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Palatka daily news. [volume] (Palatka, Fla.) 1919-1994, November 18, 1919, Image 1

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latha
THE WEATHER
TODAY'S
NEWS
TODAY
Cloudy to-night
and Tuesday. Prob-
ably local rain
east and south .
I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 11
VOL. I. NO r33
PALATKA, FLORIDA, TUESDAY1, NOVEMBER 18, 1919.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
9
UNIVERSITY 0
fa
lit
TRANSFER
USE Mm
HOUSE Flltf
Dill!!!
MAJOR JACKSON HAS INSPECT
ED PROPOSITION AND WILL
MAKE FAVORABLE REPORT
TO TRUSTEES DOES NOT FA
VOR CAMP JOHNSON.
The University of the South, lo
cated at Sewannee, Tenn., will, in all
probability, transfer its student body
to Palatka January 5, 1920 for the
spring term. The plan is to use the
Putnam House for dormitory and class
rooms, the baseball park and court
house square for dress parade and
drill grounds.
Major J. C. Jackson, of the United
States army, commandant assigned to
Sewannee, spent yesterday and a por
tion of today here inspecting the Put
nam House and the available drill
grounds and left here with definite
propositions from the Putnam Nation-
Bank, owners of the Putnam House
i-T.-.ld assurances from the proper offi
cials that Palatka would give a warm
welcome to the soldier students.
University Was Burned.
1 Since the main buildings at Sewan
nee were burned several weeks ago
the trustees and board of directors
have been looking about for a favor
able site. They had in contempla
te n Camp Johnson, at Jacksonville,
but it was found that this would be
rather an expensive proposition, as
the buildings there are only tempo
rary structures and in a bad state of
repair. It is also said that there is
some difficulty in securing permission
tc use the site as the government is
making plans to dispose of all of it
property there.
Major Jackson said that the offer
rnade here is decidedly the most flat
tering he has had, and is so impress
ed that he said it is more than prob
able that it will be accepted.
The location of the university here,
even temporarily, will mean that be
tween 250 and oUO students will be
here, under strict military rule. They
. will be subject to rigorous discipline
and will not be allowed out at nights
after taps. Major Jackson scouted
at the idea that there would be any
possibility of disorder from the stu
dents, as they are not permitted even
as much liberty as were the soldiers
in military camps.
At tonight's meeting of council a
resolution will be offered extending
a cordial invitation to the officials of
the University to come here and there
is belief that the invitation will be
accepted.
MRS. WHITMAN LOSES.
Orlando Turns Down Woman Who
Ran For Commissioner.
ORLANDO, Nov. 18 Final count
of votes cast in Saturday's election
shows that F. W. Topliff and Preston
Ayers were elected city commission
ers, defeating H; C. Robertson and
Mrs. Whitman.
The women of the city worked
faithfully IOr AITS. WIUUlUUi, um mo-
:y of her own sex voiea against u.
CONDUCTOR KILLS PASSENGER.
(By United Press.)
ATLANTA, Nov. 18 Conductor
W. D. Simpson, employe of a local
bolley line shot and kUled an un
known negro last night after being
threatened with a gun for refusing to
honor a transfer. The Conductor
was arersted but was released on
thousand dollar bond pending investigation.
HOW PRICES COMPARE.
Farm products cost 478 per
cent more today than they did
twenty-five years ago.
Comapring average prices to-
day with those of 1894 we find
the following differences:
1894
Wheat 60
Corn - 20
Oats .14
Butter 10
Eggs .06
Potatoes - .40
1919
2.08
1.35
1.35
.60
.70
2.00
.23
.15
17.50
15.00
Hens .05
Roosters .02
Steers 2.50
Hogs 3.25
-if
STILL OUT WITH GOAL
SUPPLY RUNNING LOW
(By United Press.)
WASHINGTON, Nov. 18 More
than four hundred thousand miners
are still on strike it was estimated
here today on a basis of a govern
ment report. The number of miners
returning to work is neglible. The
bottom of the nation's coal bin is be
ginning to show bare, j Only approx
imately one third of the, normal
weekly tonnage is being mined, ac
cording to government reports. In
dustrial managers are flooding the
railroads with demands for coal.
Scores of factories have shut down
f cr lack of fuel.
BIG FIRE IN VERO.
Three of Most Important Buildings
In Town Destroyed.
