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The Republican journal. [volume] (Belfast, Me.) 1829-current, July 01, 1920, Image 7

Image and text provided by Maine State Library

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78000873/1920-07-01/ed-1/seq-7/

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(Continued from Page 6)
Jr «>U
!f: ‘ The stage to Sequoia
it .., and lie was gvacious
bs , me to make the jour
tf Then we recalled hav
I# idren. and presently I
- conversation that he
r , , iner, as he called you,
each other. I was
i' ' I meeting that night—
, you in his big arms
■ light because you’d—
, he was away having
I vnd you hadn’t told
' • that was brave of
when Bryce and Moira
1 me about you—how
how you felt your
ward your employees
.immunity—well, 1 just
leaning toward John
i i>in-partner’s boy, be
" ;:e so fine and true to
> ,a Is.”
. i in. lie is inueeu, oia
i murmured proudly. “I
ever get to know him
if you should-”
intimately,” she eor
■1 saved my life the
ui ran away. And that
, son. I owed him a
; my uncle; but Uncle
. share, and 1 had to
p
1 murmured John Cardi
1 >ut still you haven’t
>. paid a hundred
iir the Giants when
nn ::;ht them for fifty
in I a woman’s reason,
, women always reason
• never the head. How
nut care to tell me, I
Perhaps I have ap
ii quisitive.”
er not tell you,” she
. nt smile fringed his
_yed his leonine head
"Wliy should I ask,
Fell again a restful
1 one guess. Miss
S
would never guess the
v wise old man. When
jr dark, one sees much
; from him in the full
J !. My son is proud,
: -lit, and the soul of
> !a hundred thousand
i ; w it. Probably your
you. You wanted to
, i" money, but—you
a red to offend him by
id you proffered it, he
l o', lined it. So you
- v of the Giants at
s price and kept your
And lie patted her
if to silence any denial,
r ■ * he skid-road a voice—
5 aritone—floated faint
-ugh the forest. Soine
[ . -or rather chanting
e-decs refrain, wild
-
f :r • .stnr'i'y cried
s '••n. coining ro fetch
! ••••'*,” replied John
thing lie’s howling is
v song or paean of
v dig iiis nurse taught
pinafores. If you’ll
Shirh*y Sumner. I’ll
( 1 gei orally contrive
n the trail.”
! good-bye and started
1 his stick tapping
r gging-oable stretched
beside the trail and
i • unendously relieved.
[ to meet Bryce Cardi
she was distinctly
• anligan for his nice
sparing her an inter
••(1 herself in the lum
f air so lately vacated,
i i 1 gave herself up to
j bs extraordinary old
j r:iordinary son.
! bred yards down the
i is father. “Hello,
■ he called. “What do
i <l)y hooting through
| .out a pilot? Eh?
;• klosc conduct.”
I * ' grown duHer,” his
? affectionately, “I
: r come.” He reach
| • t for a handkerchief,
f fmd It and searched
pocket and still
-avy, son,” he remark
i do believe I left iny
■ f—the one Moira
[ ' last birthday—up
' °se That Handkerchief
,or a Farm."
N.r ...
'Min t iose that handker
:nu- Skip along and find
1 11 wait for you here.
L' * 1! t>e i ,
* c* 1,1 * pig's whisper,” his
:ill|l started briskly up
the trail, while his father leaned
against a madrone tree and smiled his
prescient little smile.
Bryce's brisk step on the carpet of
withered brown twigs aroused Shirley
from her reverie. When she looked up
he was standing in the center of the
little amphitheater gazing at her.
“You—you !V she stammered, and
rose as if to flee from him.
(Conclded next week.'
Waldo County Veterans’ Asso'
ciation.
The Waldo County Veterans’ Associa
tion, as usual, held its June meeting at
Morrill June 17th, entertained by Hones
ty Grange. It was a beautiful day and
there was a very large gathering, veter
ans being present from Belfast, North
Searsport, Monroe, Brooks, Waldo, Uni
ty, Montville, Belmont, several from
Newburg and Rev. M. S. Euslin of Mas
sachusetts.
Mo morning session was Held, just a
happy time of sociability followed by a
busy season in the dining hall, the usual
smoke talk and the afternoon meeting at
the church, which was filled to the doors.
