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The Republican journal. [volume] (Belfast, Me.) 1829-current, August 17, 1922, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78000873/1922-08-17/ed-1/seq-7/

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ALL HIS LIFE i
HE SUFFERED
Until “Fruit-a-tives” Brought
Perfect Health
49 Asofrson St., I’okti \ni>, M unf. i
«• I was troubled witli Constipation J
pvrr since I can rememlter. As a |
result, "-vs subject to distressing I
Headaches and I’ain in my left side.
1 chanced to read about “Fruit-a
tives" in one orour local papers and i
began their use about four months ]
ago. Since then, I have been free of |
Headaches, my bowels have been
regular, and from the use of “Fruit
a-tives'-’ (Fruit Laxo Tablets) I feel 1
have derived the greatest benefit”.
OTIS M. BUY A NT.
50c a box, fi for $2.50, trial size 25c.
At dealers or from FRUIT-A-TIVES
Limited, OGDRNSBURG N. Y,
Meeting ot Waldo Co. Veterans
A very pleasant and enjoyable meeting
of the Waldo County Veterans Associa
tion was held in Monroe, Aug. 3rd. The
day dawned bright and clear and the vet
erans and their friends began |to arrive
early and on their arrival they were met
by the E. M. Billings Post.
The forenoon session was called to or
der in the Grange hall, President Trask
presiding. The records of the meeting
were read and accepted. A committee of
three was appointed by the chair on time
and place of next meeting as follows:
Comrades Davis, Clark and Kendall. The
names of John McKinley of Jackson and
John Nado of Monroe were reported.
Comrade McKinley died some three years
ago, but his name had not been reported.
Comrade Nado passed away last May;
also Comrade Josiah Knowlton of the
19th Maine, Co. B. An adjournment
was then taken for dinner and 40 vet
erans, 28 wives and widows and other
guests to the number of two hundred
and twenty were provided for in the I.
O. O. hall. The usual smoke was en
joyed during the noon hour by the vet
erans.
The afternoon session has held in the
Town hall, which was well filled. Opened
by singing the Star Spangled Banner;
prayer by Thomas Gregory of New York
Reports of committee on time and place
was as follows: Mystic Tie Grange Hall,
Belmont, the first Thursday in Septem
ber. A splendid address of welcome was
given by Lizzie York; response by Com
rade Morse of Liberty; solo, Miss Fay
Chapman; remarks by Comrade Abbott;
music by the fife and drum corps; re
marks by Comrade Cook; solo, Priscilla
Swett; remarks and song by Mr. Glid
den; piano solo, Bradford Webber; rec ,
Lena Smith; remarks by Comrade Put
man; music, Webber and Cilley; remarks
by Mrs. Fletcher, Capt. McDonald and
Rev. ihomaB Gregory; remarks and
story, Alice Palmer. A rising vote of
thanks was given the people of Monroe
for entertainment and dinner.
Thus closed one of the best veterans
meeting Monroe has had for a long time.
Closed by singing “God be with you ’till
we meet again.”
Children Cry
FOR FLETCHER’S
CASTO R 1 A
FREEDOM.
_
I
Mips Annie Bryant has returned to her
home in Unity.
t'ana and Seth Ranton were in Belfast i
August 5th to play in the Belfast Band.
Mrs Mae Knowlton spent a few days
recently with her daughter, Mrs. Hazel
Cunningham, in Troy.
Mr. and Mrs Roy Sparrow were week
end guests of Mr. Sparrow’s parents, Mr.
and Mrs. Willard Sparrow, Aug. 5th.
Mrs. Nettie Yeaton has returned to
l,\nn, Mass., after spending a short time
with her mother, Mrs. Knowles Bangs,
w ho is ill.
Mr. Ralph Clement has gone back to
Boston, where he has employment, after
spending his vacation with his family at
the dormitory.
Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Vose and sons,
Ernest, Thomas and Aubrey, and a
friend, were Sunday guests of Mrs.
Ralph Clement, August 6th.
The Sunday school dinner given Thurs
day, Aug. 3, was well patronized and the
school realized between |16 and J17 Now
the little tots can have their chairs and
table thav have needed so long.
OAK HILL, Swanville.
Mr. and Mrs Daniel Kaller of Frank
fort were re ent guests of Mr. and Mrs.
