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Palatka daily news. [volume] (Palatka, Fla.) 1919-1994, October 20, 1919, Image 1

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- TODAY'S
NEWS
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TODAY
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VOL. I. NO. 8.
PALATKA, FLORIDA, MONDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1919.
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13 MAKING ,BIG NOISES
IN TALLAHASSEE TODAY
JACKSONVILLE AND PENSACO
LA CARRIED BIG DELEGATION
OF, ROOTERS JACKSONVILLE
' CONTINGENT WENT ON SPE
CIAL TRAIN COMMMISSION
HAS HAID JOB.
TALLAHASSEE, Oct. 20 (Spe
cial) Tallahassee looks livelier today
than it does on innaugural day, with
hundreds of enthusiastic citizens from
Jacksonville and Pensacola, as well as
nearby towns, here to appear before
the Cenetemtial Purchase commission
to make offers for securing designa
tion as site for the exposition which
it is proposed to hold.
The sessions will be held in the
state capitol, and it is expected that
standing room will be at a premium.
Both cities brought special trains with
speakers, bands and all kinds of noise
making devices with which' to make
a demonstration on the streets. The
hotels are crowded and the city pre
sents a gala appearance.
Jax Rooters on Special Train.
JACKSONVILLE. Oct. 20. Jack
sonville's Centennial . Special left for
Tallahassee last evening with 150 men
who expect to return this evening
with the Florida Purchase Exposition,
The train pulled out of the union sta
tion at 11:30 carrying not only a big
delegation from this city but also de-
egations from Femandina,' TampaJ
St. Augustine, Bunnell, South Jack
sonville and Ft. Myers and a brass
band furnished by local No. . 444 of
The delegation is taking wren tei-
osranns from forty-eijfht cities in
Florida asking the centennial1 commis
sion to award the big show to Jack.
sonville. A concrete proposition
will be put up to the commission to
day which will far overshadow any
thing any other community can offer
as an inducement for the fair. The
Tampa delegation was composed of
W. Rogers Wadkins, Albert Thorn
ton, J. S. Blake, W. G. Brorine, chair
man of the centennial commission,
was also on the train, St. Augustine
was represented by Herbert Felkel,
Eueene Masters, J. C. LaMar and E.
L. Young. Fort Myers was repre
sented by J. S. Harvey and Mayor
J. C. Calkins was repressing rer
nandina. There were two delegates
representing Bunnell, E. W.- Way
bright represented South Jacksonville.
Jacksonville was represented by
Mayor John W. Martin, W. A. Ev
ans and J. A. Futoh of the city com
mission. Frank P. Williams, Dr. R.
u narcwall S. S. Marshall and L.
L. Meggs of the board of county com
missioners. The dty council was rep
resented by Fred M. Valz, Rudolph
r.rvtrnll T. C Imeson and other
members, several of whom are al
readv in Tallahassee, Sheriff Dowling
also in the narty. The chamber
rf commerce was represented by B,
R. Kesssler, secretary, J. J.Logan and
several others, Among others who are
in the party are W. R. Carter, and
Arnold Heidt both of the Metropolis,
J. D. Prince, Alfred Hess, J. C. Mad
ison, George Massey, 0. A. Tute
willer, B. K. Hanouforde, Jack Klutho
C. H. Davis, J. H. Mackey, H. H.
Hager, John Donahue, C. H. Purdey
and G. Z. PhUlips, who is in charge
of the train .
It was reported that the automo
hilas in Tallahassee had all been rent
al. The local delegation will parade
from the depot to the Leon hotel
where the meeting ie to be held. The
band from here headed by J. Warren
Porry and the local Shrine band which
is now in Tallahassee will furnish
the music.
SPECIAL MEETING KNIGHTS OF
PYTHIAS.
A special meeting of St James
Lodge, No. 8, will be held in the Cas
tle Hall, Wednesday night, October
22, at 8:00 o'clock, for the purpose of
conferring the Rank of Page.
This in lieu of the regular meet
ing Thursday night.
JAS. G, SPENCER, C, C.
F. D. WATTLES, K. R. S.
T COURT
IS IN SESSION;
SMALL DOCKET
JUDGE WILLS MAKES NO MEN.
TION OF RECENT DISTURB
ANCE HERE IN HIS CHARGE TO
GRAND JURY NAT RICHARDS
TO BE TRIED FOR MURDER OF
RAY BUTTS.
Circuit Court convened this morn
ing with Judge James T. Wills pre
siding. The attendance on court
was the largest for some time, al'
though the docket is comparatively
light, the principal criminal case be'
ing that of the State vs. Nat Rich
ards, charged with the murder of
Conductor Ray Butts two weeks ago.
