OCR Interpretation


The Republican journal. [volume] (Belfast, Me.) 1829-current, June 30, 1921, Image 2

Image and text provided by Maine State Library

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78000873/1921-06-30/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 2

The Republican Journal
Belfast. Thursday, June 30, 1921
PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY BY
rhe Republican Journal Pub. Co.
A. 1, BROWN. Editor.
ADVERTISING TERMS. For one square,
one inch length in column, 50 cents for
one week and 35 cents for each subsequent
insertion.
Subscription Terms. In advance,
12.00 a year, $1.00 for six months; 50 cents
or three months._ _
QUOTATION
"Back'of the loaf is the wholesome flour,
And back of the flour is the mill,
And back of the mill are the wheat and
the shower,
The sun and the Father’s will.”
THE GERMANY OF TODAY.
Three caDdid and well equipped ob
servers have recently visited Germany
for the purpose of learning what the
economic and industrial conditions in
that country really are. Two of these
observers, Dr. Alonzo Taylor and Mr. C.
W. Barron, are Americans and the
other. Sir Philip Gibbs, isan Englishman.
Dr. Taylor seems to have centered his
vision mainly upon the industria’ situa
tion there, and says:
"A year ago the general attitude of
the worker toward * his employer and the
government was one of ill-concealed,
and sometimes of open hostility.” . . .
"Today, convinced of the utter failure of
communism as tried out in Russia, the
toilers of Germany .have broken loose
from their subserviency to the socialistic
parties.” . . . “The German toiler :s re
covering his traditional thrift and ambi
tion, and is the most riocile worker there
is now in Europe.” . . . “The German
manufacturer, with his ability to obtain
government subsidies, is now in a posi
tion to undersell any other manufacturer
in any country in the world.” Sir Philip
corroborates the above statements of Dr.
Taylor by sayiug: “In Germany there
is a spirit of economic enthusiasm, with
peace and labor as its conditions.” He
also said: “The trusts and labor unions
were working together to produce tire
leading articles of German manufacture
so amazingly good in quality and so
cheap in price that they would be beyond
competition in the United States or in
Europe.” If this is the determined Ger
man purpose the time may come when
German goods, plentiful and cheap, will
flood this country and force many of our
manufacturing plants to c!*jse their doors.
We shall then be fighting a trade war for
which we are now unprepared and de
fenceless. We should not wait till Ger
man cheap goods drive our profiteers out
of business. We should put them out of
business now. Capital and labor should
not wait till German manufacturers and
German labor compels them to work to
gether. They should begin to work to
geth r now. Trie warning is so plainly
written that he who runs may read it.”
Mr. Barron is editor of the Boston News !
Bureau, a publication which gives stock
and bond reports and financial informa
tion of interest to bankers and investors.
His first visit to Germany was made 40
yea.'s ago and he has made frequent visits
there since then, especially during the J5
years preceding the beginning of the
World War. He was there in 1011 and
again in 1912, always for the purpose of
getting information which would be of
value to large business interests and
especially valuable to the syndicates
whose business is to float large foreign
and domestic bond issues. These people
are trying to decide if Germany can pay
and how soon she can pay. Mr. Barron
knows that the readers of the News Bu
reau expect him to say something about
the situation in Germany and he cannot
afford to make any mistake. It is, there
fore. safe to assume that l»e believes
what he says.
Mr. Barron is not so optimistic about
the immeoiate future of Germany as are '
Dr. Taylor and Sir Philip, blit he says
'‘Germany cannot be wiped out. The
Germans are reduced but not extinguish
ed. Their factories are blazing now, but
they can do more. Nevertheless, Ger
many must be considered as at present
ruined in man power, child power, and
mother power, but not. in lands,' buildings
or machinery.” In Mr. Barron’s opinion,
Germany cannot fully recover her old
time industrial strength in less than 20
years and, even then, cannot challenge
Europe to meet her in battle. Every
where tie went he read the story of the
war in the pinched faces of the people
and in the little legs or the children,
more than two years and a half after the
fightin g w 3S ended. The women and
children of Germany were starved to
Not quite ready to give^^B
up but very near it. The^^^B
cheapest and best planl^^B
when you feel this way H|
13 t'o “give up” for "a HS
day or two, stay in the ^^B
house, keep quiet, eat ^^B
lightly of simple food ^^B
end take a mild laxative A
that will REACH THE A
LIVER. You may have ““
a favorite pill or tablet, HB
but don’t overlook the ^^B
fact that NOW you need 11
a prescription to give ^^B aJ
you RESISTANCE — a A
tonic for the vital or- I 1
gans to assure good di- \J
gcstion, pure blood and p
natural action of the V
bowels and kidneys. We hJ
Tecommend “L. F.” ^^B «
Medicine because it has M
helped so many. 60 *■*
doses for 50 cents.
