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Palatka daily news. [volume] (Palatka, Fla.) 1919-1994, January 11, 1921, Image 1

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' WEATHER s
Partly cloudy Wed
nesday; moderate
temperature. . t
TODAY'S
' NEWS
TODAY
IT IS NEWS TOD A Y. HISTORY TOMORROW
SAYS U. S. PICKING POCKETS OF RUSSIA
Ml
VOL n N0 78 ' PALATKA. FLORIDA, TUESDAY, JANUARY11, 1921. PRICE FIVE CENTS
rFAMIMllffillMlBLEm
BLACK WINTER IN CENTRAL
EUROPE DECIMATES PEOPLE
Of THQUSAHQSEVERY DAY
Appearance of People Horrible to Behold After
Hunger Bloat Begins Eat Vegetables to Ex
clusion of Albumens
By Lloyd Allen j To travel through Central Europe
United Press Staff Correspondent . is a nauseating experience especially
London, Jan. 11 Central Europe to an American. The memory of
is in the midst of its blackest winter ffamine districts can never be eradi-
in history. Famine, cold and diseast cated.
are decimating once happy . popula-! It's a series of startling visits to
lions at the rate of hundreds, some- orphanages and refuges where scores
times thousands per day. of babies many of whom will never
Millions are starving slowly. Their i walk because of aggravated rickets
appearance is horrible to behold. They ' that twist little legs into corkscrews
are not drying up into skeletons, like drag themselves about filthy cor-
the famine victims of India ana Ar-
ine Victims OI inula anu ai-
These Polish, Russian and j
i BitfTorora fcnvA "Rtnrvntinn
mema.
Austrian sufferers have
starvation
droDsv." ' It is brought about by al
most complete absence of albuminous
elements and fats in food and the
eating of unusual quantities of vege
tables grass even after which these
hordes, marked for death, drink enor
mous quantities of water. A terrible
bloat results.
In these '"'terror-stricken lands ba
bies are born to parents who have not
a single rag of garment with which
to clothe them; thy are- wrapped in
pieces of paper and perish from cold.
RED MENACE IN HUNGER LANDS IS
ELIMINATED BY RUSSIAN EXAMPLE
Two years ago statesmen of I
France and England feared general !
RnUhpvilti revolutions in the huneer I
lands. Today this fear is practical
ly vanished.
The object lesson of j
starving Russia under Bed rule holds
forth no hope to the hungry of Po
land and Austria.
Danger may exist in the form of a
Bad invasion engineered by the Red
Rulers at Moscow; but this threat
is generally considered quite remote.
Poland, where the Americans are
feeding 900,000 children daily, has
' seen further unheard of increases in
the cost of living. Prices have gen
erally increased 4,000 per cent,
Wheat flour alone has advanced 20,
000 r.er cent, according to official re
ports. Central Lithuania is a Most
wholly without food.
Vienna however is by long odds
the sorest pressed capital of Central J most nutritious foods such as milk
Europe. Once the proudest most and wheat bread, both commodities
luxurious city of the continent it -is j beyond the reachc of any except tha
today in a state of miserable pau- ultra-rich.
FROM THIS CHARNEL HOUSE COMES
BRIGHT RAYS OF GENIUS UNDIMMEjD
Strangely enough in this charnel
house of Vienna; where the ashes of
Beethoven, Mozart, Schubert, Johan
nes Brahms and Johannes Strauss
are buried, the musical tradition his
not been starved out though It
seems only a question of .a few mors
months before the endurance of the
big musical colony is finished the
works of these great composers are
still played in heatless opera houses.
And Lehar, whose "Merry Widow"
delighted all Amer ta, has produced
another wonderful operetta "The
Blue Mazur" whkh is even more
melod;ou3, lieamy and wistful than
the ".Merry Widow '
Meanwhile the gas supply of War
saw "and Cracow has been shut off
because of the coal shortage.
Always the Bolshevik military
pressure menaces the safety of Po
land from the East. To prevent
swift occupation of the entire coun
try and the disappearance of the
Polish State from the map of En
' rope, Poland is forced to maintain
an army of. 500,000 men. This is a
heavy drain on the state's resources.
But this army of hall a million 13
one of the principal mainstays of
European peace.
Throughout the length and breadth
of Poland, according to official gov
riuors nice stricnen animais
nuura imtr aLiiun.cn annual. (
here are wo astounding features of j
this heartrendiner nicture: First. is
this heartrending picture: First, is
the outward cheerfulness of suffering
nations where thereis still hope that
next month will see an improvement
in their pitiable situation. Secondly,
the reverence with which millions
speak of America, where all dream of
going and which all regard as he on
ly "Land of Promise" left in the world
Because from America come food and
funds for feeding nearly 2,000,000
children in the worst stricken lands
of Poland, Austria and . Czecho-Slo-vakia.
pcrization, dying rapidly. Its .fata,
according to general prediction, is
...
