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Palatka daily news. [volume] (Palatka, Fla.) 1919-1994, March 15, 1921, Image 1

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TODAY'S
.NEWS
v TODAY
E
WEATHER
, Generally fair
IT IS NEWS TODAY, HISTORY TOMORROW
VOL. II. No. 132
Britain Agrees to division of seas;
CROWD RESENTS ATTACK ON CLARA HAM0N
U.S. AGREES
TOPACIFICAS
ITS PART OF
PATROL DEAL
SIMULTANEOUS ANNOUNCE
MENT MADE IN UNITED
STATES AND ENGLAND
BRITISH TO TAKE
ATLANTIC AS JOB
At Same Time Washington Intimated
That Nation's Naval Strength to
Go to Western Seas
By Ed L. Keen
United Press Stun Correspondent
London, Mar. 15 Great Britain
and America have agreed to an amic
able "division" of the seas, according
to general belief here today.
As a result of, ''. the agreement, it
was believed, Great Britiain will po
- lice the Atlantic ocean, America the
. Pacific.
This impression was strengthened
by two announcements from London
and Washington on the same day.
rom Washington came the state
- merit that the Pacific fleet probably
will assume more importance than the
Atlantic.
From London came the announce
ment that Great Britain will reduce
hes naval budget by $70,000,000
thereby abandoning any thought of
competition with America's -naval
program.
There was a general belief here
; that friendly relations between the
United States and Great Britain
' would be greatly strengthened if
.America goes through with its pro
' posed program of concentrating naval
power in the Pacific.. There will then
no longer be any question raised by
the British as "to who America is
building against?" .
Reports from Washington that
America was considering putting its
fleet in the Pacific were regarded
here as indicating that the United
States wants to impress Japan with
its naval strength.
The presence of a big American
fleet in the Pacific will probably influ
. ence Japan that war with America
at the present time is not feasible,
.many experts believe.
MASONIC HOUSE
WARMING DATE
IS POSTPONED
It is announced by those in charge
of plans for the house warming of
the new Masonic Temple that instead
of being held on April 9 as was
originally planned, the celebration
will be held on May 6. This change
in plans was made necessary on ac
count of the fact tha.t Grand Master
Charles Ketchum of .Key West found
it Impossible to be present on that
date due to previous engagements and
the committee on arrangements an
nounced the change of date to May
6. The contemplated plans will make
this one of the largest and most im
portant events local Masons have ev
er staged in Palatka.
PALATKA DEGREE TEAM
GIVEN SIGNAL HONORS.
The degree team of Red Wing
Council D. of P., left today for Orl
lando to put on the degree work for
Cherokee council No. 12. There will
be candidates from all over the state
to be initiated. Over 100 delegates
will be present from Jacksonville to
eee the crack Palatka team work.
SENATE ADJOURNS
(By United Press
Washington, Mar. 15 The Sen
ate adjourned sine die at 11:30
today.
PfflHEE PESTS
BESIEGE HUMS
1
PRESIDENT HAS LITTLE TIME
EXCEPT TO LISTEN TO AP
POINTMENT PLEAS
SHIPPING BOARD
IS BIG PROBLEM
Reorganization of Governmental De
partments May Not Take Place
Despite Promises
By Raymond Clapper
United Press Stnlt Correspondent
Washington, Mar. 15 Patronage
troubles are forcing President Hard
ing to neglect temporarily the big
international problems demanding his
attention.
Even domestic questions are for the
most part untouched because about
ninety per cent .of the president's
working time since his inauguration
has been devoted to listening to"
claims of office seekers or their back
ers. .
Harding's worst difficulties center
in the shipping board. Because of the
demand of shipping and business men
generally that the new board be ap
pointed quickly, the president is de
voting most of his time to it, but he
has not found a suitable chairman.
He probably will lay his troubles be
fore the cabinet which meets todays.
The capinet is also ejerjefifed Id lake
up the question of reorganizing the
government department. Although
the quetion will be fully threshed out
during the next few cabinet meetings,
it is predicted that nothing of a
sweeping character will be undertak
en for many months probably not
until the next regular session of con
gress meets next December. Cabinet
members have decided that they can
do no more than make minor changes
within their own departments until
congress has enacted a law provid
ing for the shifting around of gusi
iness from one department to anoth
er. The decision to hold up for reor
ganization does not meet the approv
al of all of Harding's advisers, it is
known. Some of them believe that
unless the reorganization is accom
plished within six months, the popu
lar demand for it will have subsided
while the opposition to it will have
increased enough to defeat it. It is
impossible, however, to make sweep
ing changes without congressional
action.
President Harding expected to send
another batch of nominations to the
senate today. It was doubtful of the
shipping board would be among them.
He had counted upon securing James
A. Farrell, president of the United
States Steel Corporation as chairman
of the shipping board but Farrell
would not take the job. R. A. C.
Smith, former dock commissioner at
ew York, who was understood to be
his next choice is being vigorously
opposed by Republican political lead
ers in New York.