“L. P.” Medicine Co., ^^B
Portland, Me. BH'
emaciation. The labor of Russian pris
oners of war in the fields saved the lives
ft millions of them. Thfc far-reaching
effect of starvation must be taken into
account when one considers the future of
Germany. The present feeble and war
worn generation, unaided, will make
slow progress. But Germany is crafty.
She knows that raw material and man
power are what she needs, and she knows
that these are in Russia. The anti-Bol
shevistic Russian will probably seek an
asylum and will certainly receive a wel
come in Germany as a reinforcement to
her depleted man power, and Germany is
already planning for an ultimate national
alliance with her northern neighbor. Mr.
Barron seems to have considered care
fully what the Germans might be able to
accomplish in 20 years, but we should
not forget that he said: “Her factories
are blazing now, and she can do more.”
In these words there is the same warning
as that given by Mr. Taylor and Sir Philip
Gibbs.
A PUBLIC LOSS.
General Charles H. Taylor, editor of
the Boston Globe, died at his home in
Boston, June 22nd. He was 75 years old.
He had been editor of The Globe since
1873, when the paper was but a year old
and was struggling for existence. His
introduction to the newspaper world was
at the case on the Boston Traveler, when
the Civil War broke out. He enlisted as
a private and served until 1863, when he
was wounded and returned to Boston.
His title of General came with his ser
vice of three years as brigadier general
on the staff of Governor Russell. His
aim was to make The Globe a cheerful,
attractive] and useful newspaper that
would enter the home as a kindly, help
ful friend. In this he succeeded, as a
host of readers of The Globe can testify, j
Under bis management this paper was al- J
ways clean, fearless and worth reading. I
Postmaster General Hays has decided
to revise completely the aviation mail
service established by Mr. Burleson. The
experiment was a costly one, and was of
little if any value to the postal service.
It w’as attended by a shocking succession
of fatalities and in many reported in
stances valuable mail was burned when
burning planes crashed to earth. Mr.
Hays proposes to cut out all the short
hauls because it has been found that the
steam roads carry the mails at less cost
and more efficiently. We believe Mr.
Iiays should go further and leave the
development of continental aeronauticg
entirely to the military department
There is too much duplication of work
by our governmental departments and
agencies.
About two months ago the Senate
passed a resolution for the repeal of the
declaration of war. This resolution was
sent to the House of Representatives for
passage in concurrence. Instead of doing
ihis Congressman Porter introduced a
resolution declaring that the war was at
an end. After the expulsion of vast vol
umes of hot air this resolution was passed
by a vote of 305 to 61. This matter will
now go to conference between commit
tees, as both houses seek oractically the\
same result. Whether the conferees
reach an agreement is not important.
The w'ar ended more than two and a half
years ago.
Governor Baxter appointed Hon. How
ard Davies as chairman of the Public
Utilities Commission and the Council
refused to confirm the appointment. It.
is said that the Council was unanimous
in its decision. Governor Baxter has
again appointed Mr. Davies and a dead
lock seems to be inevitable. The above
is all we know about this matter but in
connection therewith we are reminded of
Prov. xxiv, 6:
“For by wise counsel thou shalt make
thy w*ar; and in multitude of counsellors
there is safely."
It is reported that our Secretary Hughes
and Ambassador Shidehara of Japan
have begun preliminary discussions which
it is hoped may lead to direct negotia
tions for the settlement of all questions
pending between Japan and this country.
It is understood that this discussion was
lirst proposed by Japan and of course the
United States met the proposition with
pleasure. It is vastly more sensible to
carry on direct negotiations than it
would be to leave the settlement of the
important matters at issue to a moribund
League of Nations watched over by Brit
ish secretariat in Geneva, Switzerland.