Todav 2.000.000 Viennese are cut
off from their traditional sources of
food. With worthless Austrian kro
nen the Viennese cannot buy from
the plentiful food stocks of Serbia
and the provinces of Jugo-Slavia
from where, for centuries, the Vien
na people secured fats and grain. In
1914 the kronen was worth twenty
cents in American money. Today
one kronen is worth a quarter of a
cent.
Strange diseases have made their
appearance in this once gay capital
of the Hapsburgs. Hundreds suf-
fer from brittle bones, which break
at the slightest jar. Thousands
have irritated ulcerated stomachs
from eating vegetables especially
ccabbage and can digest only the
ernment reports here, typhus
and
famine are raging worse than any
winter in history. Typhus fever
was brought Westward from the far
away Ural Mountains and the dark
provinces of Russia, when the Czar's
millions over-run Poland in 1914 on
their futile attempt to reach Berlin.
Since 1914 suffering from typhus
has been indescribable. While only
about seven per cent of Polish suf
ferers die from typhus, the mortality
among Americans and Europeans
who contract the disease is eighty the mail on the subject. senator
per cent. For this reason the Wes- ; Knox, chairman of the congression
tRrn EuroDean Dowers. France and ! al on arrangement has been flooded.
England especially, Tealize the dan-
eer of a typhus-ridden Poland
to
the remainder of Europe.
FLORIDA CASTS UNANIMOUS
. VOTE FOR COX-ROOSEVELT
Tallahassee, Jan 11 The Florida
presidential electors met in the office
of the governor yesterday at noon,
and after casting their unanimous
vote for James M. Cox and Franklin
D. Roosevelt for president and vice
president elected W. V. Knott, of their
number, as messenger to convey the
Florida vote to Washnigton. G. B.
Wells of Plant City was elected as alternate.
HARDING YIELDS
TO DEMANDS FOR
SI
CALLS OFF ELABORATE PRO
GRAM PLANNED FOR IN- -AUGURATION
OPPONENTS STILL
WATCHING PLANS
Thousands of Letters Poured Into
Capitol Protesting Against Lavish
Expenditures
By L. C. Martin.
United Press Staff Correspondent. ,
Washington, Jan. 11 President
elect Harding requested abandon
ment of all plans for elaborate inau
guration ceremonies on advice of
friends in the senate, it was learned
today.
Republican senators close to Har-
"vf"
ding called him on long distance and
u; tun Prah raanlntinn
told him that the Borah resolution
prohibiting further inauguration ap
propriations and the use of public
building for a proposed ball would
come up in the senate today and
probably would be adopted. In ad
dition the agitation against inaugu
ral expenditures in both house and
senate was mentioned.
Harding agreed with what his ad
visers told him, it was said, and in
addition expressed the belief that
abandonment of the elaboratr-rlan
would be an excellent example of
economy with which to start his ad
ministration. Calls It AO Off.'
The result of the long distance
conferences was a telegram to E. B.
McLean, chairman of the inaugura
tion committee in which Harding
suggested "complete abandonment cf
all plans for an inaugural celebra
tion." He said the "impression of
extravagande expenditures 'and ex
cessive cost would make a very un
happy participant" and added that it
is "timely and wholesome to prac
tice the utter denial of public ex
penditure where there is no real ne
cessity." Mclan announced Hard
ing's wishes would be carried out.
By Harding's action the plans for
the most elaborate inauguration in
vears were suddenly changed to
plans for one of the most simple.
Congressmen who have been right
ing inauguration expenditures today
let it be known they would watch
for efforts to gradually override the
president-elect's wishes and they de
clared also there is still necessity for
legislation to prevent profiteering on
the crowds who will come here des
pite the dropping of plans for elab
orate ceremonies.
Protests By Thousands.
The people of the country, even
to its remotest corners have been
pouring into the mail thousands of
protests against lavisrmess at the ex
pense of taxpayers. Since Senator
Borah brought the matter up a week
ago and conducted a losing fight on
the appropriation of $50,000 to pay
expenses at the capitol, men and wo
men have been writing in daily in
creasing numbers. Senator McNary
of Oregon got a protest signed by
sno citizens in his state. Senator
i Borah's office can't begin to read a.l
Nearly every senator has, and like-
wise many members of the house.
The protests come from everywhere,
?Jea(ly 'indicating that the Whole
country wants a simple and econom
ical inaugural.
LEWIS TO DEFEND TITLE.