It is expected that Judge Wills.
would instruct the grand jury to make
an investigation of recent disturb
ances here, following the killing of
the Coast Line conductor, but he made
no reference to the incident. The
Judge confined his charge strictly to
the statute books, instructing the
grand jurors what their duties are un
der the law.
A large venire of petit jurors has
(.Lean -drawn, as it is anticipated it will
be a difficult matter to secure a jury
to try Nat Richards. . .
It is expected that many talesmen
will be disqualified for cause, the feel
ing against the prisoner being strong.
Sheriff Hagan has taken special pre
cautions to see that there' is no dis
turbance when the prisoner is brought
u; the bar of justice, and anticipates
none.
Docket Is Light
The docket for the term is compar
atively light, unless the grand jury's
investigations result in a large num
ber of indictments. Criminal cases
docketed thus far are as follows:
Nat Richards, murder, Eli George
breaking and entering. Leroy Gan
ly breaking and entering, Lula Mor
rison, grand larceny, L. F. Wilkin
son, statutory offense, Ida Roberts,
statutory offense, McKinley Walker
assault with intent to murder, Fred
Creen, robbery, W. L. Lee, forgery,
Stanley Rokola, asault with intent to
murder, G. W. Cameron, non-suport
wife, Josie Rountree, grand larceny,
Charley Hawkins, breaking and enter
ing, Henry Roddick, breaking and en
tering. Ellfs Buoyer, receiving stolen
money, Arthur Earles breaking and
entering, R. L. Glisson arson, M. A.
King, non-supoprt of wife, Norwood
McLaughlin, statutory offense.
SHEATS CRITICALLY ILL.
State Superintendent of Education in
Bad Shape.
Information brought here today
from Tallahassee indicates that State
Superintendent of Education W. N.
Slveats is critically ill and there is
fear that he will not recover.
It was announced some time ago
that Mr. Sheats was seriously ill, but
as no subsequent announcement was
made it was assumed that he was re
covering. He is said to oe aunenng
a complication of diseases which are
calculated to produce death in one
the age of Mr. Sheats.
CAPT. DONALDSON ARRIVES.
Is Second Aviator to Complete Trans
- Continetal Trip.
-NEW YORK, Oct 20 (United
Press) Captain J. O. Donaldson, pi
loting a single seater airplane, arrived
at Mineola at ten three o'clock this
morningi He was the second aviator
to complete the endurance flight from
Mineola to San Francisco and return.
CIRCUI
CELEBRATING THE MARNE ANNIVERSARY
Ulterior of tilt- cathedral of Meuu durfhg thu cera.ionhis bold on lue
".iinivprsary of the battle of the Marnej llonsignor Giulsty of tlie cuthedrul
of Vwdun Is seen iireaching from the pilplt. .
PROSECUTIONS
FOR EXCESS IN
WASHINGTON, Oct. 20 1( United
Fiess) Attorney General Palmer to
day (threatened prosecutions against
sugar refiners who ask higher prices
than those set by the sugar equaliza
tion board.
The wholesale price, fixed by per
cent at seaboard, Mr. Palmer's an
nouncement revealed, "iis ten cents
ctsh, less two per cent, seaboard ba
gia," ;:.,.:v.;, -- -
Mr. Palmer's warning ' was tele
graphed to beet sugar refiners thro-
out the country. The Department of
Justice is cooperating with the equal
ization board to get beet sugar on the
market at a fair panice in order to re
lieve the present shortage, it was
intimated.
BUSINESS MEN ORGANIZE.
Have Sunday School Class With So
cial Features.
Business men of the St. James
Methodist church Sunday School have
organized a class among themselves
for Sunday School work. The or
ganization was perfected Sunday
morning alt Tilghman Hall. The fol
lowing officers were elected:
President John Q. Tilghman.
Vice-ipresident M. A. Murphy.
. Secretary-Treasury, Henry S. Mc
Kenzie. ... '
Teacher, J. V. Walton.
A social committee, M. A. Murphy,
Warner T. Hamm and H. J. Claw
son was appointed.
At the meeting next Sunday morn
ing, a name will be selected, by-laws
adopted and plans perfected for an
outline of campaign for the coming
term. A cordial invitation is ex-
teded the younger business men of
the city to attend. ,
BLASS SIGNS RECORD CHECK
Draws Paper for $2,648,309,171.63 to
Balance June Obligations.
WASHINGTON, Oct 20 Secretary
Glass today put his name to a check
for $2,648,309.53, said to have been the
largest ever drawn. It was made
ayable to the Treasurer of the United
States, but did not involve a transfer
of that amount of money. It was
mnrte necessarv to account for re-
demutions of- certificates of indebted
ness and other obligations in June.
The largest check ever drawn on
the Treasury for outging money was
$200,000,000, which was loaned to
Great Britain.