The .Germans] have paid the first in
stallment of the required indemnity, 1,
000,000,000 marks, in gold. The gold
weighed more than 625 tons. The pay
ment of this is but a small fraction of
what the Allies have demanded. The
time will soon come when Germany will
TERRIBLE CASE
OLECZEMA
Prominent Veterinaryof Dover
Suffered Tortures for
Twelve Years
•TRUIT-A-TIVES”and"Sootha Salra"
Finally Brought Relief
Dover, X. Hi
“In 1906, I began to be troubled
with Eczema. It started on my face
and gradually spread. The second
Bummer, I was so badly afflicted I
had to lay off work. I would keep
my hands tied up at night to prevent
digging into my flesh while asleep.
I spent hundreds of dollars in seeking
relief. I would go for several months
without trouble and then the Eczema
would break out again and I would
be in for a siege of suffering. My
hands, especially across the knuckles,
would be so puffed and swollen I
could not do any obstetrical work
or operations.
It was about three months ago I
chanced to read an ad. of ‘Fruit
a-tives’ about a person being cured
of Weeping Eczema by using this
remedy and ‘Sootha Salva’. I bought
both and in about a week, noticed an
improvement. I have now used two
boxes of ‘Fruit-a-tives’ and one of
‘Sootha Salva’ and am entirely free
of Eczema. My flesh is clear and
smooth and I am that gratified with
the result that I cannot proclaim too
loudly the merits of these remedies”.
E. X. OLZEXDAM, D. V. M.
Doth remedies are sold at 50c. a
box, 6 for $2.50. At all dealers or
sent postpaid by FRUIT-A-TIVES
Limited, OGDEXSBURG, N. Y.
be drained of the precious metal and the
Allies must take German goods instead
of gold and they intend to sell those
goods in American markets for American
gold.
CASTOR IA
For Infants and Children
In Use For Over 30 Years
Always bears
the
Signature of
LABOR AND CAPITAL.
Mr. Aesop was boro in Greece, about
2,500 years ago. He was a slave in his
youth but afterward was given his free
dom in consideration of his wit. He
wrote many fables, some of them were
philosophical, others were ethical, while
others were satirical. Under the titie of
“The Members and the Belly” he wrote a
fable which shows that even in those
days of long ago there was antagonism
between Labor and Capital. A fret
translation of this fable is now being cir
culated in England and reads as follows: s
| “At a special meeting the Tongue, a:
chairman, thus addressed the members
“Fellow members, how long are we to
allow ourselves to be robbed, and the
profits of our labor to be absorbed by the
greed and selfishness of the Belly, who
leads an idle and luxurious life, while we
are working hard for him? I call upon
you all to strike, to revolt from this atro
cious tyranny; I cal! upon you, Hands,
not to lift a linger to keep the miscreant
from starvation; upon you Legs, not to
bring supplies; upon you Arms, not to lift
to the mouth; to you Teeth, not to chew
a morsel; in fact, I call upon every mem
ber to join in destroying this miscreant.
Belly.”
This speech met with tremendous ap
plause, and all members pledged them
selves to carry out the revolt. A few
days afterwards another meeting was
held, at which the Tongue said: “Fellow
members! let me congratulate you on the
success of our policy; the Ear has told
me that last night he heard the Belly
rumbling and grumbling and moaning in
the most awful manner; I could say
more, but, unfortunately, I am feeling a
little out of sorts, I am dry and parch
ed.” Then the other members began to
complain; the Legs said they were very
shaky; the Arms could not lift anything;
the Teeth had been chattering all night;
and all seemed to thiDk there must be
some infectious epidemic raging. At last
the Head said:“Let us ask Brains what is
the matter; he is a very knowing fellow,
and will be able to prescribe a remedy.”
Brains, when consulted, said: “You silly
fellows; Belly is not the idle beast you
supposed; he has worked for you night
and day dig< sting the food you brought
to him, and distributing it to all of you,
so by your revolt you have cut off your
own supplies of food and consequently
you are suffering lor following the advice
of that mischievous agitator Tongue.
“You ought to have taken warning
from the words St. James wrote to the
l'ribes of Israel some 2000 years ago.”
See James 111-5-6
FRANK N. FOWLER
Frank Nickerson Fowler diet! suddenly
of heart failure in Nevada, Iowa, {June
4th. He was the son ofMajor James N.
and Mary Ellen Fowler and was born in
Searsport, Me., June 11, 1858.
