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Palatka daily news. [volume] (Palatka, Fla.) 1919-1994, October 21, 1919, Image 1

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TODAY'S '
NEWS .
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TODAY I
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VOL. I. NO-9.
WILSON 1PPES f ftllF
SIGK BEBWlliil
SENDS LEHER
COUNTRY'S SERITUS INDUSTRI
AL NEEDS PROMPTS PRESI
;DENT TO IGNORE ADVICE OF
"PHYSICIANS AND WRITES AD-
MONITION TO LEADERS AT CON
FERENCE TO GET TOGETHER
ON BIG PROBLEMS
of groups in industrial mm m$Mm
him MmmmiMwi
WASHINGTON Oct. 21 ( United
N Press) Th President today drafted
a letter to the Industrial Conference
Secretary Lane chairman of the Con
ference said be probably would read
it at this afternoons meeting. ' The
nature of the letter was not stated
in advance, but it was expected to be
an admonition to conferees t(J get to
gether in the face of the country's se
rious Industrial situation.
' The letter was dictated by President
Wilson from his bed. It was written
on the theory, Lane said, that there
was danger of certain members in the
'v conference withdrawing. . Personally
' Lane said, he didn't believe there was
ny real danger of this and hoped tt
wouldn't be necessary to read the
President's letter.
President Is Improving
WASHINGTON, Oct 21 (United
Press) President Wilson didn't sleep
so well last night, but his condition
was improved this morning, according
to a bulletin issued at eleven thirty
today. The President insisted on
writing letter to Secretary Lane re
garding the threatened disruption of
the Industrial Conference. His phy
sicians advised against it, but were
compelled to yield, both because of
Mr. Wilson's wishes and pressure
brought to bear by high officials of
the Government for him to take ac
tion, v
SEEKS LIFE FROM DEAD.
Varonoff Wants Their Glands Saved
for Giving Youth to Others.
PARIS, Oct. 21 Dr. Serge Voro
noff, who has been conducting experi
ments for postponing old age by
grafting interstitial glands, states in
an article in Le Journal today that
the internal secretions of glands such
as the thyroid and supra-renal con
tinue alive for three hours after the
death of the body.
Therefore he advocates that bodies
of young and 'healthy persons killed
in accidents should be rushed to spe
cial hospitals, where patients are suf
fering from curable maladies. He
says that the glands for grafting
could be grouped and put in cold sto
rage where they could be kept indefin
itely. "Unfortunately," writes Dr. Voron
off, "prejudices and aw now prevents
this. 1 Our secular customs require
that our perishable bodies be consign
ed to the earth, where they are slow
ly and uselessly consumed."
LETTER COMES IN 62 YEARS.
Asked Help for "Boy" Who is Now
76 Years Old.
PARIS, Oct 21 They are clear
ing the letter dumps in France, with
the result that what is believed to
be a record for slow delivery has
come ''fi light
A' tter from Meyssac to Clermont
Ferrand, a distance of less than 100
miles, haa taken sixty-two years in
delrV y- The letter solicited assist
ance lor the son of parents m hum
ble circumstances, a boy who gave
jrreat promise at school. The "boy"
is now 76 years old.
TO HEADS
commission m ( FmiMW m h-
NOT READY FOR "m&w' kSal4sMi
expo decision mmAtM
JACKSONVILLE AND PENSACO-
LA WILL BE VISITED BEFORE
A' DECISION IS REACHED
TALLAHASSEE SCENE -O F
GREATEST DEMONSTRATION
IN ITS HISTORY.
TALLAHASSEE, Oct 21 (Spe
cial) Tallahassee has returned to Its
normal peace, and quiet today after
the greatest activity ever witnessed
before en its streets as a result of
the visiting delegations from Pensaco
la and Jacksonviffle, vicing with each
other In moMng a demonstrationTfot
the securing of the award for site of
the Centennial Purchase Exposition.