Meanwhile Harding is leaning on
Admiral Benson, the present chair
man, to keep the Board functioning
until new members can be selected.
Benson can continue on the board un
der Harding if he so desires, it is be
lieved. President' Harding is expected to
give his consent to an adjournment
of the senate today and this will leave
him free of congress until April 11,
when the 'extra session begins. He
will have a chance in the meantime
to clean up the bulk of his appoint
ments and formulate his legislative
policies.
BLISS IS NAMED THIRD
ASSISTANT STATE SECY.
By United Press.
Washington, March 15 Robert
Woods Bliss of New York, has been
named third assistant secretary of
state, it was learned today. Bliss
has spent a number of fears in the
American diplomatic service and at
present is head of the division of
western European affairs in the State
Department. His nomination Is ex
pected to go to the senate today.. ,
PALATKA. FLORIDA,
MISSION
10 TALK
HELPHE POLICY
WILL BE SIMILAR MOVE TO
THAT OF FRANCE IN SEND
ING VIVIANI
DELEGATION TO
BE HAND PICKED
Wish to Avoid, as Far as Possible,
Causing Any Friction With Pro
Irish Elements
By Ralph H. Turner
United Pfewt Stuff Correspondent
Washington, Mar. 15 The British
government has begun the organiza
tion of a special mission, which it
proposes to send to the United States
within the next month, according to
advises received here today in official
quarters.
The mission will formally convey
its congratulations and wishes of suc
cess to the new administration and
then proceed to the discussion of
numerous outstanding questions be
tween this government and Britain.
Among the subjects to be discussed
it was understood today, are an asso
ciation of nations, disarmament, Ger
man reparations and Britain's in
debtedness to the United States.
The first advices concerning the
British mission indiaate that it will
be headed by'three leading figures, a
statesman'- chosen -from -the highest
ranks of Britain's public men, a high
military officer and a representative
naval leader. Aides and secretaries
will complete the mission.
Select Delegation Carefully
The personnel of the delegation, it
it learned, is being chosen withtthe
utmost care, with the view of elim
inating any figure which might arouse
hostility among the strongly pro
Irish element in this county. The
British government is desirous, first
of all, to avoid any embarrassment
incident to the Irish question.
So far as can be learned here, the
civilian head of the commission has
not been determined, although H. H.
Asquith, former premier, and Win
ston Churchill have been mentioned
for the post.
The information reaching Washing
ton indicates that formal announce
ment of the mission will not be made
in London for another week or ten
days.
The British decision to send a mis
sion to the United States is in line
with the action of the French gov
ernment in appointing Rene Viviani,
former premier, to discuss foreign
affairs with the Harding administra
tion and may have been prompted by
the French move. According to the
interpretation here, it is part of an
effort to gain America's cooperation
in European affairs and is welcomed
by this government because of the op
portunity it affords the United States
to define its position after discussion
with the foreign representatives.
The administration's policy on the
European situation, it is believed,
may depend largely upon the results
which attend the coming of the Brit
ish and French missions.
TERRIBLE DAMAGE NEAR
HUSTON'S HOME TOWN
(By United Pre...)
Amite, La., Mar. 15 Damage esti
mated at approximately a half million
dollars has been done to strawberries
by recent rains and washouts. Grow
ers stated today' that many families
are homeless due to the swollen Amite
Former Native Lives Here
The above despatch from Amite
will be of especial interest here as this
is the native city of E. B. Huston, of
the News staff. Mr. Huston has no
interests there now, however, except
an I. O. U. from the Amite Times,
where he served as chauffer on the
old George Washington for a period. J
DELMONT TAKES BEATING
Philadelphia, Pa., March 15 Gene
Delmont, New York, surprised list
fane here last night when he stayed
the limit with George "K. O." Cha
oey, of Baltimore,
1
TUESDAY, MARCH 15, 1921
DISCREET CANUCK
DEFENDS NAME OF
"FIFI"
BEAUVAIS SAYS INTIMATIONS
IN DIVORCE SUIT ARE ALL
LIES
GLAD OF CHANCE
TO TELL VERSION
Will Refuse to Return to America and
Add to Annoyances of Financier's
f Wife
Bj United Press.)
White Plains, N. Y., Mar. 15
Justice Worschauser today grant
ed an indefinite adjournment of
the hearing of Mrs. "Fifi" Potter
Stillman's motion for additional
alimony and counsel fees, pending
the trial, of the divorce suit
brought by James A. Stillman,
multi-millionaire husband.
B j?. James P. Kelly.
United Press Staff Correspondent
Copyright 1921 by the United Press
"Montreal,' Que., March 15 Fred
Beauvais, the French Indian guide
named in Janles A. Stillman's divorce
suit, was found today by the United
Press. He was located in a suburb
of Montreal.
When " found him he was busily
engaged in' clipping the stories of the
Stillman -divorce case from the New
piii.
"It's a lie," he declared, angrily
tossing the clippings on the floor. He
made a sweeping denial of all the
charges alleged to have been brought
by the multi-millionaire New York
financier, connecting his name with
the case.
