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Palatka daily news. [volume] (Palatka, Fla.) 1919-1994, December 30, 1919, Image 1

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THE WEATHER
Fair to-night and
Wednesday warm-
er to-night except
in extreme west
central portion.
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y1 'VOL. I. NO.7. ' ' . PALATKA, FLORIDA, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 30, 1919 L PRICE FIVE CENTS.
I GALL MEfeTIMG OF. LEAGUE
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NO CONFIRMATION AT WHITE
HOUSE, BUT IT IS UNDER-
i STOOD THAT PRESIDENT HAS
AUTHORITY TO REASSEMBLE
DELEGATES AT PARIS WHEM
HE DESIRES.
(By United Press.)
WASHINGTON, Dec. 30 That
President Wilson will issue the for
mal call for the first meeting of the
League of' Nations at Paris is au
thoritatively stated in dispatches
ifrom Paris, but is lacking in either
denial or confirmation here. v
. It was s.tated at the State Depart
ment this morning that such proced:
ure was "in the air." It was furth
er pointed out, however, and it is re
garded with some significance, that
President Wilson has the authority to
call the meeting if he so desires,
.whether this country has ratified the
jJeace Treaty or not. During? the
sessions of the conferees in Paris Mr.
."ilson was designated as the one to
issue- the firt formal call for a meet
ing, and that such action was not con
ditional upon the membership of this
country. (-
Efforts to secure either a denial oc
"affirmation of President Wilson's at
the White House failed, but a great
deal of credence is given the Paris
dispatches.
REDS NOT TIED HERE.
Cardinal Gibbons Says If They Don't
' Like Us They Can Go Home.
BALTIMORE, Dec. 30 If members
, of the red organization don't like this
;. country let them go home," said Car
dinal Gibbons today. The cardinal
who is one of the officers of the na
tional organization, formed to stamp
out Bolshevism and reds, and which
expects, to secure a membership of
5,000,000, continued:
"If they do not go we will have to
send them there. They came here
to become future citizens, not to be
distatov?.
"Fol '-rners who came to our
shores, ;, given every oportunity to
earn ait;,gt living. The environ
ments here are much better than they
had at home and the authorities give
them every assistance possible to
make them useful citizens of this
' grand country.
"The laws here are not as hard to
obey as those they had to contend
with in their former countries, but
the foreigners must remember that
the laws of this country must be
obeyed by them the same as our own
people have to obey them. They
cannot tell the authorities here how
to- run this country. They are dic
tators. They only came here as fu
ture citizens.
"I repeat, if they do not like this
country and its laws, then the Vst
thing for them is to go "back to e
country they fled from to seek ha i
here."
I COURT HAS JURISDICTION
Mexico Evidently Intends Trying
Jenkins on Conspiracy Charge
i ! 1.
- (By UnitA Press)
MEXICO CITY, Dec. 30 The Mex
j ican Supreme Court yesterday ruled
S .that the federal district court at Pue-
bV ha jurisdiction in the case of
I William Jenkins,, American consular
. agent at l.berty on bail pending trial
I for. alleged collusion with his bandit
i abductors.
GOVERNOR ELECT EDWARDS TO
OPEN FIGHT BY HAVING BILL
PREPARED FOR ASSESMBLY
ATTACK ON DRY BILL ALSO TO
BE ORDERED.
NEWARK, N. J., Dec. 30 As soon
as Governor-elect Edwards -takes of
fice he will direct Attorney General
McCran to institute an attack in the
United States Supreme Court on the
constituionality of the federal prohi
bition amendment, and, pending de
cision on this action, will cause a
bill to be introduced in the Legisla
ture declaring light wines and beer
nonintoxicating and permitting their
sale in New Jersey. Mr. Edwards
made this statement in discussing his
induction message with Democratic
legislators and leaders ai a confer
ence here.
The mattr of the amount of alco
holic content, in these beverages was
not, touched upon in the discussion,
as it was agreed that the court would
first have to pass upon that point.