There was no hearing before tL:
commission yesterday, an consequent
ly, no decision has yet been reached
as to where the exposition will be
held. The ccmmmlission decided, on
acount of the lack of a full attendance,
to postpone a hearing, but to visit
both of the cities contesting for the
location.
The members of the commission
present were Chairman W. B. Bro
rein, of Tampa; W. A. MacWHliams,
of St Augustine; J. J. Logan, of
Jacksonville and J. B. Jones of Pensa
cola. Mr. Logan was appointed to
succeed C. M. Cooper of Jacksonville,
resigned, and J. M. Burguieres ( of
West PaJm Beach, who was appointed
to succeed George W. Allen of Key
West, resigned, was not present at
the meeting. It was on this account
that the hearing was postponed.
John S. Beard of Pensacola,
brought out the fact that the meet
ing was adjourned in Jacksonville
with the understanding that a full
commission would be resent at the
Tallahassee meeting, and that unless
the commission could be made full by
the election of another members, in
the place of Burguieres, Pensacola
would be unwilling to present her
claims for the centennial.
It was acknowledged by Chairman
Brorein that a telegram had been re
ceived from Mr. Burguieres, stating
his inability to be present and also
offering his resignation in case it was
found to be necessary to complete the
hearing.
Mr. Beard stated that Pensacola had
no objection whatever to Mr. Bur
guieres except his absence, and sug
gested that as middle Florida had no
representative on the commission, the J
matter would easily adjust itself if
the commission accept the offer of
Mr. Burguieres and appointed another
member, and pointed out the fact that
if the new member appointed from
Tallahassee, the hearing could be con
tinued to the satisfaction of all. Mr.
Beard was upheld in his statements
by R. Pope Reese and J. B. Perkins,
also from Pensacola.
Jacksonville Agrees.
Jacksonville, represented by Fred
M. Valz, . T. C Imeson and Mayor
John W. Martin, expressed willing
ness to proceed with the bearing, and
to accept the proposition outlined by
Chairman. Brorein, that if the argu
ments were heard at this meeting, no
decision would be determined by the
commission until each delegation bad
i ALATKA, FLORIDA
REMAINS OF HESSIAN CAMP UNEARTHED IN NEW YORK
Workmen excavating at Broadwayand One;Buudred and Sixty-ninth street. New York, unearthed what' la Said
to be the flooring mid fireplace of a hut Qf a tamp occupied by the Husslutos during the Revolutionary war. The photo
graph shows children searching the excavation for relics; ; " , .,
RESERVATIONS
MREATYfARE
FOREIGN RELATIONS (COMMIT
TEE PREPARING TEXT OF
-, RESOLUTIONS AS THEY WILL
APPEAR IN RESOLUTION OF
RATIFICATION, ACTION OF
PACT TO MOVE SWIFTLY.
WASHINGTON, Oct. 21 (United
Press)HMembers of the Senate for
eign (relations committee today were
drafting reservations to the Peace
Treaty as they will apear in the res
olution of ratification. With the
formal reading of the treaty com
pleted action on the pact is expected
to move stviftly. The Johnson amend
ment to qualize the voting powers in
the League Nations was before the
Senate today, but no action is ex
pected before tomorrow or Thursday,
as a number of speeches of the reser
vations, including one on Shantung.
This reservation would declare the
United States reserve freedom of ac
tion with respect to disputes between
Japan and China over Shantung.
APPEALS TO MINERS.
Wilson Asks For Compromise Be
tween Two Factions.
