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Palatka daily news. [volume] (Palatka, Fla.) 1919-1994, March 09, 1921, Image 1

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TODAY'S
NEWS
TODAY
Ml
SS&tra
IT IS NEWS TODAY. HISTORY TO M O R R OW
ll " . '
1 i$PL. II. No. 127
, PALATKA, FLORIDA, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9, 1921
GERMANY IS
SUBMISSIVE
ALDERMEN NIB;
CLOSE CONTEST IS
TO DEMANDS
OF INVADERS
ALLIES PITCH CAMPS IN OLD
AND HISTORIC CITIES OF
RHINELAND
NO RESISTANCE
BEING OFFERED
Schools and Art Museums Being Used
to Biilet Soldiers Customs
- Houses Are Seized
FOR
MAYORALTY
GAY, PURSLEY AND NOTTAGE
WILL BE BACK IN THEIR
OLD PLACES
CHIEF INTEREST
IN MAYOR'S RACE
Two Wards Instructed For Dr. Steen
and One For H. M. Fearnside
Will Nominate Friday Night
CONGRESS WANTS
HARDING'S IDEA
OF ADEQUATE WHY
PRFSIDENrS REFERENCE HAS
ONLY BEEN OF GENERAL
NATURE
AMERICAN
DOUGH
BOYS TO REMAIN
ON RHINE LONGER
HARDING CANNOT CARRY OUT
v PLAN TO RECALL THEM
JUST YET
nFNRY WANTS ALL PROGRAM MAPPED
WORK CONTINUED OUT . FOR FUTURE
Expected That Conference WiH $te Many Important Matters Taken Up
Held on Advisability of Reviv :- and Plans Made For Carrying
. imr Old Bill' . I Them Out
ceat
5
ng in
only
ixceeded
',000,000
ANDERSON HERE
tn ni mi rnn
iu -rum runo
SUGA1REFINERY
WILL CONSTRUCT THIS BEFORE
CANE MILLS PUT IN
OPERATION
bushels. ' .
. Almost half of the coosfcrytf
I .... - Yi
i-cord com crog of last' year reottfned
in farms March 1, more thorn a paxh
ter of the wheat crop and almost halt
of the large crop of oats, according
to the department of agriculture
estimates announced today.
NO CANE READY
FOR MILLS YET
But Will Be Plenty of Raw Sugar to
Refine All This Year's Crop
For Seed
, I It - ItB..H
With the Allied Armies in Germany
March 9 Surrender of all German
amis in the occupied areas was de
manded today by General Gaucher, j
commanding.
Strict search of all houses will fol
low failure to deliver weapons to the
military, he said. German police
were permitted to retain their bayo
nets and revolvers.
Military precautions were taken
against any possible uprising despite
the meek attitude of the German pop
ulation. Big guns reared their snouts
from positions in the parks and out
lying promentories. Belgian, French
and British soldiers paced designated
beats, arms ready for instant use.
' - The sentries were used principal
ly at the bridgeheads and at railway
stations to regulate traffic and to pre
vent infraction of the customs reguia
tions which are being formulated rap
. t Airplanes In relays oronwi vvci w
-nr.cn nied territory, observers watch
ing closely for any suspicious gather
wig or activity.
Barracks In Schools.
' Allied soldiers were bivouacked in
the parks last night behind machine
t... T-ater thev will De moved
into schools and other public build
which are being transformed
1nn harranks.
Officers were housed in hotels and
f flic niiMic buildings. The
Dviiiu v" . '
two main hotels were seized as quar
-., tr.r enmmanders of the various
linit.R.
General Degoutte, under whose sa
pervision the occupation maneuvers
nrrid out. installed himself in
v.o fanniii art academy in Dussel-
Wff. There, with his huge dotted
and streaked maps arranged among
marble pieces and famous paintings
and newly strung telephone and teie-
,v, Him nmninff alone the floors
the general received municipal and
provincial authorities to read, tnem
his proclamation.
Th German authorities, serious
faced but without any sign of resent-
Ueenpd resDectfully to tne
lilIl V -
TOO Hinir of the order which declared
tw. the allies had no animosity
W nonulation but were con
nnlv' with forcing the German
government to observe the terms of
the -peace treaty.