LEFT MR. PEARCE OUT.
Unintentionally the name of B. C.
Pearce was left oat of the list cf in
corporators of the H. M. de Montmol
lin Co., in the story printed in Satur
day's Daily News. Mr. Pearce is one
of the vice-presidents of the new con
cern and a very important member'of
the firm. The News regrets that bus
name was omitted.
SUGAR
CHARGE
E
LICE RIOT ON
TO
RNOXyiLLE, Oct 20 (United
esj Mauries Mayes, the negro
sentenced to -death in the electric
chair for 'the murder of a white wo
man here August thirtieth, today is
being .taken to the state penitentiary
at Nashville.
The crime for which. Mayes ; was
convicted precipitated the bloody race
riot for which "several " scores" now
awit trial.' Myers was converted in
his cell yesterday. He still declares
himself innocent
EUROPE'S HOPE IN LEAGUE.
Sir J. H. Simpson Also Urges Long
Term Credits to Revive Industry.
NEW ORLEANS, Oct 20 The
hope of the world is centred on the
United States in helping solve Euro
pean problems of unrest by furnish
ing raw materials on long-time cred
its and by indorsing the League of
Nations. Sir James Hope Simpson,
General Manager of the Zank of Liv
erpool, told the Association of Com
merce here today in a speech at a
luncheon.
"Take Poland, for example," he
said, "where immediate relief is need
ed. Raw materials sent there so that
men can be put to work will help the
problem, but the materials cannot be
paid for in a year, two years or three
years.
"If the United States solve this
problem in Europe, it will be the
greatest work for civilization that the
world can expect
"The great hope of England lies
in the League of Nations. I do not
care to review your politicl differ
ences on this, but we in England will
be disappointed if after the war the
cherished dream of a near perpetua
tion of peace is not made possible
by American joining in the organiza
tion of a League of Nations."
NEW YORK WITHOUT SUGAR.
NEW YORK, Oct 20 In a state
ment issued today, Federal Food
Administrator Arthur Williams, de
clared that owing to the shortage of
murar. it would be necessary to place
the city on a temporary ration of
I this food, with regulations concern
ing its use, similar to tnose in ef
fect during the war. New Yoric win
receive from the Sugar Equalization
Board an allowance of at least
000 tons a month, according to Mr.
Williams, all of which will be divid
ed as fairly as possible between the
manufacturer and the consumer.
ROYAL PALM IN WRECK.
MACON, Ga., Oct. 20 (United
Press) Royal Palm, southbound oh
Southern railway, sides wiped the
north bound Jacksonville limited in
the yards at Macon early today.
Seven persons were injured, none fatally.
AS
U
WA
CHAIR
CATTS CHANGES-
GOING TO
FIGHT LEPERS
LEAVE JACKSONVILLE TOMOR
ROW, ACCOMPANIED BY STATE
OFFICIALS, TO ARGUE WITH
SURGEON GENERAL AGAINST
LOCATION OF LEPROSY COL
ONY IN STATE. '
JACKSONVILLE. Oct. 18 (Spe
cial) Governor Catts, accompanied
by Joe Brmari, president of the State
Board of Health and Dr. Ralph Green,
state health officer, will. leave Jack
sonville tonight or tomorrow morn
ing for, Washington to apear Thurs
day before. Surgeon General Blue i
opposition to the location of the lepe.
colony in Florida.
Gov. Catts and Dr. Greene were
piepared to leave for Washington a
week ago Friday night,-but received
telegraphic advices from v Senator
Duncan U. Fletcher that the United
States public health service had no
intention of forcing the colony on the
state in face of consistent opposition.
However, Dr. Greene now believes
tliat the United States public health
service contemplates a campaign of
propaganda aimed at changing the
sentiment of the people of the state.
Charges -Use of Propaganda.
Ha points to the fact that while
Florida representatives in W. Wash
ington have sent repeated reassur
ances the colony would not be forced
on the state, the United States pub
lic heaWh service has never definite
ly stated that its intention had been
abandoned. Drj. Greene also de
clares there ifl strong indication that
the campaign of publicity to swing
sentiment over to the leprosarium has
already been started, r In proof of
this he points to the attack made-ey
Dr. Joseph Y. Porter, quarantine in
spector for the United States public
health service at Key West, on the
stand taken by the state board of
health in opposing the colony.
In his answer to Dr. Porter, Dr,
Greene asked, "May I enquire, Dr.
Porter, if you will give me your per
sonal assurance that you are as a paid
employe of the United States public
health service have not been directed
by Surgeon General. Blue to dissemi
nate propaganda in favor of this col
ony for Florida 1"
Dr. McCoy, another representative
of the United States public healh ser
vice, linformed Dr. Greene that em
ployes of the service had been in
structed to attempt to overcome prej
udice in Florida.