WASHINGTON, Oct 21 (United
Press) Plea for compromise to
avert a coal strike November first
was made by Secretary of labor Wil
son to the operators and miners who
met here today. Wr.' Wilson urged
the delegates to show a conciliatory
spirit, declaring a coal strike would
badly hamper the nation. Mr. Wil
son said he hoped to bring about a
reopening of negotiations between the
two factions. ' '
full oportunity to lay all facts and
claims before the absent member of.
the commission, Mr. Burguieres. I
The matter was discussed pro and
eon for thirty minutes, when the.com- i
mission took a recess, returning with
uie announcement that they had de-1
cided to hold a meeting in Pensacola
Saturday, October 25, at which time
that city would be given an opoprtu
nity to be heard and to present its
full claims to consideration for the
location of the centennial, and that a
similar meeting for a' similar pur
pose would be held in Jacksonville in
the following Monday, October 27.
Chairman Brareh) made this an
nouncement and assured the tryo dele
gation that a full commission would
be present on both occasions, and the
decision would be withheld until aft
er such meetings.
BEING
DRAFTED
TUESDAY. OCT.OBER'21, 1919
WILSON LEARNS
licoNDifis;
i iupniiGuruntc
IIIIUUUII. III1L
" i ( .if
SENATOR HITCHCOCK. . ALSO
WRITES PRESIDENT A LETTER,
PRESENTING OPTOMISTIC
VIEW OF PROGRESS ON TREA
TYLANSING T PRESIDE AT
CABINET MEET SG.
WASHINGTON, Dct. 21 (United
Press) President Wilson, has been
informed of the treaty situation in
the Senate through a letter from Sen
ator Hitchcock, it was learned at the
Whitehoiise today. President Wil
son, has been told of other matters,
iuch as the threatened miner's strike
and the deadlock in the Industrial
Conference, by secretary Tumulty.
Information is also conveyed to the
President directly by Mrs. Wilson and
Dr. Grayson it was stated. Senator
Hitchcock, in his letter, makes at op
titnlstic report, it was learned. This
greatly cheered Mr, Wilson Secre
tary Lansing will preside at today's
cabinet meeting, which will consider
principally the impending Miners'
strike, which is causing grave con
cern in administration circles, as well
as throughout the country.
RU3SIAN FORGE
ENTER CAPITAL
BY NOON TODAY
STOCKHOLM, Oct 21 (United
Press) General Yudenitich, Com
mander of the Russian anti-Bolshevik
forces investing Petrograd told Nel
son Morris. American minister to
Sweden, he expected to enter the city
some time before noon today. Yu
denitich made his statement in re
questing Morris to ask the United
States to aid the starving population
of the city.
LATE PERSONALS
Miss Anna Chenault, of Hastings,
is the guest of Miss Dorothy Mor
rison Miss Birdie Reed, of Green Cove
Springs, arrived this evening and will
be- the guest of friends for a few
days fiiis week.
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Bailey, of San
Mateo, were visitors here this morn
ing. Fred Cochrane left for a short bus
iness trip last night
GERMAN OPERA
WILL NOT BE
rioting - Follo wed efokk
TO PRESENT IT IN GOTHAM
HYLAN ADVISED STATE OF
WAR EXISTS UNTIL PEACE
TREATY IS RATIFIED.
NEW YORK, Oct. 21 (United
Press) Backed by an opinion by
Corporation Counsel Burr that a state
of war exists until the treaty is rat
ified Mayor Hylan today issued orders
to prevent further performances of
German opera in New York.
This action on the part of Mayor
Hylan followed riotous scenes last
night when an effort was made to pro
duce a German opera in a theater on
Lexington avenue. Several hun
dred service men stormed the place
and there wer many bruised bodies
as a result of a charge of mounted
police to clear away the disturbers.
HYDROPLANES THRILL
PALAIKHESIDENTS
Two giant hydroplanes, traveling
from' the navy yard at Pensacola to
New York were in Palatka this
morning, one arriving last night and
the other late this morning.
The first machine to arrive was in
charge of Ensign B. L, Chase and
Hewitt with Mechanicians W. D. Met
all and D. C. Schrimsker. Before
alighting on the St. Johns river near
the club house it circled the city and
the roar of its engines drew the
populace into the street
After the big machine had alighted
it was tied up at the dock and when
the party went to leave this morning
water hyacinths had drifted around it
so that it was necessary to tow it out.
