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Palatka daily news. [volume] (Palatka, Fla.) 1919-1994, March 08, 1921, Image 1

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TODAY'S
NEWS
TODAY
WEATHER .
Generally fair
It
0 VOL. II. No. 126
ALLIE
RED
RICH MANUFACTURING
CITIES OF HMD
OFFER 10 RESISTANCE
"Germany's Reparation Offers Sternly Rejected
v Next Step Is Problematical
, CBy United Press)
s With the Allied Armies in Germany March 8 Troops of the allied
nations marched across the Rhine today. " ff
I . In the early morning when the river mists were just beginning to
lift, long columns of French, British and Belgian soldiers, equipped and
rationed for war tramped over the bridges and into German cities of
Dusseldorf, Duisberg and Rurhort. "
On horse, on foot and on artillery thehy advanced into the Ruhr val
leyi Germany's rich mineral basin. As they Bwung into the narrow
k : streets of the old cities people popped out of windows and doors to see
what was happening. No opposition was met anywhere.
REPARATIONS OFFER STERNLY REJECTED
(By United Press)
London, March 8 The German reparations commission, its pro
posals sternly rejected by the allies and with allied armies rushing for
ward on to German soil as a result, left London at 2 P. M. today. For
eign Minister Von Simons, at the ast minute, showed somje bitterness,
declaring that the inflliction of penalties now would hamper future a- 1
greements.
It is now believed that economic pressure will begin Thursday when
when a customs line will be established parallel to the Rhine to a depth
of about nineteen miles. German customs houses will be seized and a
Jax-of thirty per cent will be levied on alt German goods. , -r. rr-;-,-
Rich Cities Submit Peacefully
" fBy United Press.)
Paris, March 8 The rich manu
facturing cities of Dusseldorf, Duis
berg and Ruhrort submitted to allied
control at 6 a. m. today when the Bri
tish, French and Belgian troops
marched across the Rhine to assume
possession. The occupation iwas ac
complished without accident, -the
French war office announced. The
German burgomasters had been in
structed by IBerlin not to interfere.
Allies Were on Move Early.
(Br Vnlteal PrtM.)
London, March 8 Although Mar
shal Foch did not receive his orders
from the allied leaders until late yes
terday a telephone message from
Dusseldorf, via Amsterdam, said that
the French were on the move early in
the afternoon. Three ship loads had
slipped up the Rhine past Coblenz be
fore 6 o'clock it was stated and ten
others were known to be en route
north. The position of the Ameri
can army at Coblenz was obscure, but
it was certain they were to take no
part in the advance.
F
F
L
SUCCESSOR KILLED
(llT United Prraa.)
Dublin, March 8 Mayor George
Clancy and' former Mayor O'Calla-
ghan of Limerick, were shot to death
in their homes there early today.
jClancy's wife was wounded. Early
rerports did not reveal the xause of
the shooting. - '
START BRIDGE ON ROAD
. SAVANNAH TO TYBEE
Savannah, Ga., March 8 The first
concrete for the foundation of one of
the three bridges to be employed in
connecting Tybee with Savannah over
an automobile highway was poured
Saturday. This is a district de-
dlopment and marks a new step in
the construction of this Tiighway
which is to be finished the latter part
of 1922.
PAUL POTTER DIES.
New York, Marcg-J'aul M. Pot
' ter, dramatic critic, who was the au
thor of many popuhw plays-, was
found dead today of natural causes in
the Murray Hill baths. .
ARMER MAYOR u
HMD
IT IS NEWS TODAY.
!'S HOBBY
IS TD HELP
H OJQTELLOWS
Washington, March 8 In a short
tall; last evening at the National
Press club's "Hobby Night" enter
tainment President Harding declared
his favorite hob'oy was to help the
fellow who is down arid out
"If there is romewhere a human
touch that awakens disappointment
into hope," he saidL"that is the fin
est hobby in the world. If in my new
responsibility I can in understanding
and sympathy and in stern devotion
to country find the touch that trans
formes the disappointments of yester
day into the fruition of tomorrow,
then I shall have practiced the dear
est hobby, to me, in the world."
