Company, and
fermei p; eMdent of the Merchants *\r
Aimers’ Transportation Company, a promi
21 •-*’ 11 Democrat, said that he would not vote
“It is my opinion,” said Mr.
Jenkin>, “that Bryan will lose Maryland
by no,00" majority, lie has never won :n
Maiyland, and I see no reason why lie
should carry it this year. His election
would be a >erious blow to the country. 1
trust that Taft will be conservative in his
letter of acceptance ol tin* Republican nom
ination, e>pecially on the anti-injunction
plank." Alexander Brown, of the banking
house of Brown A: Sons, also advocates the
election of Taft. “Although a firm believer
in the policies >f the Democratic party as
upheld by Cleveland,” said Mr. Brown, “it
is my firm conviction that the interests of
the country would be safer in the hands of
Tuft than* in the hands of Bryan, and I
shall accordingly vote the Republican tick
et." Several Democratic presidents of
banks take the same position. Members of
the Baltimore Stock Exchange, almost to a
man, are for Taft.
IS SUMMER TRYING UPON YOUR
HEALTH?
You Need a Tonic to Keep I p Your Strength
Not a Laxative to Further Weaken the Body
Not all tonics are suitable for use during
the. hot months. Many tonic preparations
are also purgatives and tend to aggravate a
condition prevalent in summer.
If you are weak and run-down, pale and
without energy and ambition, take a sug
ge.-tioi. fi iini the hot countries of South and
Central America where the tonic remedy
almost exclusively used is Dr. Williams’
pink Piils. The reason for the popularity
of these piiis in regions where it is always
>ummer m that they have no laxative action,
thev build up tlm blood without purging and
weakening. They give strength and do not
take it away. An excellent example of the
Ionic a**thdi of this remedy is the case of
_M,v, bmt R. Searles or Hanover street,
Mar.Mmh, Mich.
“I was taken sick a few years ago,” she
v. “ n; whole system being run down
ai d debilitated. 1 had no strength nor am
bition, \<"l fearfully in flesh and my com
plexion was weak and digestion poor. I
had a coimtant craving for food, although
tn. stomach pained me all of the time. There
was also a great deal of pain in my back,
li ins and sides and I had hard headaches.
My blood was thin and impoverished and I
was rapidly going into a decline. I could
nut work and life didn’t seem worth living.
“i tried doctors and several medicines for
ever a year with but little benefit. My sis
ter, who was visiting me, urged me to try
Dr. Williams’ Pink Pills. 1 bought some
at once and after taking a few boxes was
restored to health, gained about 30 pounds
in weight and have been the picture of
health ever since.”
Dr. Williams’ Pink Pills are sold by all
druggists, or will be sent, postpaid, on re
ceipt of price, 50 cents per box; six boxes
§2.50, by the Dr. Williams Medicine Com
pany. Schenectady, X. 1.
SAWDUST FOR PRACTICAL USE.
Sawdust is one of the puzzling wastes
in lumbering operations. The waste is
«priniiR too. for the kerf—the part cut
out by the saw in the mill and trans
formed into sawdust always beais a
rather high ratio to the boards obtain
ed. In cutting tbin stuff, one-fourth of
the log. or even more, may be kerf.
Efforts to turn sawdust into pulp for
the paper mill have usually been un
successful on account of mechanical
difficulties in handling. In several Eu
ropean countries, however, a new way
has been found of turning sawdust to
account. The sawdust, chiefly pine and
lir, is ground with millstones, exactly
as’old-time mills made corn meal, or
wheat or rye flour. Expensive ma
chinery is not required, but it is neces
sary to take special precaution against
Sires which might start from sparks be
tween the millstones.
The sawdust flour is sold to the dyna
mite factories to be mixed with nitro
glycerine and forms the body or ab
sorbent for that high explosive. It is
also in demand for the manufacture of
cheap blotting papers. The mills in the
Ilarz mountains in Germany, an im
portant manufacturing center, are kept
busy meeting this demand.
The price of the “flour” in Germany
ranges from $7.50 to $12.50 a ton. It is
shipped in bags, like meal, or in bales
of about 40 cubic feet, made by means
of high pressure.
It Can’t Be Beat.
The best of all teachers is experience.
C. M. Harding of Silver City, North Caro
lina. says: “I'find Electric Bitters does all
that’s claimed for it. For Stomach, Liver,
and Kidney troubles it can t be beat. I
have tried it and find it a most excellent
medicine.” Mr. Harden is right; it s the
best of all medicines also for weakness,
lame back, and all run down conditions.
Best too for chills and malaria, bold under
guarantee at R. H. Moody’s drug store.