By UnlI Pr.l
tNlew'York, Jan. 11 Strangler
Lewis, heavyweight wrestling cham
pion and Earl Caddock, former
champion are to meet here in a title
bout January 24, according to Pro
moter Jack Curey. Terms were
not made known but it is understood
that both grapplers will work on a
percentage basis.
WIPLE CEREMONY
NAVYBALLOONISTS
U IT NOTICE
-PEJIN EAST
GREAT CELEBRATION ATTENDS
RAGGED TRIO AS THEY
. STAGGERED IN
SUFFERING WAS
' - MOST INTENSE
All Landed With Summer Underwear
On Where Thermpmter Was
Down Below Zero
. ; (By Unl!d Preaa.)
Mattiee, Ont., Jan. 11 American
naval balloonists, Lieutenants Kloor,
Hinton, and Farrell arrived here this
afternoon shortly after 2 o'clock. They
were great bundles of rags and furs,
thoroughly exhausted, but still game
and of the same American spirit that
kept them alive during a trial through
which few men have ever passed.
They were given a tremendous wel
come out here on the frontier. This
little village has trebled in population
during the last few days. Newspaper
men, movie camera men, relatives,
government officials, from both the
American and Canadian governments
and the curious who wanted a first
sight of the men as they were liter
ally sowed from the maw of a frozen
hell.
On their arrival the men were pro
vided with clothing, a hot meal and
prepared to make their way to the
east.' .'.
JK A Kloor Wires His Parents
Croatley, La., Jan. 11 (Copyright
by United Press) A message from
the frozen north a message of good
cheer to relieve the worries of father
and mother was received in the sun
ny south today. With its coming joy
emanated from the home of Lewis P.
Kloor, father of Lieutenant Kloor,
one of the three American balloonists
who returned from the wilds of north
ern Canada. Young Kloor, in describ
ing the hardships endured by himself
and companions declared that their
I suffering was almost unbearable. "It
was hell and misery," he said. They
landed on the afternoon of Tuesday,
December 14. The cold was deadly.
"I had on my summer underwear,"
said Kloorf "We could only walk for
about two hours at a time. We would
then build a fire to keep from freez
ing." Then Kloor told hqw they found an
Indian who could not speak English,
but through signs they made him un
derstand they were lost. The Indian
led them to Moose Factory.
CLARENCE JONES
KILLS C. MOOTEN
NEAR HAWTHORN
Gainesville, Jan. 11 Sheriff Ram
sey received word last nigkt that
Clarence Jones a farmer residing
west of Hawthorne, had shot and
killed G. W. Mooten, a fisherman of
that section. The sheriff this morn
ing dispatched Deputy Sheriff Tom
Ridgell to the scene of the trouble
and S phone ntessage from the depu
ty later in the day stated that Jones
was in his custody. A coroner's
jury is being empanelled and an in
quest will be held this afternoon.
From what little information that
could be learned over the phone, it
is said that Mooten went to Jones
home yesterday afternoon about 6
o'clock, carrying his shotgun alor.g
with him. A dispute followed and
Jones shot Mooten four times with a
12-gauge automatic shot gun, load
ed with buck shot, which resulted!
in the instant death of Jones.
STATE DEPARTMENT ASKS
O'CALLAGHAN BE DEPORTED
(By Unltrd Pr,u.
Washington, Jan. 11 The State
Department today asked Secretary
of Labor Wilson to deport Donald
CCallaghan, lord mayor of Cork.
The State Department refused to
waive the passport regulations in
this case.
TO
,, CUMIN 1821
COMMITTEE NAMED TO SELECT
PLANS AND DETERMINE
PRICE
TO' BUILD ON LOT
REID AND FOURTH
Dr. Sibert Strongly Advises Begin
ning Money Can Be Secured at
Low Rate of Interest
At the annual meeting of the board
of Stewards of th St. James Method
ist church last night it was decided
to begin immediately making prepara
tions' for the construction of a new
church edifice to be located at the cor
ner of Reid and Fourth streets, on
property now owned by the church. A
committee was named to secure plans,
fix upon the cost and a campaign will
be designed to finance the enterprise.
Rev. J. 1.. Sibert, the new pastor,
strongly advised going ahead at once,
citing that several churches had been
built during his pastorate in various
cities, and that in one instance the
church only had $29 in the reasury
when work was begun. This was at
Kissimmee, where one of the handsom
est Methodist churches in the state
was erected.
''It all begins with the laying of the
foundation," said 4r. Sibert. "The
membership becomes interested the
minute ground is broken, and will not
be content until the roof is on and
I the church jg dedioflJ(J, The question
of money does not enter into it. I
never saw a church construction pro
gram fail or halt yet for a lack of
funds. The general conference board
is prepared to see that no congrega
tion lacks for funds where there is the
spirit and we have everything neces
sary to begin with here."