I'nnnlation Calm and Grave.
The populations of Duisberg, Ruh.
rort and Dusseldorff as well as those
of the outlying small 'towns evinced
much the same attitude as their rep
resentatives. All were calm and
grave, as,if endeavoring to show their
determination to bear any hardship
without complaining,
Tfc Allied soldiers frankly enjoyed
. themselves. " The British especially,
found rt easy to make friends with
1ia vonneer srenerations. Small boys
tagged the tommies about the streets
h irirls cave them sny smnea
m, Tteltrian appeared especially
exuberant at the prospect of city life
loavmir service m lsoiatea ais
tricts with other attraction than life
in camp. '
au;1 nfficers craickly took posses
sion of he German customs houses,
impounding all the currency found in
ithem, in order to prevent it ship
ments to interior Germany. The
nsual customs activities 'proceeded
with allied experts acting s guards,
Inspectors and off icers. In some cas
s the former officials were retained
to carry on the work under strict al-
t:J anna-TV? rIoIL.
Allied chiefs were reported today
to be considering throwing a cordon
Aldermen in six of the seven wards
of the city were named at last night's
primary, the nomination of an alder
man from the 'sixth, where thede is a
majority of colored voters, having
been made by the colored element
Monday night, E. E. Nottage, present
incumbent, being returned to office.
Delegates to the Moyor's convention,
which meets Friday night at the city
hall to nominate a mayor, were also
selected last night. '
The aldermen selected were:
Ward 1 B. I. Gay.
Ward 2 J. D. Pursley.
Ward 3 Harry Messmer.
Ward 4 L. A, Smith, J. L. Waits.
Ward 5 H. H. Van Home.
Ward 7 J. E. Johnson.
There were no contests in any of
the wards excent the fifth, where F.
E. Oliver was placed in nomination
against Mr. Van Home, Mr. van
Home winning by a good majority.
Selection of Delegates.
Contests for delegates to the con
vention. which was expected to be
spirited, did not develope, there being
few entries. This was due, howev
er, to withdrawal of some of the del
egates representing candidates when
a survey of the field indicated that
ih onnosition had the bulge on'.the
votes. At praencauy an i wns Rim
ing places there were a number or la
rfips who cast their ballots.
The delegates selected from the va
rious wards were as follows:
Ward 1 W. A. Walton, J. M. Wol-
fenden, N. O. Riles, L. W. Warren,
C. E. Rowton.
Ward 2 IB. C. Pearce, E. C. Jack
son, J. H. Yelverton.
Ward 3 A. A. Corcoran, John Mal-
lem, Tom Russell, W. L. Cheeves.
Ward 4 A. M. Hedick, J. 1). Bruce,
J. A. Ginn, E. D. Ferrell.
Ward 5 M. B. Cochrane, S. Mc-
Cormick.
Ward 6 Wendell Beasley, I. L. De-
Young, W. 0. Alexander.
Ward 7 H. A. Davis, K. h..- Kam-
sey.
Tn wards two and three the dele
gates were instructed to vote for Dr.
A. M. Steen for mayor. In ward nve
thev were instructed to vote for rt,
M. Fearnside. Those who proless to
know how the line-up stands claim
that H. M. Fearnside will be nommat
ed on the first ballot.
By Ralph H. Turner,
ITnKrd PrcM Stall CoiwsiWndeiit
Washington, Mar. 9 !ongression
al leaders have begun to demand that
President Harding define his idea of
an "adequate navy." The president's
reference to American naval policy,
they say, have been only general and
before the new naval appropriations
bill is introduced in the house they
wish to know more definitely where
the president stands. Al ready their
insistence has brought results.
Secretary of the Navy Denby, it
was learned today, will enter this
wek into a detailed study of the na
val bill which died in the senate with
the old congress. He will confer with
naval experts, chiefs of the various
bureaus, and prepare a summary ot
the salient points which he believes
tthmild be included in the. new bill.