The meeting was called to order by Pres
dent Johnson Trask of Newburg. He
stated that this meeting was deferred
from the 3rd to the 17th of June because
of the sickness and death of an honorary
member of the association, Dr. T. M.
Pearson. He made some timely and kind
ly remarks about him as a man and a
brother. Then came the singing of Amer
ica by the audience followed by prayer
by Rev. M. S. Enslin. At the roll-call 39
veterans responded. The address of wel
come was by Rev. Nathan Hunt, who
most cordially welcomed the veterans to
Morrill. Welcomed them even though it
was a time of greai sadness to the peo
ple of Morrill. He paid a deserved
tribute to the member of the association
who had so recently left us; one always
foremost in every good work. Comrade
Cook of Monroe responded in his usual
happy manner.
A recitation was given Dy Helen wing.
Rev. Mr. Enslin was then called upon
andmide interesting remarks. He was
in the navy on one of the transports, a
steamer with a carrying capacity of 3,
500 troops and a crew of 500 officers and
men. He made ten trips from New York
to Brest; nine days for a trip, never stop
ping longer than twelve hours in France,
as they carried supplies for the round
trip. As an inspector he knew that the
troops had comfortable quarters as great
attention was given to keeping them san
itary. they had good buuks, blankets
and good food; and as some said six meals
some days—three down and three up.
Interesting remarks were made by
Comrade Stinson of North Searsport,
who also spoke touchingly of Dr. Pearson
as did many of the speakers.
A vocal solo was giveu by Esther Hunt
with Mrs. James Mears at the organ.
The death of two comrades was re
ported—Fairfield Cole of Winterport'and
Eben Fletcher of Belfast. Both were
members of the 26th Maine.
Remarks were made by Mrs. George A.
Palmer of Monroe.
Marching Through Georgia was sung
by the audience.
A recitation was given by Maud Jack
son.
Remarks were made by Delbert Paul,
an honorary member. |
A flag drill was presented by several
girls.
Remarks were made by Comrade Put
nam of Belfast, Mrs. Grade E. Bowen
of Morrill and Alfred Stinson, who
spoke very enthusiastically of Morrill
and Morrill’s treatmeut of the veterans.
A rising vote of thanks was given Mor
rill for the splendid reception.
A reading was given by Comrade Web
ber of Monroe.
Remarks were made by Sisters Fergu
son and Waterman of Belfast and Hattie
Paul of Morrill.
A recitation was given by Marguerite
Wing.
Remarks were made by Comrade J. G.
Harding of Morrill and by Rev. William
Vaughan of Belfast, an honorary mem
ber and a former preacher in Morrill. He
! gave the association some fine talk along
[ many lines. He said sometimes he felt
j that he was growing old, but no one miss
| ed any of his old time fire and enthusi
' asm. He paid high tribute to Morrill and
Morrill homes.
An instrumental solo was given by
; Mrs. James Mears.
At the suggestion of Mrs. Isaiah Cross,
Mrs. Ella Littlefield and Mrs. Ida Cross
were made members of the association.
The closing remarks were made by
President Trask.
God be with You till We Meet Again
was sung by the audience and the bene
diction was by Mr. Enslin.
The next meeting will be at Newburg
July 1st. G. E. B.
PALERMO.
i
I -
Oar town and community was sadden
i ed and shocked Monday, June 14, by the
sudden death of one of our highly re
i spected citizens, Fred E. Spratt. He
1 went to the barn to milk, had milked one
I cow and evidently not feeling well had
started for the house and as he stepped
■ out of the barn, fell dead. Mr. Spratt
was 56 years old and had been a life long
resident of this town, and had been
deeply interested in its affairs. He had
been a selectmah several years, had rep
resented his class in the legislature, was
master of Lake grange at the time of his
death, and had for many years been ac
tive in Masonry. He leaves a wife, one
daughter, one brother, Sherwin C., Priu.
of high school in Woonsocket, R. L, and
one sister, Mrs. Alice Tibbetts, of Pitts
field. The funeral was held, June 17, at
his late residence, Missionary W. E.
Overlock officiating.
KEEP IT SWEET
Keep your stomach sweet
today and ward off the indi
gestion of tomorrow—try
KmioidS
the new aid to digestion.
As pleasant and as safe to
take as candy.
MADE BY SCOTT a BOWNE
MAKERS OP SCOTT'S EMULSION
ILii
UNCOLNVILLE
Schools in town have closed for the
summer vacation.