The second machine, which left
Pensacola a short time after the first,
the H. 16, arrived this morning and
proceeded on its way to New York.
Both machines are provided with pon
toons and can only land on water.
They are provided, also with 800
horse power engines, and attain a
speed of about 80 miles an hour.
Mrs. J. P. Wall, of Putnam Hall
was a shopper in the city today.
E. E. White, returned home this
morning from St. Augustine, where
he has been spending aevereal days.
Mrs. M. A. Murphy, of Orange
Mills, is in Palatka on business to
day. Mr. Williams and Mrs. Finley were
visitors from St Augustine today.
SHOWN
PRICE FIVE CENTS '
$10,000,000 IS
RRi IN STATE
UNITED STATES CANE SUGAR
CORPORATION HAS BEEN OR
GANIZEDWILL HAVE TEN
SUGAR MILLS LOCATED WEST
OF MIAMI IN EVERGLADES
SECTION OF STATE.
NEW YORK, Oct 21 (Special)
In the October number of the Farm
and Live Stock Record apeared an ed
itorial frbm advance sheets of Sugar,
the leading journal of the sugar in
dustry, which set forth particulars of
a projected corporation with $10,000,- '
000 capital, divided into 100,000 shares
to be known as the United States
Cane Sugar Corporation. . Its object
was announced to be to take over the
"A W; Hopkins tract," or the "Chev-
alier tract,'; as it is variously known,
lying' due west of Miami' and con
taining 200,000 acres including enough
cane .land to support at" least ten
BEHIND A SUGAR
large mills which would mean, even- - -
tually, a population of nearly 100,000
persons in that section. ; This tract
it was .proposed to plant wWh cane
to erect, upon if a large 'sugar mill ,
which should . be ready to begin grind
ing in the winter of T521-22; besi'des " -a
railroad and.' other necessary con
structions. Rapid progress has been made dur
ing the past two weeks in the organi
zation of the United States Cane Su
gar Corporation.
At the meeting of the directors of
the corporation the following were
elected for the first year:
President Theodore ,R. V. Keller,
managing editor of sugar, New York.
Vise president J. F. Jaudon, presi
dent of Chevelier Corporation and
president of Tamiami railroad, Miami,
Fla.
Second vice president and general
manager, (not yet appointed) nego
tiations with two well known sugar
men now pending.
Secretary, George F.
Coolvsecre-
tary and treasurer of Chevelier, Cor
poration of Miami, Fla.
Treasurer, William F Bullard, head
cf the New York Good Government
"lureau
Assistant treasurer, Herman Mann,
business man of New York city
Directors: The officers and in ad
dition, Judge D. A. McDougalj'bf Ok
lahoma City, Okla., S. R. Ginsburg,
and several representatives from
benking houses.
Chief engineer, Samuel Rowland
Gingsburg, formerly general super
intendent of Central Romana, San
Domingo.
Plans Extension.
The work of the company, as at
present outlined, will comprise the
building of a railroad from Miami to
and through the Chevelier tract to
the West Coast; the construction of
a deep water harbor on the West
Ccast, for future use; the erection of
a lumher mill and removal of more
than 500 million feet of timber; the
erection of a sugar mill capable of
grinding more than 2,000 tons of cane
per twenty-four hours at the start,
and capable of increasing this ca
pacity for subsequent grinding sea
sons; the immediate grading of 500
acres of cane land and the planting
of seed cane; the construction of the
town of Chevelier in the Western
section of the tract; the completion
of the Tamiami Trail through the
property, to form a junction with the
section already constructed south
wards from Fort Myers, the installa
tion of a complete drainage system
for the entire area of land lying be
tween Miami and the West Coast
south of a line drawn through Cape
Romano on the West Coast and Ful
ford on the East Coast '
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