VERO, Nov. 18 Three of Vero's
most important business biuldings and
one boarding house were wiped out
by fire at an early hour Sunday morn
ing, with practicall'all their con
tent. The fire was discovered in the rear
jf Louis Theadore's restaurant. Oc
cupants of the second floor of the
juslding, including a number of room
ers only had time to escape with a
few of their clothes and persona lbe
ungings. All of the equipment of C. D.
1 oole's barber shop and pool room oc
cupying the remainder of the first
.'.nor was destroyed.
From there the fir espread to the
Luilding on the cast owned by T. A.
Los ton, of Peoria, 111., and occupied
ly Mrs. Emma Trice as a boarding
House.
Maher's department store, adjoin
ing the Twichell building on the wes;,
me largest store in the city was the
nex. to go with all its contents, in
cluding the personal belongings of Mr.
Maher and family and several room
eis, who occupied the second floor.
The last building in the row was own
ed by A. L. Brocksmith of Vero, the
first floor being occupied by Allison
Hvothers Grocery and the second as
living quarters by the families of W.
B, and D. P. Allison.
COUNTESS TOLSTOI DEAD.
End Comes to Widow of Famous Nov
elist at Ya'snoyaPoIiana.
LONDON, Nov. 18 Countess Leo
Tolstoi, widow of the famous Rus
sian novelist, died at Yasnaya Polinan,
Nor. i, according to a despatch to
tlie Daily Mail from Helsingfors quot
ing the Krasnaya Gazette.
Countess Tolstoi, before her mar
riage was Sophie Behrs, daughter of
a fashionable Moscow physician.
She was marriade to Count Tolstoi in
1RC2. The couple had sixteen chil
dren. Count Tolstoi's vagaries in his
later life, which led him to flee from
his- family in search of a simple mode
of living, were said to have been a
great strain upon his wife.
EUROPE DISMAYED
AT SENATE ACTION
J CHANGING PACT
ITALIAN PRESS BELIEVES RES
ERVATIONS WILL FORCE RE
VERSION TO OLD SYSTEM Or
MAKING MILITARY ALLIANCES
FOR SAFETY.
(By United Press.)
WASHINGTON, Nov. 18 The Ital
ian and French press appeared alarm
ed at the action of the United States
toward reservations to the peace tre
aty, according to cable advices from
Rome and Paris received in official
circles here to-day. The Italian
press believes the reservations will
mrce European nations to revert to
tiie old system of alliances, while the
French press holds that the reserva
tions will dislocate the Society of Na
tions. The Rome cable says that, accord
ing to a Paris despatch to the Italie,
liie reservations are considered as a
check to the entire policy of Presi
dent Wilson and will force Europe to
resume the old scheme of alliances,
both sides maintaining cordial rela
tions witn the United States.
The Tempo publishes a despatch
from its Paris corresponden saying
the reservation programme of the
American Senate has caused the gra
vest situation yet experienced by the
Peace Conference, and that the re
vision of concessions adopted at Par
is and London may be necessary in
me event of American defection over
me ped treaty. A Pans tele
gram to the Corriere d'ltalia declares
ue Senate reservations are a blow
io the Wilsoman principles included
in the Versailles treaty.
lhe Irienus of France in the United
States are called upon by the Echo
jc Paris to realize that on the decis
ion of the American Senate depends
the fate of the Old World."
lhe 1-aris Temps is quoted as say
ing: "There is much talk about reser
vations on which the American Sen
ate has begun to vote. Judging by
curtain comments, it would appear
tiiat these reservations overthrow the
entire treaty. Such an interpreta
i.uii may be explained by electoral in
terest, but is justified by neither facts
nor texts. We may hope that the
American Senate, where Republicans
deminate, will neither kill the treaty
r.or dislocate the Society of Nations,
rtiul we would do well in Paris when
commenting on Washington debates
never to forget these principles of
international-solidarity which will live
in the soul of America, whatever is
the party in power. They are neces
sary for the security of our country'
Will Kill League, -
The Pans Jlatm says: "Reserva
tions which Saturday's vote renders
definitely means that the United
States can withdraw from the League
t-f Nations whenever they please and
be the sole judge whether obligations
forseseen by the covenant are fulfilled
by them. The society of Nations ap
pear no longer to exist. It can live
only if the most powerful nations ac
cept the rules in common. The trea
ty creates obligations for all coun
tries not to leave the society without
two years' notice, which is no longer
valid for the American Senate. If
the United States make the applica
tion of the treaty dependent upon ac
ceptance of reservations which des
troy its meanings, is there any treaty
left?"
BULGARIA TO SIGN.