50c._
foleyskhweycok
Hakes Kidneys and Bladder Right
OLD-TIME SEAFARERS.
Our Searsport correspondent sends us
the following additional list of some of
the famous coastwise skippers and their
vessels of old Prospect of seventy years
ago: Capt. Dennis Gridin, sch. Commo
dore Perry, (So tons: Capt. Phineas Grif
fin, sch. George and William, 140 tons;
Capt. Isaac Closson, sch. Dove, 24 tons;
Capt. Samuel Mathews, sch. Sinbad, 71
tons; Capt. Joseph Treat, schooner Two
Friends, 51 tons; Capt. Jeremiah War
ren, sch. Boston Packet, 99 tons; Capt.
Elijah Cyphers, sch. Mary Frances, 84
tons; Capt. Phineas Pendleton, Jr., sch.
Abaco, 133 tons; Capt. Sewell Lancas
ter, sch. Monadnock, 155 tons; Captain
Hiram Hall, sch. Almonock, 59 tons;
Capt. William Clifford, sch. New Eng
land, 104 tons; Capt. Thomas Cookson,
sch. Mouticello, 84 tons; C%pt. Humph
rey Mason, schooner Two Sous, 75 tons;
Capt. William Porter, sch. Rosa Bella,
54 tons; Captain Thomas Warren, sch.
Prospect, 92 tons; Capt. John Phinney,
sch. Batavia, S3 tons; Capt. Timothy P.
Johnson, sch. Potomac, 84 tons: Capt.
Mark H. Eaton, sell. Welcome Return,
3S tons; Capt. George Swain, sch. Two
Friends, 51 tons; Capt. Isaac Carver,
sch. Genoa, 153 tons; Capt. Robert L.
Eells, schooner Bangor, 113 tons; Capt.
Alexander Gridin, sch. Charlotte, 112
tons; Capt. Leonard Grant, sch. East
ern Star, 102 tons: Capt. John Gordon,
sch. Two Sons, 75 tons; Capt. George
Ilyer, schooner Cassius, 120 tons: Capt.
Benjamin C. Putnam, sch. Plow Boy,
103 tons; Capt. Leonard Felker, sch.
North Branch, 127 tons; Capt. Josiah
Towle, sch. Bangor, 113 tons; Captain
Isaac Pierce, sch. Boston, Os tons; Capt.
tiuoiaii •'•i i liter, e'en. >:cic 11 uiottio, aim
tons; Capt. Benjamin Colcord, sell. Ma
jestic, 92 tons; Capt, Nathaniel A. Kid
der, sell. Cashier, 99 tons; Capt. Jere
miah Merithew, sell. Banger, 112 tons;
Ce.pt. Darius Slmte, sch. Watchman,
105 tons; Capt. Ezra L. Blanchard, sch.
Seven Sisters, 115 tons; Captain Phillip
Gilkey, sch. Uranus, 3<> tons; Captain
Henry S. Black, sch. Orient, 22 tons;
Capt. Samuel P. Park, sell. Henry, 117
tons; Capt. Bohert Porter, sch. Plow
Boy, 103 tons; Capt. Joseph Treat, sch.
Bambier, 132 tons; Captain Benjamin
II. Eaton, schooner Polly Ewer, 57 tons;
Capt. Samuel Grant, sell. Prudence, 7S
tons; Captain Josiali Colcord, sch. Wil
liam, 107 tons; Capt. Bichard Butman,
sell. Commodore Perry, oo tons; Capt.
Samuel Curtis, sch. Geneva, 100 tons;
Capt. Willard Treat, sell. Edward, 143
tons; Capt. Joseph Treat, soli. Pavilion,
129 tons; Capt. Oliver C. Park, brig Cal
cutta, 103 tons.
A UKVKI.ATION'.
It is a revelation to people, the .severe
cases of lung trouble that have been cured
by Foley’s Honey and Tar. It not only
stops the cough hut heals am! strengthens
the lungs. L. M. Buggies, Reasnor, Iowa, j
writes: “The doctors saiO J had consump
tion, and I got no better until 1 took Foley’s
Honey and Tar. It stopped the hemor
rhages and pain in my lungs and they are
now as sound as a bullet."—K. H. Moody.