George Harvey.
Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Hardy and fam
ily were in Prospect July 30th, guesta of
Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Young.
Mrs. Tannie Small of Waterville re
turned home August 5th, after a few
days’s visit with her sister, Mrs. Jennie
Webb.
Mr. and Mrs. Mclntire, who have been
visiting Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Roberts,
went to Belfast Aug. 1st to visit Mr. and
Mrs. Tibado.
Mr. and Mrs. Albeit Nickerson of
Searsport and Mr. and Mrs. Leon Webs
ter called on Mr. and Mrs. James Webs
ter recently.
Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Roberts and son
Herbert and Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Peavey
were recent guests of Mr. L. O. (Hanley
in South Thomaston.
SAM GOMPERS.
The president of the American Federa
tion of Labor is one of the most interest
ing exh bits in the United States. No
one better understands the value of a good
slogan. No one is more clever in playing
to the galleries. No once can adopt a
false position and keep his balance
through as long a term of years as Sam
Gompers can.
When it is proposed that a national
court of conciliation somewhat like the
Kan-as court of industrial relations shall
be established, he is right on the trigger
with his shopworn shockers about com
pelling men to work, about reducing
workers to slavery, about involuntary
servitude. That is all “old stulf,” and he
knows it is all buncombe, to use the older
term, or “bunk,” to use the newer one.
He may have reiterated the phrases so
often as himself to believe them by this
time. But the truth is that he objects to
all forms of industrial tribunals establish
ed by law and to all proposals for the in
corporation of labor unions because the
strategy of his job requires him so to do
and because he wants the labor unions to
keep their autocracy in the industrial
world. The federation which he heads is
1 the one body in this country that under
| takes to sav who shall work and who
shall not. The right to strike he makes
the cardinal article in his creed. The
riglu to prevent other men from working
is not avowed in the creed, but his or
ganization lives by it and would have hard
work to live without it. How long, we
wonder, will Mr. Gompers, clever as he
is, be able to “put over” the same old
tirade about the enslavement of labor.—
Boston Herald.
A boy up at Tripp pond, who wanted
his little sister to go in swimming with
him, put her on an inflated inner tube of
a bicycle tire and let her Host. The wind
took her and the boy went screaming to
the house. They rescued the little girl
out in mid-pond and she seemed to think
nothing unusual had happened.
STRIKE BRIEFS
Nashville Tennesseean—'Strikers can ]
not be driven to mines,” says Lewis. No,
but they can be prevented from driving
others from the mines.
Detroit Free Press—If Mr. Gompers is
so certain that nobody can be found to j
take the places of the union miners, why
is he disturbed because the Presideut has
promised protection to those who will '
worn?
Los Angeles Times—Legally, men have
a right to slop work when they please.
Morally, to cease production is wrong
The right of men to do wrong will never
be established in a world in which men
are interdependent.
Albany Journal—Won’t Mr. Lewis
kindly take a few minutes oil to tell us
how t le coal miners who said they
couldn’t live on the wages they wer
earning, are living so long even without
them?
San Francisco Chronicle—President
Harding’s proclamation calling upon all
good citizens to uphold the laws, to pre
serve the public peace and to facilitate
operations essential to the public welfare,
voices the real sentiment of the American
people.
Albany Journal—Workers should be
ware of forming the habit of thinking
that the right to strike is more valuable
than the right to work,
Rutland Herald—Picketing brings dis
order, disorder brings riot, riot brings
massacre. Let’s have it checked at the
beginning.
FBARFUL COST OF TWO STRIKES
There is food for very serious thought
in the official government estimates of
the losses to the strikers, to the employ
ers and to the business of the country in
the two nationwide strikes now going cn.
More than half a billion dollars—$533,
000,000—is the portentous aggregate of
these losses, divided as follows:
Railway workers and coal miners, at
an average of $7,500,000 a day, have lost
$193,000,000 in wages.
The coal operators have lost -5240,000,
000, estimating SI a ton for bituminous
coal that would have been mined during
ihe sixteen weeks of the strike.
Total—$433,000,000 for these two items.
The railroads are estimated to have lost
the remaining $100,000 through curtailed
transporta ion Jacilities and other ex
penses.