The governor-elect emphasized that
when he takes office January 20 he
will swear that he will "protect the
rights of the state." Therefore, one
of the contentions he suggests should
be raised in the suit in the United
States Supreme Cdurt is that he was
elected by the people on an anti
prohibition issue, and that it is his
duty to see that the personal rights
of the people are protected.
A tentative draft of a bill to le
galize beer and wine sales that is to
be introduced in the House was of
fered by Senator-elect Alexander J.
Simpson, of Hudson. He- declared
that one of the greatest constitutional
lawyers in the country would pass
upon the bill before it was presented
in the Legislature.
The governor-elect dealers that his
message would contain a recommen
dation for immediate ratification of
woman suffrage by the Legislature.
The course he will pursue on the Pub
lic Utilities Commission has not final
ly been determined upon, and he said
he would discuss that issue with the
legislators and leaders at another
meeting within a week to be be called
.by him.
THIEVES REAP HARVEST.
NEW YORK, Dec. 30 About $25,
000,000 in cash, stocks, bonds, gems,
jewelry and other loot was stolen in
the 10,000 burglaries, robberies and
hold-ups in the city during the year
1919, according to estimates made to
day by officers of many of the city's
.burglar insurance , firms. Such
crimes, they declared increased about
30 per cent, during the current year,
and the heavy toll required of the
burglar insurance companies to make
good their policies compelled them
recently to increase their premium
rates 20 per cent. That alone sav
ed them from financial shipwreck,
they said.'v.
TAKING 3,600-MILE HIKE.
CHICAGO, Dec. v 30 3,600-mile
hike from Toronto, Canada, to Oak
land, Cal., is being undertaken by
John Thorn ton, 20 years old, who
arrived here today. Thornton has
been promised a job on his brother's
ranch in Oakland, and not having
the price of a ticket, decided to walk.
"I ejyi.y 'hello to my broth
er some -time in Marc- 1920," he
said. .The lad sleeps in ti.5 open af
ter he has reeled off some eighteen
or twenty miles a day. -
GOVERNMENT DETERMINED TO
PUNISH THOSE WHO GAVE
OUT ADVANCE DECISIONS OF
COURT FOR FINANCIAL SPEC
ULATIVE PURPOSES.
(By United Press.)
WASHINGTON, Dec. 30 The gov
ernment today determined to prose
cute the persons believed to be res
ponsible for the leaks in the United
States Supreme Court decisions.
Attorney General Palmer is to sub
mit the cases to the Grand Jury of
the District of Columbia this month.
'The department of justice refuses to
reveal the names of the parties who
will be charged with obtaining secret
information and using it for financial
purposes. .
It is reported that a Washington
attorney, an attache of the depart
ment of justice and a minor attache
of the court are involved. They will
bi charged with contempt of court,
it was indicated by the Department
of Justice as there is no definite law
under which they can be reached.
F. I ALLEN DIES AT
TiS HE
F. R. Allen, a well known resident
of this city and one of the promi
nent potato growers of Hastings,
died suddenly at his farm home at
Hastings yesterday. Heart disease
was the cause of death.
Mr. Allen had been in ill health
previously, but had spent the sum
mer in the North Carolina mountains
and returned several months ago
much improved in health. Of late
he had shown marked improvement,
and even up to yesterday he was ap
parently in fair health.
He retired last night without com
plaining of r.ny symptoms of illness,
but later in the night irregular
breathing was heard, and before as
sistance could be rendered he had
passed away.
His wife and only daug ter, Miss
Mildred Allen, were at their city
home on King street, and were noti
fied of the death early this morning.
Mr. Allen and his father had made
their home in St. Augustine for ma
ny years past. At one time he con
ducted a mercantile business- in St.
Augustine, but several years ago he
sold his business here and establish
ed a large farm at Hastings, which
he has been managing up to the time
of his death.
The 'funeral will "ake place from
thefamily residenee on King street
tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock. Rev.
D. H. Rutter, pastor of Grace ,M. E.
church, will officiate. The deceas
ed waf' a Mason of prominence, and
the MYonic order will be in charge
of the. neral.
GE. !SRAL BARRY DEAD.