This report, it is understood, either
will Vn enKm ittnl tn the president af
ter it3 completion, 6r will be the out-
growth of conferences between. Hard
ine and Denbv.
The president is expected to adopt
this method for an expression of his
views on America's naval program.
Secretary Denby intends to review
the situation before the extra session
of congress. When the session con
venes the houe will conduct new
hearings on the naval bill. Member
of house naval committfcee believe at
that time the new administration will
define its attitude on:
1. The prospects of a disarma
ment conference.
2. Continuance of the 1916 build-
ine program and the desirability of
new ships not yet provided for.
3. How the lessons of the war, in
cluding the use of aircraft and bal
loons are to be. incorporated in our
naval policy.
No suspension in construction is
expected because of the aggitation
for disarmament. Secretary Denby
holds that America should continue
to round out her fleet until a disar
mament agreement becomes areali
ty.
By Raymond tripper
T nltpil Pi-m Stall ftori'MiDonilcnt
) Washington, Mar. 9 American
trqops will be kept on the Rhine until
the flare-up between the allies and
Germany over reparations is settled
according to best information here
today.
President Harding had planned to
call the American army of occupation
out of Germany at once upon assum
ing office but the existing situation, it
is understood, makes this inadvisable
at present, that a withdrawal now
might be resented by the allies.
There is no intention, however, of
permitting the American troops to
participate in the occupation of ad
ditional German territory.
The situation in Europe is regarded
here as one of the reasons for the de
lay in summoning the' extra session
of congress. Another is that Hard
ing's policies on various domestic is
sues are still undefined even in his
own mind, a condition which would
prevent recommendation to congress-
(Continued on Vage 2)
T? P. AnHprson. engineer for the
. . . ,
Ask your dealer for
Martinez" -Cigery7
Havana. r . '
WILL "WIPE COUNTER-REVOLU
TIONISTS OFF EARTH" IS
. RED BOAST
WOMAN
PINELLAS WOULD
-S GLUB TO
El BIG PARTY
TO REDUCE DEBT
Plans have been made by the Wo
man's Club for a big party on the
evening of March 17, St. Patrick's
day at which time an effort will be
made to reduce the debt on the build
ing as much as possible. There will
be a buffet supper, speaKing py past
and present officers, as well as a list
of speakers not directly amuausu
with the club work.
Plans for the party were discussed
. meetincr held last night at the
residence of Mrs. Walter Tilghman,
the date, March 17, having been se
wtH because it is the twenty-fourth
anniversary of the organization of
the club here, the organization having
huTi nerfected in 1897.
Mrs. 'J. C McUoiium, oi utuneu
ville, president of the State Federa
tion of Women's Clubs, will De one
of the own of town guests and speak
on. rv,l 8. J. Hilburn has been ia-
noak on "What the Club
has meant to Palatka." Mrs. George
w Wolh. nast nreaident, Mrs. How-
oil riovia. nresident and Mrs crown,
vice president of the State Federation
DIVIDE STATE OR
REAPPORTION IT
Clearwater, Mar. 9 Unless the leg
islature makes provision for a reap
portionment of the senatorial and
representative districts so as to give
each section of the state its proper
representation, the Pinellas county
board of trade is going to stir up a
hornet's nest and let the hornets sting
where they may.
The organization has made this
threat in a set of resolutions duly
adopted and signed by its chairman
and three other members. The reso
lution says in the plainest, kind of
language: "If such . constitutional
right be longer disregarded we will
apply to the courts for redress, and if
such redress be refused for any rea
son we will proceed to secure a di
vision of the state as our last and on
ly alternative." '
along the west aide of the American
area in order to carry out their plans
in regard to customs collections.
will also be on the speakers' list
The special committee having in
charge the arrangments for the party
is composed of Miss Elizabeth Hutt,
chairman; Mrs. J. H. Haughton, Mrs.
Waymer, Mrs. W. W. Tilghman, Mrs.
F B. Price, Mrs. C. D. O'Neal, Mrs. A.
A. Corcoran.
The names of the sub-committees
are as follows: Mrs. J. H. Yelverton,
invitations; Mrs. H. A. Davis, speak
ers; Mrs. A. H. Hedicn, decorations;
Mrs. T. J. Barnett, supper; Mrs. S.