A FARM WHOSE CROP IS TIMBER,
Washington, D. C., July 27. In
every State of the Union there are
many tracts of so-called agricultural
land, which, owing to their hilly char
acter, poor soil, or numerous boulders,
are not suitable for farming. The own
ers of such tracts are often at a loss to
know what to do with them. Without
question, the best use to which land of
this kind can be put is to plant it with
trees. One of the fundamental prin
ciples of forest economics is, tiiat soil
which is not good enough to make the j
growing of cereal crops profitable should
he devoted to the production of wood 1
crops. This does not mean that trees |
grow better on poor soil than on fertile !
soil. They will, of course, grow better '
I on fertile soil. But, in proportion to I
the money invested, better returns are j
secured from trees planted on the less
valuable land.
Most of the cone-bearing trees, and
many hardwoods as well, will thrive in
soil of medium fertility. All trees,
MO\»cVcl, uu nut in 11 v c uu ijuui. oiuiuj
ridges, or on hillsides where the soil is
thin, llinek walnut, hardy catalpa, and
white oak, for their best development,
require a deep, fertile soil, well watered
and well drained, and it is not advisable
to plant them where these requirements
are not met.
An Ohio farmer is solving the prob
lem of what to do with the worn-out
farm, lie owns an old homestead of
sixty acres, which he is desirous of
keeping in the family. He does not
live on the place, however, and farming
lias been a losing proposition. He lias,
therefore, decided to plant the entire
tract with trees. He lias already plant
ed 35,000 Norway spruce, set three and
one-half feet apart each way, on an area
of about gleven acres. These trees will
be cut, as they become large enough,
for Christmas trees. Chestnut seedlings
will be planted in the spaces left by the
removal of the spruce, and it is expect
ed that they will begin to come in bear
ing when the last spruce is out. In
addition to the spruce, hardy catalpa,
black locust, elm, boxelder, and syca
more have been planted. It is planned
to put the entire sixty acres in forest
within live or six years. The owner is
wise in planting several kinds of trees
instead of confining himself to one
species. Ills forest will be producing
six or seven kinds of lumber, chestnuts
and Christmas trees, at the same time.
BKV. I. U WILLIAMS TK STIBIKS.
Rev. t. W. Williams, Huntington, IV. Va.,
testifies as follows: “This is to certify that
I used Foley's Kidney Remedy for nervous
exhaustion and kidney trouble, and am free
to say that Foley’s Kidney Remedy w ill do
all that you claim for it.”
WM WM WmWMWmBMmMWMW'MWMWMWMWMWMWMWM WM ms §m§M
j —Coal at Reduced Prices!—1
| BUY YOUR WINTER’S COAL NOW AT REDUCED PRICES OFTflfl
1 BELFAST FUEL Sc HAY CO. I
|| u je have arranged our docks to receive READING CO.’S COAL IN BARGES and to ali I
| VV customers favoring us with COAL ORDERS before August 1,1908, and who are ready I
1 to receive the coal at our convenience we make the following prices: I
| Egg, Stove and Chestnut Coal Delivered and Put In, on Level, $7.25. At Wharf, $Q|
| Pea Coal, “ “ “ “ “ “ 5.75. “ “ tfl
I From the above prices we allow a DISCOUNT OF 25 CENTS per ton on all anthracite oai
I bills paid within THIRTY DAYS from date of delivery of the coal.
m ALL ORDERS received after August 1,1908, are subject to the August advance of 25 cents pei
H as charged us by the coal companies.
1 OUR COALS, shipped by the READING CO., are finely prepared, well screened and we GUARA:! rE
I SATISFACTION in weight quality and delivery.
| Manufactured wood of all Kinds, HAY,
| Cord Wood, Slabs and Edgings. STRAW.
1 Charcoal. Pocahontas Steam Coal. Maryland Co.’s Coal for Smit
n
I Special Attention Given to Delivery Outside City Limits.
|| Telephone 220. Office 24 Fl0nt Street Yard Foot of sPrin2 Strei"
lL am BM BM BM l
He Knew They’d Fit.
The Southern colonel had a colored
valet hv the name of George. George
received nearly all of the colonel’s cast
off clothing. He had his eyes on a cer
tain pair of light trousers which were
not wearing out fast enough to suit him.
so he thought he would hasten matters
somewhat by rubbing grease on one
knee. When the colonel saw the spot,
he called George and asked if lie had
noticed it. George said, “Yes, sah, Colo
nel, I noticed dat spot and tried mighty
hard to get it out, but I couldn’t.’’
“Have you tried gasoline?” the colo
nel asked.
“Yes, sah, Colonel, but it didn t do
! no good.”
I “Have you tried brown paper and a
t hot iron?”
“Yes, sah, Colonel, I’se done tried
’mos’ everytliiiig I know of, but dat spot
wouldn’t come out.”
“Well, George, have you tried am
monia?” the colonel asked as a last re
sort.