Mr. Harding's short speech was
made from his theater box in ac
knowledgment for the entertain
ment, at which he and Mrs. Harding
were guests of honor.
President Harding in beginning his
brief talk which was filled with
phrases common to a -printing plant,
said he "could not "decline an as
signment." '.'I have always had a reverend re
gard for these people of the press,"
he added, "and I confess I have a
higher one tonight than I ever had
before in all my life. I knew that
those who make the newspapers and
Journals of our land in there is a
distinction were evceedingly bright
and ever - alert and I have lately
come to know that they know more
than executives, congress and the
cabinet put together and I have learn
ed from them things I am doing and
going to do that I never knew myself.
ALEXA STIRLING GOES TO
SEEK MORE GOLF HONORS
nr Vnltrd Pii.)
New York, Mar. 8 Miss Alexa
Stirling, America's woman champion
golf player sails today for England
td start training for the British
championships starting May 30.
"I know I have a task on my hand
to win the title, something no other
American woman has done. That's
the reason I am getting such an early
start," she said here today.
Miss Stirling also will compete in
the French , championships starting
June 14.
D01
PALATKA. FLORIDA,
IS
E
I
HERBERT WILSON PRESIDENT
AND H. M. FEARNSIDE
SECRETARY
SECRETARY DIXON
COMES TOMORROW
Song Leader Stone Is Working With
School Children Plans of Or
ganization Palatka's Community Welfare As
sociation was made permanent yes
terday afternoon at a meeting held at
the Court House, F. H. Wilson was
made permanent chairman and H. M.
Fearnside permanent secretary.
It was decided to ask each of the
civic and fraternal organizations and
each church of the city, name two
members of the Welfare Council, and
from this council will be selected an
executive committee. Just as soon
as all of the organizations have nam
ed their members for this council an
other meeting will be held, the direc
tors selected and the work launched.
Fild Secretary Dixon, of the na?
tional association, who is Raw in
Gainesville," is " expected here 'tbmor-'
row to confer with the local officials
of the organization and to give di
rections how to proceed.
Song Leader Stone has been here
for some days and has been leading
some songs at the schools. He will
probably be stationed here during the
organization period under experts
from headquarters.
There has been no discussion, as
yet, as to the first thing to be under
taken, but throughout the entire pro
gram of activities the wefare of the
girls will be as carefully looked after
as the boys, especial emphasis having
been laid on failure of many com
munities to give the same opportun
ities for amusement and develop
ment as they have offered to boys.
ROTHS TALK
BIRMINGHAM MEET
B
Rotarians discussed a variety of
topics at today's luncheon, chief
among which was the annual district
convention at Birmingham on March
27-28-29 and the progress of the Com
munity Welfare Association, receiv
ed reports of committees and receiv
ed two new members, F. H. Wilson
and J. F. Blake.
Secretary Fearnside reported the
forming of a permanent organization
for the Community Welfare Associa
tion and that Secretary Dixon from
National headquarters will be here
tomorrow. I
An appeal from the state organiza
tion of the European Relief Council,
addressed to the ocal chairman, W.
P. Merriam, was read, asking the Ro
tary Club to assist in the campaign
for funds to relieve the starving pop
ulation of Europe. On motion it was
unanimously agreed that Chairman
Merriam will be given every assist
ance possible by each member of the
Rotary Club. So far no organization
has been formed here, nor has any
work been done.
The Boys Committee will have
charge of, next Tuesday's luncheon
and discuss work outlined and already
accomplished.
TRAIN CUTS MAN IN TWO
Statesville, N. C, Mar. 8 H. C.
Wilson, 65, prominent business man
of this city was instantly killed about
noon today when his body was sever
ed by a shifting train at a railway
crossing here He was in a truck
which was crossing the track.
I ' . : . .