Former Commander of Department
of the East Passes Away
Suddenly.
(By United Press.)
WASHINGTON. Dec. 30 Maior
General Thomas Ba former com
mander of the depa H of the East
died early today i - . Walter Reed
Hospital, caused . Sidney trouble
and valular heart discae. The-fcody
will be sent t West i !nt where Gen.
Barry was if merly command, for in
terment.
EXTRADITION TO BE TESTED
IN CASE OF VOGEL, WANTED
BY GERMANY-QUESTION TO
BE DECIDED ACCORDING TO
ALL FORMER PRECDENTS.
THE HAGUE, Dec. 301 am in po
sition to state that although there is
no truth in the rumor that he Duch
Governmen has informed the Allies
of its refusal to deliver the ex-Kaiser,
the Netherlands Government still
maintains exactly the same attitude,
namely, Holland musj decide the ques
tion of extradition only according
to laws' and treaties, and must ad
hre to her traditions that the Neth
erlands has always been an asylum
for political refugees.
As the time for extradition draws
nar the Dutch Government awaits
the demand calmly, hoping, however,
that some other solution or some
loophole may be found at the last
minute and relying on the friendship
of America and also on the fact that
America has not yet ratified the peace
treaty.
The German Government's demand
for thexextradition of Lieutenant Vo
gel, implicated in th murder of Rosa
Luxemberg, has reawakened interest
in the question of extradition, mak
ing it a live issue instead of a fu
ture possibility.
ture possibility. I am, however, in
formed by the foreign office that the
question of Vogel will also be de
cided "absolutely according to law
and treaties, and the decision lies
with the Minister of Justice."
If Vogel's attorney succeeds in
provin gthat his client's crime was of
a political nature, then the Dutch
Government will refuse extradition.
Exactly the same arguments will be
used in the question of the ex-Kaiser,
whose case will be treated in the
same way as that of any ordinary
person.
Vogel, who was reported to have
gone to South America, had left the
interment camp and was staying with
Germans in this country when ar
rested. PI ' ' IC SCHOOL PUPILS SHOULD
v HEAR CHAMP CLARK
Champ Clark is coming!
He is one of the great men of the
day who is making and shaping na
tional history.
This fact offers to the public
schools of Putnam and surrounding
counties a unique opportunity to be
hold the actual living man who
stands out so prominently in "Ameri
can life.
Historv. to school pupils is often
dull and uninteresting. Once they
i - UaavA Camn fllnrk.
Afnerican history becomes a thing of
joy and life. Every person should
hear this great man. School pupils
especially those of the High school
erades. should consider this lecture
with the same degree of earnestness
and fidelity as they do any branch of
study in their school.
The Woman's Club of Palatka is
due the everlasting -gratitude of this
community for bringing this wonder
ful man into our midst.
He speaks Wednesday night, Dec.
31st, at 8 o'clock in the Arcade Thea
ter. SIR WILLIAM OSLER DEAD.
OXFORD, England, Dec. 30 Sir
William Osier, noted physician, who
has been ill for several weeks, died
here this evening.
mnnro
iULO
WILL OPPOSE EASTWARD AD
VANCE OF BOLSHEVIK AR
MIES NO NEED FOR RE-IN-FORCEMENT
OF AMERICAN
TROOPS NOW IN EASTERN SI
BERIA (By United Press.)
WASHINGTON, Dec. 30 A Deci
sion virtually ha been reached by Ja
pan to reinforce her troops in Siber
ia to fight the advance eastward of
-the Bolshevik armies, it was learned
today at the State Department. Ad
ditional troops will not be needed to
reinforce the nine thousand American
troops in eastern Siberia.
Final agreement has been reached
between Scecho-Slovakia, the United
States and Great Britain, it was
learned, for the immediate evacua
tion of forty-five thousand Scecho
Slovakia troops in Siberia. The
evacuation will probably start in
three days.
TO.