“No, sah, Colonel, I ain’t tried em
on yet, but I knows (ley’ll fit.”.—Every
body’s Magazine.
A Wonderful Mother.
Bringing up nine children on an in
come of $4 a week is the task of a
couple named Copp, whose home is in
the Devonshire village of Higher IIux
ham, six miles from Exeter, England.
The couple have had nineteen children
in all, six of whom are dead. Of the
thirteen surviving, the eldest son, aged
19, is a sailor in the Royal Navy, and
three daughters are out at service.
Five of the children attend school at
Poltimore, two miles away.
The couple were married twenty-four
years ago, and the husband, who is now
44, is employed as a roadman by the
Rural District Council.
Asked how she contrived to bring up
such a large family on the 16 shillings
a week which her husband earned, Mrs.
Copp remarked that it would be a very
difficult thing even for her to explain.
All she could say was that it had been
a very hard struggle. They had to pay
$35 a’year for their cottage and garden.
They helped matters out a bit by grow
ing their own vegetables and keeping
pigs, and she “economized as much as
possible by making and mending the
the children’s garments.”
WILLIAMS’ KIDNEY PILLS.
Have you neglected your Kidneys? Have
you overworked your nervous system and
caused trouble with your kidneys and
bladder? Have you pains in loins, side,
back, groins and bladder? Have yon a
dabby appearance of the face, especially
under the eyes? Too frequent a desire to
pass urine? If so, Williams’ Kidney Pills
will cure you, at R. II. Moody’s, Druggist.
Price 50e.
1 Williams’ M’f’g Co., Props., Cleveland,
READ THIS.
“It is astonishing,” remarked a well
known authority on diseases of the skin,
“how such a large number of people, espec
ially ladies, are by attractively written ad
vertisements, induced to purchase some one
of the many so called Beauty Creams now
on the market, not knowing of course that
they mostly contain oily or greasy sub
stances that clog the pores of the skin and
are for that reason the very worst thing
that they could possibly use. My treatment
of Pimples, Blackheads, Blotches and all
eruptions of the skin, are as follows and
has invariably proved very successful.
Wash the face carefully every night before
retiring with warm water and a little oat
meal tied up in a small cloth bag, then after
di ving well, use the following inexpensive
and perfectly harmless prescription which
can be filled at any drug store. Uearoia $
oz. Ether 1 oz. Aloes 7 ozs. Lse this mix
ture on the face as often as possible during
the day, but use night and morning any way,
allowing it to remain on the face at least ten
minutes, then the powdery film may be wip
ed off. Do not wash the face for some little
time after using. By following this simple
treatment, you will soon have a clear and
Brilliant Complexion.”_
THE CHILDREN LIKE IT
KENNEDY’S LAXATIVE
COUGH SYRUP
DELICATE.
Little Willie isn’t well—
Seems to have a bilious spell.
We’re afraid lie’s delicate.
(Had some apple-tart at eight;
Sine o’clock ’twas cookies; then
Followed ginger cake at ten.
At eleven slipped around
And some cheese and doughnuts found;
Didn’t heed the dinner bell;
Wouldn’t eat; lie isn’t well.
Little Willie Isn’t well— »
(Oue o’clock was bread ana jell;
Two o’clock ’twas pumpkin pie;
Three, some cake upon the sly;
Maple caramels at four;
Hick’ry nuts at five, galore.)
For when supper time came he
Was as languid as could be!
What can ail the boy ? Do tell.
Little Willie isn’t well.
Little Willie isn’t well.
Send for good old Doctor Dell.
Willie doesn’t feel “just right”—
Hasn’t any appetite;
Wouldn’t dinner, supper, eat,
! Though his mamma did entreat,
I Is it chicken-pox, you think?
Should he have some milk to drink;
Give him nux? Or calomel?
Little Willie isn’t well.
—Woman’s Home Companion.
Delay in commencing treatment for a
slight irregularity that could have been
cured quickly by Foley’s Kiduey Remedy
may result in a serious kiduey disease.
Foley’s Kidney Remedy builds up the worn
out tissues and strengthens these organs. ,
Commence taking it today.—R. II. Moody.
[Towntalk
Makes Bread that Combines
HIGHEST FINEST GREATEST
COLOR. FLAVOR. NUTRITION.
ask your grocer,
I
Masury’s Pure Lead Paints
Are guaranteed to contain as large percentage
OF L E A D AS
ANY PAINTS made in this COUNTRY
The BEST there is in PAINT
is embodied in
^MASURY'S^
Order by name and INSIST on having it. tt'25
MASON & HALL, Sole Agents.