The church owns two lots, either
suitable for a church, the one at Reid
and Fourth streets being most popu
lar, and undoubtedly, will be the spot
where the new edifiee will be located.
j The lot where the present church is lo-
cated is most desirable for residence
purposes, and will command a good
price, which would be applied to the
construction price of the new church.
The church also has a considerable
sum of money in the treasury
which to make a start.
with
DANIELS ADVISES
AN AGREEMENT TO
GOVERN BUILDING
(By l'nltr1 IVi-mm.1 j
Washington, Jan. 11 Secretary ;
nf flip Tvv Dnnipls hpfnrp thp. :
no i AflW rmm-ttPP to-
day, advised President-elect Hard-
ing to call a conference of all the
nations for the conclusion of an ;
agreement if the United States is j
not to become a member of the
League of Nations immediately, l.e
said. Until that conference secures
a world ogreement there should be
no cessation in shipbuilding Mr.
Daniels said.
PRESIDENT-ELECT
TO TAKE BOAT AT
AUGUSTINE JAN. 21
St. Augustine, Jan. 11 President-
elect Harding, with Mrs. Harding,
will arrive at the Ponce de Leon, St.
Augustine, on January 21, when they
will meet Senator Joseph S. Frelin-
ghuysen and Mrs. Frelinghuysen, of
New Jersev. and join them on ther
house boat Victoria for a cruise dowa
the East Coast of Florida. Upon his
return President-elecct Harding will
remain here the greater part of Feb
ruary in conferencce with some of
his party.
WEST POINT GETS STAR.
Washington, Pa., Jan. 11 Edgar
Garbisch, captain and star of last
year's Washington and Jefferson
footbair team, has been appointed to
the United States military academy
and will enter next July. He will
be candidate for the football team.
IS
CALLS ON ALL FACTIONS
TO
UNITE TO HURL LENINE
FROM POWER
WILL WIPE OUT
ALL AGREEMENTS
Provided He Can Stop America From
"Picking Pockts of a Prostrate
Nation"
By Edwin Hullinger
United Press Staff Correspondent
Copyright 1921 by the United Press
Paris, Jan. 11 Russia must be
saved from being looted by vora
cious American capitalists, Alex
ander Kerensky declared today
in an exclusive interview.
With this objective, the former
premier called for all the anti
balshevik factions to rally to him
to hurl Lenin and Trotsky out of
power.
The United Press correspond
ent was recived in a hotel room
which, littered with charts and
- mapsY resembled an army head-A
uarters. There Kerensky was in
conference with anti-bolshevik
military experts and statesmen.
"Foreign capitalists who acquire
long term grants in Russia from the
soviet government are picking the
pockets of a prostrate nation," Ker
ensky exclaimed, turning a moment
from the task of planning the anti-
bolshevik campaign.
"I am organizing here in Paris a
civilized government for Russia an
exile administration, you might call
j it j nave calIed in all the anti-bol-
shevik leaders.
We will overthrow
the Soviets.
To End All Trade Agreements
"One of our first acts upon regain
ing Dower will be to make a clean
j swecp 0f ai soviet trade agreements."
I This includes the Kamchatka con-
! cessions granted the American syn
! dicate, headed by Washington D. Van
j deriip of Los Angeles. Kerensky said
i foreign capitalists with unparalleled
j .( vajiousness were bent upon looting
'::('' natural treasure houses of Rus
sia. Uniy a major military victory
over th bolshevik will save Russia
! f the exploiters, he said.
He
' ""Pressed confidence that the military
! Plans he is making will surprise the
world when their full force is revealed
(Continued on Page 6)
WOMAN IS HELD
N BIG PAYROLL
THEFT AT MIAMI
Special to the News. .
Miami, Jan. 11 With the arrest by
the police yesterday of Mrs. Mae
Crews and H. C. Evans, the number of
arrests here in connection with the
theft of $72,000 from the paymaster
, "f the U. S. destroyer Sattcrlee at
' Norfolk, Va., reached a total of five,
j The -man and woman are being held
material witnesses against Hal W.
T. Meyers, Merwin Ashmore and J. H.
Quigley, who were arrested here sev-
erai aays ago
It is alleged that Meyers, who was
a clerk in the office of the Satterlee's
paymaster, signed a receipt for the
$72,000 which was .sent to the de
stroyer for payrolls, on thf eve of a
cruise of several months, and that he
and the other two melt stole the mon
ey and same to Miami.
Ashmore and Quigley were arrested
on December 31 at the local express
office when hey called for baggage
that contained several thousand dol
lars, said to be a part of the stolen
money, and Meyers was arrested here
the following day.
KERF
K
ORGANIZING
MOVEMENT
T "'-

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