He was of Scotch and English ancestry
on both sides, his ancestors having served
in the Revolutionary War. The early
Fowlers came over with the Pilgrim
fathers and on his mother’s side he was
a descendant of the Carver and Curial
| families of Scotch history.
\ As a lad his schooling was in the public
schools of Camden, Me., graduating from
the academic course. Later he spent
about ten years of his very young man
hood as a seaman, visiting many of the
principal ports of the world.
He was united in marria4e to Lottie A.
Treat at Searsport in 1883, and to them
three children were born, ail of whom are
still alive. The eldest is Albert E. Fowler
of Buffalo, N. Y., the second a daughter,
Mrs. Mona L. McDaniels of this city, and
the youngest, Donald W. Fowler of Buf
falo. The wife died in 1903 and January
25, 1905, be was again married, this time
to Miss Hattie D. Broubard of Colorado.
One daughter, Dorothy Lucile, aged 11
years, blessed this union.
Mr. Fowler left the State of Maine in
1886 and came to Iowa, locating first in
Des Moines, where he remained until
1888, when he came to Ames and became
manager of the B. A. Lockwood Grain
Company’s business. He remained there
until 1908, when he was elected treasurer
of the county and moved to Neva la. He
served as treasurer of the county for
eight years, during which time he was at
the head of tbe County Treasurer’s Asso
ciation of the State and ranked as a lead
er in office management in that ling.
While he had been especially active in
Masonry, he had also found time for other
lodge activities, having been a member
of both the Odd Fellows and Knights of
Pythias as well.
Mr. Fowler was a man earnest and
ardent in all of his life's work yet he
always found time to be genial and cour
teous in his dealings with men, loved his
home and was a most devoted husband
and father and leaves a wide circle of
friends who will sincerely mourn his
very sudden and untimely death.
Besides bis wife and four children, he
leaves one sister, Mrs. Ellen Johnson of
Boston. One brother, James N., came
out from the east with him and settled
j in Ames, where he conducted a haber
l dashery business until his death in 1907.
The mother died in 1883. The aged
father died at Rockport, Me., about three
1 years ago.
Children Cry
FOR FLETCHER'S
OA3TO R 3 A
CbRTAIN OPINIONS OF DOCTORS.
The doctors in convention at Boston
listened to strong arguments favoring
, discontinuance of gaseous fumigation of
i houses to prevent the spread of conta
| gious diseases on the ground that the
j procedure is absolutely worthless and
| contributes to wrong education of the
j public. And with regard to children’s
diseases the opinion expressed was that
j proper education accomplishes more for
| the control of such diseases than is poss:
| ble by means of health regulations and
drastic legislation.
i It appeared that notwithstanding “des
perate campaigns” in Massachusetts the
mortality from diphtheria, measles, scar
let fever and whooping cough has not
decreased. One speaker summed up the
I conclusion as follows:
Concerted action can teach the aver
j age American mother that intelligent is
olation of her child under three years of
i age is going to he a very wise precaution
in view of the possible deaths from meas
| les and whooping cough. The mother
; can do it if she wants to, and if she can
j get rid of the foolish idea that the. quick
er the baby is exposed to w hooping
: cough, and the sooner he gets over it the
: better he is. Then we will get rid of this
! terrible mortality. It is in the hands of
: the American mother She can control
| the child up to the age of three years,
j and after that no one can control the
j American child.”
LAMSON
HUBBARD
STRAWS;
SOLD
Br
Dwight P. Palmer
and Owens Bros.
SOCDNY
' REG. U.S. PAT. OFF.
GASOLINE
and
Backed by fifty
m
years* refining
experience.
The sign of a reliable dealer
and the world’s best Gasoline
%om Galhtv
the Same”
STANDARD OIL CO. OF NEW YORK
26 Broadway
Your kitchen is your pride. You
want it bright and clean and
shining. Our big mill where we make
WILLIAM TELL
FLOUR
is “our kitchen.” We are proud of it and
we keep it spotlessly clean. That is one
of the factors that helps to make William
Tell the good flour that it is.
We know that you would delight in this
big clean mill, and you’d pronounce it a
fitting home for a fine flour like William
Tell.
Dust proof machines scour and grind the
wheat and the flour is then sifted through
finest silk, put into clean, new sacks and
sealed.
No human hand touches William Tell Flour
until you open the sack in your kitchen.