C. Stallings, serving; Mrs. E. D. Fer
rel, pledges; Mrs. A. A. Corcoran,
music; Mrs. T. E. Mobley, entertain
ment; Mrs. G. E. Welchfi tables.
PALATKA IS E ;
BECOME SUING;
CITY SAYS STONE
Palatka is to be a singing city. To
morrow evening at 7:45 o'clock, a
"community sing" is to be held m
the Woman's Club as the official be
ginning of a community music pro
cram which is one of. the objectives
of the Palatka Community Service
committee. AH people of the city
are invited to attend the affair. Song
leaflets will be provided for all by
those in charge. No admission fee
will be charged. This "sing" will be
the first of a series which will be held
here in the next few weeks. It is
planned to make the singing a per
manent feature of Palatka commun
ity life, provided it meets with the
approval of the townspeople.
The program will be under the di
rection of Erterson Stone of the staff
of National Community Service, Inc.,
who is in the city at the invitation
of the Palatka Community music pro
gram, to train leaders to carry on
that program and to demonstrate
community music here. He comes to
the city highly recommended. In the
last year he has worked in many of
the large cities of the east and south.
He is a university graduate and has
special degrees in music and com
munity music. His work in this field
has been the object of favorable com
ment in some of the leading musical
publications in this country.
I .
All townspeople are urged to attend
the sing. It is for the people of the
city and has been arranged only after
investigation had shown to the Pa
latka Community Service committee,
what programs of the kind have done
and are doing m other cities oi tne
south and of the country at large.
Mr. Stone has been working in the
city schools at the request of school
authorities. His work has been
warmly received. This week he is to
begin an institute for the training of
local leaders in song leading and
community singing. This class is
open to all who wish to attend. Mr.
Stone has had pronounced success in
leading similar schools in other cities
of the south. No fee is charged f-vr
the course. The Palatka Community
Service committee requests that all
those interested in music avail them-!
selves of this opportunity. Further
announcement with regard to this in
stitute will be made in the Palatka
Daily News. Mrs. E. L. Mann, chair
man of the music committee of Pa
latka Community Service wil furnish
such information as may be desired
relative to the school or to other
phases of the community music program.
United Sugar Corporation, arrived
here last night to make plans for the
construction of the big refinery which
the company will construct even be
fore the crushers are put in. Work,
Mr. Anderson said, will begin on the
refinery very shortly
"It may seem that we are getting
the cart before the horse," said Mr
Anderson, "in constructing the re
finery before we put in the cane mill
for securing raw sugar. The reason
for this is that we will be able to
handle a large amount of raw sugar
throuerh the refinery here before we
are able to secure a sufficient amount
of cane to supply our own raw ma
terial.
"As a matter of fact." Mr. Ander
son continued, "all of the cane we can
secure from this year's crop will be
needed for seed for next year's crop,
which means that we will have no
cane available for crushing until next
year. When it is ready we will have
the mill for crushing ready and can
then commence supplying the refin
ery.
Will Buy All Cane
Mr. Anderson said that the com
panv will buy all of the cane produced
in .this territory, whether the grower
has a tontract with the eompany-
not, or whether he has one acre or a
thousand. He said, however, that if
the farmers here didn't raise the
cane themselves that the company will
raise it. already having put in as
large a crop as they could secure seed
for.
Captain H. A. Johns, local repre
sentative for the corporation has just
returned from Palm Beach county
where he was able to secure 200 tons
of seed which will be put in imme
diatelv. This will practically com
plete the amount needed for the lands
owned bv the corporation.
Mr. Anderson is very enthusiastic
over the outlook and says that the
delay incident to securing a prospec
tive supply of raw material has sav
ed the company about $300,000 in the
price of machinery which has gone
down in the lat few months.