WELFARE SERVICE
QRGANIZAT
ID
PERMANEN
AND WELFARE JO
HISTORY TOMORROW
TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 1921
SEVEN ALDERMEN
TO BE SELECTED
TODAY'S
DELEGATES TO MAYOR'S CON
- VENTION ALSO WILL BE
CHOSEN
THREE NAMES IN
MAYOR'S CONTEST
Leav Result Uncertain Until Friday
Night Registration Light, Few
I ' Women Qualifying
Seven aldermen will be nominated
at tonight's primary to be held in six
cf thjp seven wards of the city, one
from- five wards and two from the
sixthj Ward Four. Delegates to the
nominating convention which will se
lect 4 )na.vor will also be chosen to
nigh St;and it is for the selection of
thesofthat the contest is most spirited
The candidate for mayor are the
present incumbent, W. P. Merriam,
H. M, Fearnside and Dr. A. M. Steen.
Neither of the candidates have an
nounced policies which they will ad
voca if elected except in a general
way. "i Mr. Fearnside said a few days
ago that hisjirst efforts, if elected,
would be to provide a commission
form, of government, for Palatka, be
Hett4at..thia, has been "ctearjy de?
monstrated as the most successful
and cheapest way to govern a muni
cipality. Twenty delegates to the mayor's
convention are to be selected, and so
warm is the fight that it is under
stood an effort will be made to have
all of them go to the convention in
structed. There are also several
warm fights for aldermen and not in
years, according to those who have
resided here for a long time, has so
much interest been displayed in a city
election. While the contest is per
fectly friendly as between the candi
dates, and there is a conspicuous ab
sence of any' personality between
them, nothing of a legitimate nature
is being left undone by either fy win
out.
Where and When to Vote.
The primaries for the various
wards will be held at eight o'clock.
Following is a list of the polling
paces for each ward and the number
of delegates to be elected:
Ward 1 Gay's warehouse, 1 alder
man, five delegates.
Ward 2 Pound's store, one alder
man, three delegatets.
Ward 3 Morning Post office, one
alderman, four delegates.
Ward 4 City Hall, two aldermen,
four delegates.
Ward 5 Court House, one alder
man, two delegates.
Ward 7 Buick Garage, one alder
man, two delegates.
Election Day Changed
In former years the regular elec
tion of city officers hasbeen held on
the first Tuesday after the first Mon
day in the month of April. Accord
ing to the city charter this is an er
ror, and was just recently discovered.
The charter provides that the election
shall be held on the third Monday in
April between the hours of ten and
four o'clock. . This would make the
election this year on April 18. The
nominations tonight, and the one to
be made for mayor on Friday night,
will, of course be elected, but as the
number of delegates from each ward
to the mayor's convention is comput
ed on the basis of the number of votes
cast at the eleotion the year preceding
efforts are made in each ward to get
out as large vote as possible.
NOW CONSIDER FUTURE
TRADING IN REFINED SUGAR
New ,York, March 8 .Advisability
of inaugurating futures trading in re
fined sugar, with delivery in Chicago,
the center of the best sugar industry,
is being considered by the board of
managers of the New York coffee and
sugar exchange, it was announced
here today.
MMT
HANDS
PETROGRAD IS FIRMLY
ENSKY
Every Bolshevik Commissar in Capital Either Cap
tured or Killed By Revolutionists
(By United Press)
Helsingfors, March 8--Red troops, aided by Chinese mercenaries,
attempted to stem the rebel march on Petrograd at Aschostrow late yes
terday afternoon but were repulsed by heavy fire from the battleship
Petrohvlosk. Revolutionaries were reported to have strengthened their
hold on Petrograd and the surrounding territory, dispatches received
here stated.
Revolutionists were reported to have either killed or captured every
bolshevik commissar in Petrograd.
""" KERENSKY RECEIVES CONFIRMATION
Paris, March 8 The former Russian premier, Alexander Kerensky,
has received a dispatch from well-informed members of his party fully
confirming the accounts already published of the revolt in Peerograd,
where, according to a brief late dispatch from Helsingfors, the 'move
ment tends to spread and grow stronger.
As regards Moscow, M. Kerensky says the counter movement ap
pears somewhat weak but in the regions near the frontiers the commun
ists are panic-stricken. The commissaries are fleeing and troops of
doubtful loyalty are being disarmed.