(By United Press.)
PARIS, Nov. 18 Bulgarian Treaty
will be signed on November twenty
seventh it was announced here to
day. The Supreme Council again
notified Premier Venizilo of Greece
that the Greek occupation of Smyrna
must be considered provisional.
STUDENTS HERE
. !
I T i " , ,
DECLARES PACKERS rsr0;;" rTDCATV 1flTF
F PILED UP A
GREAT RESERVE
W. B. COLVER, DEFENDING
TRADE COMMISSIONER'S IN
, QUIRY, CITTS FINANCIAL
GROWTH OF THE "BIG FIVE"
SINCE 1904.
. (By United Press.)
ATLANTIC CITY, Nov. 18 Wil
liam B. Colver, a member of the Fed
eral Trade Commission, to-day de
fended the investigation of that body
into the control of foodstuffs by the
packing industry ,and charged the
packers with making enormous prof
its. Mr. Colver made his statements
in a speech at the closing session of
the convention of the National Coffee
Roasters' Association.
"In 1904,' he said, "these gentlemen
(the packers) told Commissioner of
Corporations Garfield that they were
operating on such a small margin of
profit that it was hardly worth talk
ing about. To-day they say the same
thing ye tthey spend millions to
prove how little they earn.
"Fifteen years ago the combined
net worth of the five Chicago packers,
as shown by their books, -wa$iV
148,000. Their combined net worth
this ' year is $479,055,000. During
those fifteen years $87,930,000 of new
money has been put into the business
and $105,938,000 cash dividends have
been drawn out."
Refers ta Roosevelt.
Referring to the charges made by
the packers against the commission.
Mr. Colver said that when President
iioosevelt in 1S06 urged a meat in
spection bill, he was charged with So
cialism, Anarchy and destruction of
xoreign trade.
"We of the commission," he went
on, "have been charged with destruc
tion of forengn trade, conspiracy and
what amounts to treason. We de
mand proof, and the reply is a batch
of charges of the 1906 variety, plus a
1919 improvement, the charge of Bol
shevism. In the mean time, We snail
see whether these concerns shall be
free to invade at will the uttermost
bounds of business."
With regard to charges that the
commission paddled a list of products
Jealt in by the packers and that fif- j
t-two of the products were duplicates
Mr. Colver said the list was a table
of contents from the packers' own cat
alogue. "I am willing to withdraw the fifty-
two complained of," he added, "and j
will substitute the 434 articles shown j
in the index of the 1919-1920 sport-1
ing goods catalogue of one of the five j
packers. There may be duplications
on that list. There are lots of I
tnings."
HARDEE HELPING BAPTISTS.
Calls on Members of Church to Match
Faith With Dollars.
In speaking of the Baptist cam
paign recently Hon. Carey Hardee,
of Live Oak, said:
"The Baptist denomination in the !
South, numerically, is stronger than
rny other denomination. Not only is i
it strong in numbers, but it also pos- j
sesses untold wealth. We shall see,
as a result of this campaign, how
strong it is in spiritual leadership.
What of our boasted numbers and
swollen wealth if neither of them is
a convertible asset for use in the great
work of the Kingdom ?
"When the Southern Baptist Con
vention inaugurated the Seventy-Five
Million Dollar Campaign, they com
mitted the denomination to increased
life and usefulness. They caught the
inspiration -which comes from the
study of God's word and thereby
challenged the Three Million South
ern Baptists to dedicate themselv vs
A disturbance off the southeast
Florida coast of unknown inten-
sity which may move northward
today, was reported last night by
the weather bureau and storm
warnings were ordered from Mi-
ami. Fla., to Georgetown. S. C.
The following announcement was I
made by the bureau: I
"Advisory northwest storm
warnings 9:30 p. m., Miami to
Jacksonville and northeast warn-
ing Tybee island to Georgetown,
S. C, disturbance off southeast
Florida coast of unkonwn inten-
sity may move northward Tues-
day, causing strong northerly
winds on south coast.
MAN KILLED WHEN A
(By United Press.)
BUFFALO, Nov. 18 Seven persons
were killed early this morning when
a New York Central struck an auto
mobile at a grade crossing in the su
burbs. Six of the victims were
nurses 'at ' a focal 'hospital morning in
for the day's work.
INDIAN'S SEEK PROPERTY.
Claim Title to Entire Block In Heart
of City of Tulsa.
(By United Press.)