N. S. Donahue and wife of Belfast were
recent guests of Hon. and Mrs. A. H.
Miller.
Dr. T. H. Stevens and wife of Booth
bay Harbor were guests of Mr. and Mrs.
C. A. Stevens June 19th.
Miss Edna RacklilT is at home from
Jamestown, R. I., where she has employ
ment as as a nurse.
Mrs. Lena Rankin has been appointed
union superintendent of schools for the
district comprised of Morrill, Searsmont,
Belmont, Northpori and Lincolnville.
The home of Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Mil
ler was the scene of a pretty gathering
Wednesday afternoon, June 16th, the oc
casion being in honor of the Dirthday of
their four-year-old daughter, Jane. Fif
teen guests were present, including seven
little “kiddies,” to help celebrate the glad
event. The afternoon was devoted to
games, music and other entertainment.
Little Jane was the recipient of many
pretty gifts. The tables were spread
and refreshments of ice cream, cake,
cookies, fudge and candy were served.
The most pleasing feature was a beauti
ful birthday cake illuminated with can
dles adorning the tables. The guests all
pronounced it the most joyous occasion
of the season.
KNOX.
John Emmerson is doing carpenter
work for F. A. Kenney.
Mr. A. M. Shiblcs and Harrison Terry
of Montville were in Boston recently.
Mr and Mrs. Pearl W. Berry attended
the graduation exercises at Casline.
I
Mrs. Georgie Harding entertained the i
members of the vV. c. T. U. Thursday, I
Juue 17.
Mrs. Nancy Crosby of Waterville was
the guest of relatives in town a few days
recently.
Mrs. Iris Holbroke and child have been
staying with Mrs. Abbie Penney for a
short time.
Mrs. B. L. Aborn was the guest of four
of her pupils at the pleasant home of Mr.
and Mrs. P. W. Berry’s Tuesday, June
15.
Mr. and Mrs. George Farrar are re
ceiving congratulations upon the birth of
a baby daughter. Mrs. Laura Chase of
Jackson is caring for Mrs. Farrar.
PROSPECT IERRY
P. G. Harding has gone to Auburn, Me.,
where he has employment.
Mr, Otis Ginn and daughter Celia of
Brewer, visited relatives here reeently.
Fred Felker who has Deen up river for
several weeks surveying lumber has ar
rived home.
Mrs. W. H. Harriman and son William
of Rockland are stopping for a while at
their home here.
Mrs. A. B. Godsoe and two children of
Albany, N. Y., are visiting her mother,
Mrs. W. H. Harriman.
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Ginn and two
children of Rockland have been visiting
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Ginn.
School closed here June 18 and a picnic
was held on the fort. Thirty-five were
present and all enjoyed a very pleasant
day.
Mrs. Guy Harding and little daughter
Ruth and Mrs. Jessie Harding of Sandy
point, visited Mr. and Mrs. Percy Hard
ing June 20.
You Guard Against Burglars, But What
About Hats?
Rats steal millions of dollars’ worth of
grain, chickens, eggs, etc. Destroy prop
erty and are a menace to health. If you
are troubled with rats, try RAT-SNAP.
It will surely kill them—prevent odors.
Cats or dogs won’t touch it. Comes in
cakes. Three size-., 25c, 50c, tl.00. Sold
and guaranteed bv A. A. Howes & Co.,
Hall Hardware Co. and City Drug Store.
AMERICA’S GREATEST CHAUTAUQUA SYSTEM
cTWUSIC!!
Rousing martial airs, mellow melodies of music mas
ters, old songs and new songs, lively modern tunes,
humorous recitations and dramatic readings—pre
sented by real artists at your coming
Community"
Chautauqua
As an added attraction a company of talented players
will present the great popular story “Polly of the Cir
cus.” Here is an opportunity to see this great inter
national success right at home.
Five Days of the Best
Entertainment and Music
The Madrigals—
A trio of attractive young ladies presenting selec
tions from all classes of music. You are familiar
with many of their numbers and will enjoy hear
ing them played again on piano, violin and nov
elty instruments. There will be vocal selections
too. Don’t miss this fine little company.
Maude Willis—
One of the greatest readers on the platform, with
that popular American comedy, “The Fortune
Hunter.” Miss Willis is a genuine artist and
never fails to register 100% of the best entertain
ment with her audience.