LAKE CITY M ASKED
ROAD BETWEEN JACKSONVILLE
L AND STATE LINE ASSUMING
SHAPE
Will Open Up Splendid Territory and
Divert Travel From Terrible
Waycross Road
TALLAHASSEE, Dec. 30 Adver
tisements for bids for the construc
tion of approximately fifty-four miles
of State Road No. 1, between the city
of Jacksonville and Lake City, th
county seat of Columbia county, are
now appearing in the leading engi
neering and constructing publications
and will also appear this week in the
Jacksonville and Lake City papers
as well as the Tallahassee Daily
Democrat.
The invitation for bids comes from
the state road department, and it, is
announced that sealed proposals will
be received at the official headquar
ters of the department, in Tallahas
see, up to 10 o'clock a. m , Wednes
day, January 14, 1920.
Fluu instructions to bidders are
given fn the advertisement.
This means that the state road de
partment is ready for' real road build
ing and hopes that before February
1, the work of paving the road from
Jacksonville'to Lake City will be un
der way.
Several convict camps have been
located along the road and the con
victs will be ready to'tkgin clearing,
grubbing and grading on January 1,
preparatory to the beginning of the
actual construction work. iT-
It is estimated that the total
amount involved in the paving of this
section of road from Jacksonville to
Lake City will approximate $1,500,000
The state road department will
hold its regular quarterly meeting on
January 14, at which the bids will be
opened and contracts awarded for
this great piece of work.
FRENCH PASS LOAN BILL
(By United Press.)
PARIS, Dec. 30 The Chamber of
Deputies last night passed the Na
tional Loan Bill presented by Louis
Klotz, minister of finance, by a vote
io f four hundred and ninety one to
sixty four. It was considered equiv
alent to a vote of confidence in the
government.
-
INDEFINITELY
POSSIBILITY LOOMS STRONG IN
WASHINGTON THAT THEY
WILL NOT BE TURNED BACK
TO PRIVATE OWNERS ON
. MARCH 1, AS ANNOUNCED RE
CENTLY. (By United Press.)
WASHINGTON, Dec. 30 Federal
control of the railroads for an indefin
ite period beyond March 1, the date
originally set by President Wilson for
.returning them to the private own
ers, loomed as a possibility here to-
"day.
Railroad labor leaders, representing '
imore than two million workers favor
government ownership for two years
,or more and are making a strong de
mand. A decision in the matter will
be reached late today or tomorrow.
r ... Workers Want a Conference.
CBy United Press)
WASHINGTON, Dec. 30 Execu
tives of Railroad shopmen and clerks
today asked for a Conference with
rail director Hines to discuss the
.Unions' demands for wage increases.
Mr. Hines was unable to see them.'
The Union leaders indicated they
would seek a Conference later today
or tomorrow.
EL,(S TO HAVE ANNUAL
ALL NEW YEAR'S EVE
BRILLIANT SOCIAL EVENT
PLANNED FOP TOMORROW
NIGHT.
I r,y Visitor Expert ed, Here
e From
i .teigliboring Towns "tY:!l Watch
! O'd Year Out.
ErilKsnt ns past Net Year balls
'-v.- b?.n ; t t' e Elks Club the one
planned for tomorrow eveninp: prem
ises to be the most pretentious so
cial affairs ever-attempted. Plans
have been made on a:i extensive scale
for entertaining mmbers of the lodge
and their friends, and a general in
vitation has been extended to visitors
in Palatka and near-by points.
The evening will be given over to
informal social intercourse and, jolli
fication. The favors will be a spe
cial feature. Noise making devices
of all kinds, caps, confetti and ser
pentines being presented to the
guests.
, Shortly before midnight coffee and
... ldwiches will be served and a watch
party formed to watch the old year
out and the new year in. The Pa
latka Orchestra will furnish the mu
sic for the occasion.
LEGION OPPOSES KREISLER
Concert in Pittsburgh Protested by
ex-Service Men.
PITTSBURG, Dec. 30 The coun
ty executive committee of the Ameri
can Legion has decided to oppose the
appearance her of Fritz Kreisler,
Austrian viol'nist.
Mayor Babcock will be asked to
pi oh ib it the concert. The concert
management, following the legion's
action said Kreisler would appear on
January 15, as scheduled. .
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