TAYLOR URGES
REORGANIZATION
IN TENNESSEE
Nashville, Tenn., March. 8 Com
plete re-organization of the state gov
ernment was recommended to the
State Legislature in a message today
from Governor A. A., Taylor, when
the legislature re-convened after its
recess.
The governor called for centraliza
tion of state government into seven
or eight departments, abolition of a
number of state offices as unnecessary
and the extensive legislation of state
functions by a committee of three;
one from the house, one from the sen
ate, and one to be appointed by the
governor.
The message was a direct answer of
the republican executive to a chal
lenge from the democratic legislature
in regard to a previous message he
had addressed to the legislative body
in which he asked the abolition of
useless offices. The legislature asked
the govenor to be more explicit and
to'name the offices he considered use
less. In his message, Governor Taylor
asked, among other offices, the aboli
tion of the tax statistical department,
most of the offices of which are filled
by staunch supporters of the former
democratic administration and who
are presumably in the favor of the
democratic majority in the legisla
ture. Governor Taylor's suggestions for
re-organization of the state govern
ment is along the lines effected in
Illinois, Wisconsin, Nebraska and oth
er states which have sought central
ization of the executive functions of
the state government.
SOLUTION OF DOMESTIC
PROBLEMS IS DISCUSSED
nr I nltcd Frew..)
Washington, March 8 Drawing of
a program for solution of the domes
tic problems facing the government
occupied Harding's cabinet tt the first
session which lasted more than two
hours today. It was understood the
President outlined to the cabinet con
clusions which had been reached at
the conference with congressional
leaders last night.
PACKERS CUT WAGES OF
WORKERS 12 PER CENT.
Chicago, March 8 Wages of 200,
000 employes of packing companies
were cut twelve and a half per cent
today. The basis of an eight hour
day also placed in effect during the
war waa also abolished. The deci
sion affects 30,000 employes here.
The remainder are in the other elev
en principal market centers of the
country.
PRICE FIVE CENT t
OF REVOLT;
TO BEOBSEHVED
Washington, March 8 The Secre
tary of Commerce, Mr. Alexander is
giving his hearty support to the pro
ject of the fishery societies of the
country designating March 9 as Na
tional Fish Day, and he is urging the
people everywhere to aid in making
the day a success by having fish for
at least one meal on that date. He is
asking, also, that the dealers coop
erate wholehearted by affording their
cusomers an opportunity to buy the
best fish at reasonable prices and that
they advertise the occasion not only
in the public press but by attractive
displays of fish and other sea foods
in their places of business. The beau
ty and strangeness of form and color
exhibited by the great variety of fish
es have made the public aqariuims of
the world the most attractive of ed
ucational exhibits and not a little of
this interest can be sustained and
sales stimulated by the neat, clean,
and orderly arrangement of the stalls
when they are sold for food pur
poses. COSTA RICA WITHDRAWS
TROOPS; WAR IS OVER
(By lulled Press.)
New Orleans, March 8 The United
Press today received a wireless mes
sage from President Acosta of Costa
Rica, announcing that in compliance
with the American ultimatum the
Costa Rican troops would cease their
attack on Panama. Retirement and
demobilization of Costa Rica's forcea
was ordered yesterday, Acosta said.
TWO KILLED WHEN PLANE
FALLS FROM GREAT HEIGHT
Louisville, Ky., Mar. 8 Lieutenant
John T. Lawson, of Hartford, Conn.,
and Private Joseph Kead, of Norwood
N. J., were dashed to death at Camp
Knox near here when an army air
plane failed to right itself during a
tail spin. The machine fell enarly
3,000 feet.
The men were making a practice
flight Lieutenant Lawson was 24
years old. Private Read was 21.
GEORGIA HOTEL BURNS
Br Unit Press.)
fRom, Ga., March 8 The mate
wing of the Armstrong hotel, a six
story brick and stone structure waa
completely gutted by fire today. The
loss is estimated at $100,000.
DAY TOMORROW
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