There are 690,000 miners and 550,000
railroad workers on strike, according to
the estimate, an appalling total of 1,240,
000 men idle at a time when every etlort
is being made to reduce involuntary un
employment to a minimum that the coun
try may get back to normal industrial
and economic conditions.
TO BUILU TWO BARGBS AT BATH
A contract for two ocean going coai
barges of 1.800 tons capacity for the Gas
Coal trade by the Kelley Spear company j
from the Westmore lind Coal company
of Philadelphia, was the first to be re
ceived at a wooden shipyard in Bath for I
more than a year.
Actual construction will begin in Octo
ber, keeping about 100 men busy all win
ter. The barges will be 195 feet long.
ANOTHER BELFAST CASE
It Proves That There's a Way Out for
Many Suffering Belfast Folks
Just another report of a case in Belfast.
Another typical case. Kidney ailments
relieved in Belfast with Doan’s Kidney
Pills.
Ray Fogg, mason, 7 Green St., says:
“I was taken withja severe attack of kid
ney trouble and the starting of the com
plaint was due to an accident. For
eleven months I was laid up in bed and
there was no let up to the pain icross my
back. I was up and down a dozen times
a night, trying to get ease from the pain
1 had to pass the kidney secretions every
move I made I doctored, but got no re
lief whatever until I bought Doan’s Kid
ney Pills and began using them. This
remedy went to the seat of the trouble at
once and cured me up sound and well. I
went back to work feeling fine.
Price 60c, at all dealers. Don’t simply
ask for a kidney remedy get Doan’s
Kidney Pills—the same that Mr. Fogg
had. Foster-Milburn Co., Mfrs., Buffalo,
N. Y. |
-- I
A wholly line of cars built on time-tried
Buick principles but with improvements and
refinements which make their introduction
an event of nation-wide interest.
14 Distinctive Models
Astonishing Values and Prices
SIX CYLINDER MODELS
23-6-41—Tour.Sedan, 5 pass- $1935
23-6-44—Roadater, 2 pass. - 1175
23-6-45—Touring, 5 pass. - 1195
23-6-47—Sedan, 5 pass. - - 1985
23-6-48—Coupe, 4 pass. - • 1895
23-649—Touring, 7 pass. - 1435
23-6-50—Sedan, 7 pass. - - 2195
23-6-54—Sport RoacL, 3 pass. $1625
23-6-55—Sport Tour.,4 pass. 1675
FOUR CYLINDER MODELS
23-4-34—Roadster, 2 pass. . 865
23-4-35—Touring, 5 pass. . 885
23-4-36—Coupe, 3 pass. . 1175
23-4-37—Sedan, 5 pass. - - 1395
23-4-38—Tour. Sedan, 5 pass. 1325
All Prices F. O. B. Flint, Michigan
Ask about the G. M. A. C. Purchase Plan which provides for Deferred Payments
See These New Buick Cars Now at Our Showroom
D-2-NP
W. R. GILKEY & SON
WHEN BETTER AUTOMOBILES ARE BUILT. BUICK WILL BUILD THEM
First—in Albany
On State? Street, at Pearl, Albany,
N. Y.,681 motorists, motor truck
drivers and chauffeurs were re
cently asked which gasoline
they preferred. The sworn report
showed Socony to be the over
whelming choice as against all
other branded gasolines com
bined. And this marked popu
larity of Socony has been found
to exist generally throughout
New York and New ELngland.
*m ■ ■■ ——
w~
v The big reason
why Socony leads
SOCONY IS ALWAYS DEPENDABLE BECAUSE IT HAS
THE COPPECT PANGE OF BOILING POINTS
M
Total Range
• Positive Starting Quick Pickup Maximum Power<,«<Mileage
AND IN THE POOPED BALANCED PPOPOPTIOH
NOTE—“Boiling-point” is a c6mmon term in
the gasoline testing laboratory. Most (liquids
boil (vaporize) at one uniform temperature. In
the case of water this temperature, or boiling
point, is 212° F. However, every gasoline has
many boiling points—a whole series or“range
of them in fact. It is this range of boiling points
AND the proportion of each group of them flow,
medium and high) that really determine the quality
of a gasoline—its volatility, power and mileage•
economy.
PEOPLE want dependability, first, in everything that they
purchase—in clothing, automobiles, brake lining, tires.
And gasoline is no exception to this rule. That is why a
decided majority of motorists and chauffeurs, after
long experience, have acquired a decided preference for
Socony Gasoline.