S You can make a water-tight box out of |
hardwood flooring, coat the inside with <
KYANIZE FLOOR FINISH
J ■■---■ saa
* Fill it with water and let it stand all day.
Twenty-four hours of water soaking won’t
feaze the KYANIZE a bit. When it’s dry
in an hour or two it will be as bright as j
ever. KYANIZE is waterproof—it’s
, made so on purpose.
- Comes in Clear and Seven Beautiful Colors
| Good for all Inside Work as well as Floor*
I IYAS0N & HALL, Belfast. | G. 0. SAWYER & CO., Searspoft.^j
f
A FINE DISPLAY OF GOODS
-rOlt
WEAR.
Lamson & Hubbard
Spring Styles
BLACK, BROWN, SOFT and
STIFF HATS. All the latest things in
Neckwear, Hosiery,Gloves, Shirts,
In fact, anything you wish for warm ,
weather can be found at
DWIGHT P. PALMER S,
MASONIC TEMPLE.
V ...
Republican Class Convention,
The Republican voters of representative class
No. 109. consisting of the t«»\vns of Burnham,
Freedom, Knox. Montville, Thorndike. i'roy and
Unity, are hereby notified t" meet »>y delegates
at Harmon’s Hall. Thorndike, on Tuesday, Au
gust 4th, A. I>. 1908, at 11 o’clock a. m., t<> nomi
nate a candidate tor representative to the Legis
lature. Also to elect a class committee and
transact any other business that may properly
come before said convention.
The following apportionment oi delegates lias
been made:
Burnham.4 Thorndike. 4
Freedom.3 Troy.4
Knox..3 Unity. .7
j Montville.0
Delegates must he resident# of tin* town they
represent. I he class committee will be present
to receive credentials.
Per order of Republican Class Committee.
MARK T. DODGE, Chairman.
A. M. SMALL, Secretary.
Troy, Maine, July 10, 1908.—3w29
LET CHELSEA, MASS,
Be a Warning.
HOW CAN YOU BE PROTECTED?
By having your house, your furniture and your
business insured in a reliable insurance company.
The cost is very small; so small that you cannot
afford to be without it. “Better to have it and not
need it, than to need it and not have it.”
Insurance Written in Reliable Companies,
Representing Over Fifty Million Dollars, by
FRED ATWOOD, Agent,
3w29 Winterport, Maine.
SHORE COTTAGE
TOR RENT.
Kates cheap. Tea inluutes walk from
postofflee. ASK MR. DICKKY,
Fythiau Block, Belfast.
! Plants, Seeds |.
and FlowerJ;
Cut flowers placed
cemetery Sundays
rates. T
WILLIS E. MAMUKA _
MAINE TAX CO
— 1
The Commissioners np. r
I t-» investigate tin* pre-«-i H
; to make reeommcmlat i-mi
will give a public hcai in . p
Saturday', Aug. I. IPOs
County Court lit H
to consider tbc present ' H
| m this State, and any ■
offered for a more < ■ m.
; tcni t.f taxation, an«l n
] system »d assessment
, Kvery taxpayer in Mv
J any and ail tinn-s, p
I Commission.
1 _ MOKKILI N
House fo
[ A two tenement lion
! goes to shore with 8 ro.i
! be used for cottage l<>i-.
j the street, small oreh t
: also 50 acres in N.n !h" •
I good crop soil, plenty •»;
> ings. This place ns - m.
; where one can get tlici
; tables. Fine views o! !>
• Anyone who wants lam
! 3W24* F. H. IliM
Uei|> W.T- i
Men or women to i
• Magazine, edited hv F
! ley”), Ida -M. Tarb.
; Straight proposition. <.
; terest from year to y.
, F.xpericnee and capita:
| porttinity. Write .I N.
j street, New York City
FARM FO m
IN MON TV I I M - '
-t
! Farm of the late \M.
75 am s, well divided :•
woodshed. (1-x-d lim>. '
water, apple oreli.ird, -
I >. delivery from 1 t li 1.1 a
also a tele -hone in the $
on the place, or of
H
THE 1
PRESIDE
v : 11 | !
(
The Tri-Weekly Tribune
the news of the Preside: 1 M
eluding the elction reti
and The Republican Jour
cacl. for $1.00. Address
REPUBLICAN JO1."-'
_ Be ■ ' **' ■
TO LEI
house at 24 Union strut
ished it desired. Inquirt
24tf MRS. L 4 K'l >
SEARSUOk’1
Heating
HEATING AND
Steam, Furnaces, Stover
Tin Plate, ami Sheel -
STAPLES’ BLOCK, SE»I"

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