Make sure of getting this fine, clean,
pure flour. Tell your grocer—Wil
liam Tell.
SWAN-WHI1TEN COMPANY
VIELU! HERE Jam! AU N ice and New]
l Was just Purchased 6v—Now
REAU.V l DON'T KNOW—THE BUVER D\Q
NtT WRITS HIS ORHEfl I
ON ME VET-SOME
PEOPlvE ARE :
'foR&ETFOU
"5ot ANVWAV I KNOW
*T‘M 6QNNA HAVE A6000 TIME,
fiOUtf BVT THIS isEXOTINgIHEHC IT
ft ,THE THIRO OAV AND I'M HAVIN6
THE TIME OFMVMFE .THE SHOW
To-oxy was The best vet— uook how
y/oftw andTATTEREO I'M,
6ETTlNfr—l
00NT MIND
HElP/Atc
To MAKE SOMEONE
HAPPy'
6£e &0T THAT WAS A PlNF OVENINP
PROGRAM , I W6A/T INTHF AFTFRAI00N
AND EVENING Too.1 I TELL YOU IT LOOKS
like i’ll have A GREAT Time This
WEEK.—even IF l WAS
PUNCHEO "twice
TO-DAY. DH.HUg;
MV-l/fAVE so. manv holes in me
l FEEL LIKE A SWISS CHEESE —GET
\ CATCH COLO - JAV l yOU SHOULD
HAVE SEEN THE FOURTH DAy-OH
60V 1 IT WAS IMMENSE -l WoULD/ft
_
Just as i expected— a good
entertainment and LECTURE
TO-DAy, Cm BE7NG HANDLED
QUITE A UT LATELy —
6oT PU/l/CHFD AtAZ/V, '
Ta-DAy-iT
ME THIA/-s<
-BUT z ,
SHOULD WORRy '
whew! wellthat's surf a
Good Job oone. believe me t
Got W Money's worth—nettr
MISS60 ASINfrLC PERFORMANCE
-01DV0U 60 AS OFTeM AS I
DlO? THE <WW WHO BO06AT Me
SAID IT WAS THE BEST CHAU
HAD.TWAT PLEASED ME.yol) BET.
COPAMUNVTV CHAUTAUQUA
For wve Werv Time.
GooD-ey Folks J a
Once Used—Always Used
I
| i
STARCH Ay
| fk«fiSS2SP* f,
! flAKES COLLARS AJiD CUFFS STIFF AND MCE
■j'raaMiiaiMuiuiBmY purposes
i ®
I > W
’■ j.c .hubwgerbrosco.;a y
'v NLW hftVtN.CONN: KLOKUK.IOWfty^ ^
Makes Ironing Easy
Used as cold water or cooked stare
with equally good results. 3m22
ELASTIC STARCH
For Rent
LIGHT HOUSEKEEPING apartments
for adults in the Leach house, 72 Church
street. Modern conveniences. Also ga
rage to rent. Inquire of
25tf DR. VICKERY.
W L. 0001
Undertaker
Licensed Embalmer
License 377.
Belfast, Maine. Tel. 61-3
WANTED
A Woman for Kite~cn Help.
Good wages paid. At Temple'Heights
Inn, Northport, Maine.
F. R. BOWDEN, Prop’r.
Upholstering and Furniture
REPAIRING
Done in first class shape, at reasonable
prices. Leave orders at my house, No. 6
Bay View street.
4w25* E. L. CLEMENTS.
: Special Nolice
We wish to inform the public '■
are doing business all the time and if
wish to buy or sell real estate of a
we would be pleased to talk with >
E. A. STROUT Farm Agem
ROY C. FISH, Local Mnmu
Room 2, Odd Fellows’ Block, Belfasi '
tf47s
i Mil I -T r-it-T ill..—
yMINTOM
f isa H^uie ^
^ strain- I .ill1 f
Cht-sl Colds. I*. • rj
* Colds, Croi.ji .1 jg
_ P-roiiu-liiliei.
>UNT‘d, ieli('ve>|
all congestion. m
| WARD’S ALLEYS
Are Again Opened for Busin. ■
FDR BOTH LADIES
AND GENTLEMEN
The accommodations arc of Jttie lltsl
and the loom large and'well ventilatevi
Call and see. 2w25*
Belfast Community Chautauqua, July 12-1?

xml | txt