MUSKOGEE, ,Okla., Nov. 18 To
recover title to one block of land in
the heart of the city of Tulsa action
l as been brought in the interests of
the Creek Indians in the United States
court here by James C. Davis, trivni
attorney for the Creeks.
The "block in question has an es
timated value of $100,000. Forty
Tulsa residences are on the block for
which the government is asking a
court title and possession of the prop
erty. NO EXTRA SESSION.
Governor Had Enough Trouble With
Last One He Called.
TALLAHASSEE, Nov. 18 When
questioned this morning concerning
a rumor current to the effect that
the governor would call a special ses
sion of the legislature, for the pur
pose of passing appropriations for
the centennial exposition and for oth
er legislation. Governor Catts stat
emphatically that he had no in
tention of calling a special session
for this or any other purpose. "
HILBLRN IS DISQUALIFIED.
Will Not Be Appointe dProhi En
forcement Officer For State.
WASHINGTON, Nov. 18 Rumors
current here for several days that
Commissioner Roper of the internul
revenue bureau might not appoint
Judge O. P. Hilubrn, of Tampa, to
the position of prohibition enforce
men tofficer, were verified here to
day. Physical disabilities which
Judge Hilburn received in the war dis
qualify him from performing such du
ties as would be required of him.
and a small part of their means to
the great work enumerated in the
call.
"As churchmen, we must be a for
ward looking people, or eccept that
state of decay which always comes
from inactivity whether in a physical
or spiritual universe.
"Personally, I shall aiake a liberal
pledge. Where is he who calls him
self a Baptist and will not do like
wise? :
ii i in ni i villi
m m m m W
IS EXPECTED
ADMINISTRATION FORCES EX
PECT TO DEFEAT LODGE RES
OLUTION THEN AGREE ON
COMPROMISE WITH THE MILD
RESERVATIOXISTS L O O K S
LIKE A DECISION.
(By United Press.)
WASHINGTON, Nov. 18 The First
Senate vote on the ratification of the
Peace Treaty will be taken Tuesday
according to the belief of leaders to
day. The vote will come on the
Lodge Resolution of ratification which
it i shoped will be formulated before
the Senate adjoutus to-night. It
will lie over one day and a vote will
be today or the following day accord
ing to present plans.
Indications according to Democratic
leaders, are that the Lodge program
may be accepted after two changes
are made, one jn the preamble re
quiring the assent of three allies, .the
other JofteBing the reservation con
cerning article ten. Meantime num
erous conferences are going on over
the terms of the compromise.
A compromise will not be accepted
.until the Lodge resolution is first de
feated as it stands. Administrate
leader Hitchcock ants the Senate to
yo flatly on record as against the pro
gram. After the vote tiie mild reservation
ists are expected to swing to Hitch
cock and help frame a compromise.
Debate over the Labor reservations
occupied the Senate more than two
hours today. Several Senators prac
tically exhaunsted one hour's debate
allotted to them during the cloture.
An attempt is being made to in
duce Senator Hitchcock to fight out
his compromise today before the final
vcte on the Lodge resolution. Sev
eral mild reservations reported have
warned Hitchcock now is the "prop
er" time to suggest compromise.
Senator LaFollette, famous for long
speeches, today discovered a way beat
the Cloture rule. Senator Gronna of
North Dakota, obtained the floor and
asked questions of LaFollette who be
gan a lengthy reply. The chair rul
ed LaFollett ecould answer an Gron
ras itme.
"I do not intend to put anything
over on the Senate by subterfuge,"
LaFollette explained.
After considerable time a point of
order was raised that his answer was
unreasonably long and that in this
way he could talk for two hours in
stead of one. Senator Southland of
West Virginia, in the chair, ruled re-
quiring LaFollette to speak on his
own tune.
MEMPHIS PLANS AN
AERIAL POLICE FORCE.
Dropping of Monkey Wrench From
Plane Has Town Stirred Up.
(By United Press.)
MEMPHIS, Nov. 18 The Memphis
City Council today is considering an
ordinance that would put the air
above the city under control of the
traffic police riding hi Aeroplane.
This is the result of a monkey wiener
fallirg from an aeropUni here yes
tertty. The wrench partially
v-Tecked an auto and missed a man's
l?aa by an 'neh.
ORDER IN BUDAPEST.
(By United Press.)
PARIS Nov. 18 The Allied high
Commissioner at Budapest has noti
fied the Supreme Council that Admiral
Horthy'a Hungarian troops are main
taining order in Budapest following
the Rumainian evacuation.
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