BROTHER OF CZAR
LEADING REBELS
Reported to Have Captured 5,000
Reds in Siberia Savinkoff Thinks
Uprising Will Fail
(By United Presn.) '
Moscow, March 9 "The petrograd
proletariat will wipe the counter rev
olutionaries off the face of the earth"
the government bulletin declared to
day. The bulletin- said:
"The Soviets have postponed for
one day the liquidation of the Kron-
stadt uprising. However, this breatn
ing spell is not intended for Czarist
officers and their isocial-revolution-ary
assistants who plan to bring the
situation to a bloody issue and then
flee to Finland."
GARBED AS ADAM,
TWO YOUNG MEN
HALED TO COURT!
One clad in an undershirt and the
other in a collar and a smile, two
voune white men were hailed into
court vesterday morning. The ex
act nature of the charge against them
is still undertermined, ut for self pro
tection they were lodged in jail for
ten days until they could secure some
clothing.
Several days ago reports came in
from the Peniel and Francis sections
that ttwo wild men had been seen in
that section. Other reports came
from other sections of the county of
two men, practically nude, had been
seen in the woods. Monday the re
nmQ became specific, naming the ex
act location where the men could be
fn.-firt and Sheriff Hagan planned to
investip-ate. The men were .traced
just over the Volusia county line,
where they were arrested Dy tne rut
nam officers and a Volusia deputy.
They were brought back to Palatka
and lodged in jail.
When artaiimed veysterday one of
the young men was forced to appear
,r .lnil nnlv in a rain coat.
Both were evidently well educated
.r,A o-nnrt aooearance, had they
possessed sufficient sartorial equip
ment to drape the symmetrical pny-
,;,.1. Thev were about twenty yars
of age and said they were from Chi
cago. They told i story ot naving
Ki held up and their clothing taxen
from them by highwaymen. Previous
a it was stated, they had torn
. tt- that thev were in a boat
whici. turned over and they lost their
clothing. Both were remanded to
jail for ten day during which time
nrnn
RLUU
u
NIT!
MEXICO IS URGED
ONNEHPRE
IDENT
mm
in ill
failL :'.
GOVUtNf
Czar's Brother Leading.
ly Inltfd Pre-. .
Zurich. March 9 The grand duke
Michael, brother of the former Czar,
is leading an antfbolshevik offensive
in Siberia and has captured 6,000
prisoners, it was stated here today .
by Polish representatives.
The errand duke was said to nave
assumed command of the forces re-
itn) hv General Semenoff. Be-
deVttri8enr$..ieaptiredJwj55.
hrst drive xmriy uuuuibvuw eu"a
taken, the report said.
Thinks Uprising Will Fail.
(Br United Press.
Warsaw, March 9 The Kronstadt
uprising against the bolsheviki prob
ably will fail, Boris Savinkoff, Ke
rensky's war minister, admitted in
an interview here today.
Savinkoff predicted, however, that
a peasant uprising in central Russia
will occur this spring and that the
workers will be joined by the red
army, overthrowing the bolshevists.
A monarchy or a democracy will
be established after the revolt, he
said, with the probability that a peas
ant Czar will be crowned.
Unofficial reports here today aid
the, red staff of the Moscow military
district had joined the rebels, and
that the latter had occupied the im
portant railway junctions of PskojJ
and Bologie, half way between Pet
rograd and Moscow.
By Ralph H. Turner
United Press Stnff Correspondent
Washington, Mar. 9 Early recog
nition of the Obregon government in
Mexico has been recommended
strongly to President Harding by El
mer Dover, his personal representa
tive in conveying a message to the
Mexican president.
It also was learned today that
Harding, on the day of his inaugura
tion, received Manuel Vargas, Obre
gon's representative in this country.
Vargas was presented by Dover, an
old political friend of Harding's and
reported to be the President's choice
for chairman of the Republican Na
tional Committee. Vargas conveyed
to Hardine a letter from Obregon, a
response to the Harding message
which Dover delivered to the Mexi
can executive fast January.
Bv this interchange of messages,
containing expressions of good will
froffl the President's of the two re- .
publics, the preliminaries have been
concluded and the road is open to ne-
e-otistions which should lead to Amer
ican recognition of flexico, m Dov
er's opinion.
they will communicate with relatives
in an endeavor to secure some more
clothes.
Hi
sb4
w-.:,m:
Yi1
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