The Venetian Serenaders—
Three unique musicians who play and sing lively
melodies. They use all the splendid qualities of
their voices, guitars and the piano-accordion to
entertain you.
Beacon Concert Company—
A quartet of musicians well known to Chautau
qua patrons. The violin, piano and vocal mu
sic will drive dull care away. For clean, sincere
entertainment these artists are unequaled! Miss
ing this attraction is depriving yourself of a
musical “treat.”
The Cremonas—
It is always a big event when this great organi
zation comes to town. Your favorite piece is on
their program, also many new tunes. Before you
know it your feet will be keeping time with the
music. There are eight players, including a bril
liant operatic soprano soloist. Come! Hear the
best string orchestra on the Chautauqua plat
form.
“Polly of the Circus”—
Nearly everyone has heard of this great Ameri
can play, the best ever written. Community
Chautauquas have taken this phenomenal suc
cess and, with special scenery and talented
Broadway players, are bringing it to your very
doors. Don’t miss this big elaborate attraction!
TICKETS—Season Tickets, $2.75—But the First 500 Will
Be Sold at $2.20—Buy Yours NOW and
Save 55 Cents.
AMERICA’S GREATEST CHAUTAUQUA SYSTEM
Belfast Community Chautauqua
JULY 21=25 INCLUSIVE
Socony Service
A wide variety of standards is to buy
mixtures is being sold from the dealers listed
under the name “gas- below. They sell only
oline.” The best way SOCONY Gasoline—
to be sure that the gas- pure, powerful. Look
oline you buy meas- for the Red, White and
urea up to quality Blue Socony Sign.
The Sign of a and the World’s
Reliable Dealer Best Gasoline
DEALERS WHO SELL SOCONY MOTOR GASOLINE
BELFAST
EAST BELFAST
ISLESBORO
LIBERTY
MORRILL
NORTHPORT
SEARSMONT
SEARSPORT
NORTH SEARSPORT
STOCKTON
SWANVILLE
WALDO
BANKS’ GARAGE
CITY GARAGE *
HALL HARDWAREJCOMPANY
HARKING & RACKLIKFE
LORD & CO.
HARRY WALKER
WINDSOR HOTEL STABLE
I. MASON CO.
COSTELLO M. WILLIAMS
WALTER A. YOUNG
GEORGE L. EDMUNDS
CHARLES MESERVIE
J. F. VICKERY
C. O. DICKEY & CO.
C. E. PERKINS
V. A. SIMMONS & CO.
W. R. GILKEV & SON
C. O. SAWYER & CO.
FRED E. STINSON
AMES GROCERY CO.
P. L. HUPPER
NICKERSON & DAMM
L. R. STEVENS
Standard Oil Company of New York
When they ask for more—they
give the finest tribute that can be paid
to the housewife who prides herself
on her baking. The finest tribute to
William Tell
Flour
is the fact that after a woman has used it
once, she wants it again. From that time
on, she judges all flours by WILLIAM
1'ELL and no other flour will satisfy her.
WILLIAM TELL wins its favor because
it is always dean and pure and fine.
Be sure of best results bv using WIL
LIAM TELL.
It costs no more to use the best.
Just tell your grocer—WILLIAM TELL.
SWAN-WHITTEN COMPANY L—,.
THE BANKS GARAGE
Buick and Overland Service Station
Let us do your repair work.
Satisfaction guaranteed.
Full Line Accessories.
Open Day and Night.
WANTED
Live, Poultry.
Shoats for Sale.
(
R. J. MAYO.
39-3 t7f
SURETY
BONDS
Why ask your friends to take the riskT
Let the National Surety Co. bond you.
j CHARLES S. TAYLOR, Local Agent,
1 Hayford Block, Belfast, Maine,
AUTO
trucking of all kinds and passen
ger cars to let by the day or hour.
Call 114 3 20tf
C. A. P:iul Garage.
Dr. A. M. Lothrop
DENTIST
Colonial Theatre Building
TELEPHONE 336-3 27tf
SALVAGE
I will pay you 2 1-2 cents for rags, 75
cents per hundred for books and maga
zines and 30 cents per hundred for paper,
I will call promptly and pay you the high
est market prices.
SAM FREEDMAN,
Tel. 229-4 16 Cross St., Belfast.

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