You wouldn’t buy an automobile that had wonderful head
lights and a poor motor. It’s all-round excellence that you
demand. A gasoline could be made that would be phenom
enal in one or two ways, but you wouldn’t use it very long.
All-season and all-year reliability in every way is what you
expect in a gasoline. And you always get it in Socony—
dependable starting, dependable power, dependable mileage
and purity.
Here is the explanation of Socony quality and uniform good
ness: it has the correct range of boiling points in the right proportion
—always. (See diagram and Note.)
The fact that you can get Socony everywhere you go in New
York State and New England is another good reason for using
it regularly.
STANDARD OIL CO. OF NEW YORK
26 Broadway ...
SDCDNY GASOLINE
PEC. U.S.FAT. OFF.
0
Every gallon Dependable everywhere
How, ; Station=to=Station
Toll Service Helps Us
We can give you a reduced rate
of at least 20 per cent on sta
tion-to-station toll service be
cause this service
Saves time,
Saves switchboard expense,
Saves toll line expense,
Means more use of our toll lines.
Ask us to tell you about sta
rtion-to-station toll service if you
are not using it.
NEW ENGLAND TElEP HON I
AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY
E. R SPEAK, Manager
The Boston Sunday
Globe Magazine
Be sure to read it. Make sure of your copy
of next Sunday’s Boston Globe by ordering the
paper in advance from your newsdealer or news
boy.
The children will want the invisible color
pictures in next Sunday’s Boston Globe.
Read the Boston Daily Globe today.
TO LET
One half of house at 33 Church street
All modern conveniences and verandah
Inquire on premise# or telephone 243-12
Boy Wanted
For office and clerical work. Prefer sec
ond year High School boy, work begin
ning September first. Apply in han
writing to L. C., Journal Office. 2tS
A particular coffee drinker in
Vermont writes;
"That good old Mocha and Java
flavor I find only in Far East, is the
pleasure of my life. It is good to
know the day of excellent coffee is
stlil with us.”
HOLLAND'S
Far-East
Coffee and Tea
The only coffee, packed by a roast
er, known to contain Arabian Mo
cha and Genuine lava.
1-2-1-3-5-10-25-50 pds. All
packed in HOLLAND SYSTEM
Tins.
Sold at All Leading.Dealers.
Dr. Hester Brown
OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN
30 High Street. leC 320
AUTOMOBILE
TRIMMING
Auto tops, curtains and cush
ions made and repaired. Slip
covers for all cars. Special
Ford Sedan slip covers.
LORD & CO.
Tel. 343-3_^
Eastern Stiaismp Ltiesjoc.
BANGOR UNE
Steamships Belfast and fjmnUft
Leave Bangor daily at 2 p. a, (Standard
Time), Winterport. 2.46 p. m,. Buckaport, SJS
p. m.. Belfast. 5.00 p. m . Northport 6.20 p. a.
for Camden, Rockland and Boston.
Return—Leave Boston daily at t p. m, (Dag*
light Saving Time). Leave Rockland daily at
5.00 a. m, (Standard Time), Camden 6.46 a.
m.. Northport 6.45 a. m . Belfast 7.16 a. m, fag
Buckaport, Winterport and Bangor.
At Boston cor nection ia made via the Met
ropolitan Line express freight and pasaeagag
steamers for New York and points South e^
MAINE STEAMSHIP LINE
Local freight service between Portland aad
New York has been resumed from Custom
House Wharf, Portlani. Upon completion ad
the new State pier at Portland, now ondog
construction, direct freight service to and from
interior points and New York will be raenmod.
GEO. E. UUNTON, Agent.
Belfast. Mains.
ONE OF OUR CUSTOMERS SAYS
Sanford’s no Rust
WASHING POWDER
I» the beet washing powder his wife ever
put in a boiler.
Does 20 Washings. Costa 20 cento.
Try a package.
D. E. SMITH, Agent
P. O. Box 31 75 Church Street
4w29 Mail orders filled.
SOLD BY FRED D JQHIt.
1922 Auto Lloense and
f
Registration
APPLICATIONS, must be iworn tot
MAURICE W. LORD
Notary Public. Justice of the Peace
Hayford Block, UcUaet, Mates tftfi

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