Joe L. Earman, presiden of the
state board of health, has been in cor
respondence with Senator Duncan U.
Fletcher regarding the proposed lep
rosarium, requesting the latter to ad
vise him when General Blue had ar
rived at a "definite conclusion" and
had authorized a "definite statement."
Mr. Earman has not as yet received
the requested assurance.
How Florida Would Suffer. '
The state board of health has never
at any time in' its fight against the
leprosarium lost sight of the fact that
there is unnecessary and frequently
hyserical alarm regarding its conta
giability, but has not swerved from
its position that the commercial and
industrial incalculably if the colony
is forced on Florida.
Dr. Greene made it clear to Dr.
Porter that he was not satisfied with
the present state board of health ru
lings for the control of lepers in this
state and realized the value of a na
tional leprosarium, but did not think
the interests of any state or commu
nity should be sacrificed to the prop
osition. He further assured Dr. Porter that
the benefits of this states healthful
climate, were generously at the dis
posal of anyone affected by a curable
disease, but pointed out that since
leprosy is incurable those afflicted
with this malady would derive no ben
efits from coming to Florida,
How It Would Hurt
Dr. Greene put forward two new ar
guments against the leper colony in
Florida. He declared that should
it be established on the island off
Cedar Key, it would be necessary for
the state board of health to maintain
at the expense of the peonle of the
state a quarantine at Cedar Key to
Ml
PEACE DEBATE
IS
HEADS OF IMPORTANT COMMIT
, TEES SAY THEY CAN MAKE NO
TROGRESS WHILE TREATY IS
UNDER DISCUSSION AND WILL
WAIT FOR . REGULAR SESSION
OF C NGRESS
WASHINGTON, Oct. 20 (United
Press) Adjournment of congress will
foiiow closely on the final treaty vote,
according to -plans of senate leaders
today. '. '
Hope of enacting the program" of
domestic legislation outlined ' by
President Wilson has been abandoned
until the regular session in Decem
ber. , House leaders and chairmen of im
portant committees continue to urge "
the passage of important -legislation,
but the steering committees are find
ing too much difficulty in making
headway because of the treaty debate.
TO PRAY FOR PRESIDENT.
Episcopalians Retain This Custom In
the Ritual. ' .
DETROIT, Oct. 20. The petition
for divine guidance for the President
of the United States will not be omit
ted from the morning service of the
Protestant Episcopal Church. This
is the result of appeals made in the .
House" of Deputies in the Triennial.
General Convention today by Thomas
Nelson Page, former Ambassador to
Italy, and Major Gen. Charles M. Cle-, t
ment of Harrisburg, Penn.
, The proposed concordant by which
it is hoped to bring about closer uni
ty of denominations for the spiritual
welfare of the world was saved for
nsiderapnin the convention byyan
appeal in the House of Bishops by
Bishop Charles H. Brent of Western
New York, formerly Chaplain Gener
al of the American Expeditionary
Forces.
WATER FOR KEY WEST.
Government Planning to Build Pipe
Line From Homestead.
MIAMI, Oct. 20. The army and
navy are co-operating in a plan to
pipe water through a twenty-inch
main from Homestead, on the main
land, to Key West, a distance of 128
miles, so as to supply at least two
million gallons daily. R ear-Admiral
Decer, commanding the Seventh na
val district, in a report just filed, ur
ges on the navy the necessity for par
ticipation; as there is no fresh water
to be had on the island except that
caught in oiserns or transported from
the mainland.
PLEADS FOR MORE NAVY PAY.
Admiral Badger Says Senior Officers
Need Increase to Meet Expenses.
WASHINGTON. Oct 20$. Rear
Admiral Charles J. Badger, who ap
peared before the House Naval Com
mittee today, insisted that the needs
cf the navy required an increase in
pay for men and officers to meet liv
ing costs. He predicted that unless
Congress granted adequate increase
the navy would lose many enlisted
men and officers.
PYTHIAN SISTERS TO MEET.
Pythian Sisters, Palatka Temple
No. 15, will meet at the K. of P. Hall
tonight at 8 o'clock. There will be
initiation of officers and all members
are urgently requested to be pres
ent safeguard the people of Florida from
any spread fo the dlisease.
He declared in view of the many
health problems with which Florida
has to deal he thought these funds
could and should be applied to more
constructive health activities.
Another argument was that the
deaths among the lepers in the col
ony, none of whom would get well,
would be filed with the Florida death
records, and so would give this state
a higher death rate, which would be
ut fair, and would handicap her in fa
vorable comparison with other states
from a health standpoint
BLOCKING
LEGISLATION
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