"This matter has been in court be
hind closed doors since last Novem
ber" Beauvais said emphatically,
speaking without a trace of an ac
cent. "It was made public at last
so that Mr. Stillman's charges impli
cating me could be given the fight
and refuted."
Not an Original American.
Beauvafs was very indignant at
having been referred to in the news
papers as an Indian and a half breed.
He considers himself a French Ca
nadian. Beauvais does not look like
an Indian. He has a polished, smooth
and courteous manner. He is well
dressed, apparently has plenty of
money and would not be out of place
in any drawing room. He seemed to
have been fully informed of all the
details of the case.
"'I don't want any publicity," he
said. Then he added:
"Fred Beauvais, the guide, is dead."
He declared he was through with
earning his living in that way.
Beauvais refused absolutely to
mention Mrs. Stillman.
"She shan't be discussed," he said.
"Her name shall never be bandied
about."
He declared he would not cross the
border again and that he would have
nothing.further to do with the case.
With regard to the reported raid
on the Stillman lodge in Quebec pro
vince during which shots were fired,
Beauvais said:
"The first I heard of that was when
I read it . in the newspapers. The
only shots I ever heard around the
place were those fired by young Jas.
Stillman, jr., who did a lot of shoot
ing at targets every day."
Beauvais spoke affcetionately of
young Stillman, who is 16 years of
age. He pointed affectionaTely at a
picture of the millionaire banker's
son which was on the mantel above
the fireplace in the luxuliously fur
nished room.
He refused to discuss the child,
Guy Stillman, in any way whatsoever.
I learned that Fred Beauvais and
his brother, Arthur, had been inter
ested in finding Isabel Armstrong,
formerly a nurse in the Stillman
household who was wanted as a wit
ness for Mrs. Stillman. Arthur said
she was finally located at Pasadena,
California, but that lawyers for Still
man had secured her consent to tes
tify in his behalf, and that she had
returned east for that purpose. Ar
ST Lull
T
GETS WIRE BOOST
! CHAMP VAMP PULLS ONE OVER
ON UNITED PRESS AND WE
FALL TOO
SAYS PUBLIC IS
"CROOL TYRANT"
Will Not Let Her Pull Virtuous Stuff,
So, Ah, She Must Make Frails
Weep Again
By Richard D. Jacobs
United Press Stnff Correspondent
New York, Mar. 15 The day of
the vampire is waning, Miss Theda
Bara declared in an interview with
the United Press today.
The actress who has been absent
from the screen for a year and a half,
following a nervous breakdown re
sulting from overwork and the unusu
al strain of her roles, said she plan
ned to return soon but not in the
characterizations that made her fa
mous. .Henceforth, she said, she will ex
emplify "the virtuous vampire."
; 'personally, I would prefer to play
"Puritan" roles such as Evangeline
and Priscille,". she said. "The por
tion of the public which does me the
honor of liking my work won't per
mit me to do that, however. Since I
have been resting. T hv T.oivH
i more letters irom movie tans than
ever before, and the tenor of these
communications is:
"Do not give up your vampire
parts, but play them with a happy
ending the Magdalene's return to
virtue."
Actorines Not Own Boss
"I don't believe that any actor or
actress is great enough to do exact
ly as they want to, in opposition to
the wishes of the public. Pleasing
the theater goers is the sole excuse
for their existence. For that reason,
I intend to follow the suggestion
made to me."
Miss Bara was asked whether, in
her belief, men or women had been
most interested in her vampire roles.
"Women!" She replied emphatical
ly. "Women who had been treated
badly by men came to see me on the
screen and felt, "ah, here is one of
us who is able to treat men as they
deserve."
Asked to what she attributed the
changing sentiment of the American
people, from extreme materialism to
sane morality, she said:
"No one can know: It is one of
those incomprehensible, intangible
thur said he had just come back from
New York where he had consulted
with Mrs. Stillman's attorneys.
Arthur also said he had never
heard of any fight of any kind during
his period of employment with the
Stillmans, and he ridiculed the report
that a quarrel had taken place in
which shots were exchanged, at the
Quebec place.
"I have been annoyed for some
time by a New York detective," Fred
Beauvais said. It was not until he
was certain that I was not a detec
tive, that he would talk.
"I feel very indignant at being re
ferred to as a half-breed," he said
with an air of annoyance.
"Our family is one of the oldest
in Quebec."
He hastanedto produce documents
to trace his line of ancestry.
"The statement, which has been
printed, that I have recently been at
Tarrytown is entirely false" Beauvais
said. "I formerly was manager of
the Stillman properties at Quebec and
Tarrytown, but the last time I was in
Tarrytown was over a year ago.
"The police chief of Tarrytown is
very much mistaken when he says I
was seen there a short time ago. He
described me as a man over six feet
tall and weighing more than two hun
dred pounds. That is absurd, as you
can see for yourself." '
Beauvais stood np for my inspec
tion. He did not look like a six foot
er or a two hundred pounder. Be
said Ms height, was five feet ten in
ches and that ho weighed 162.
LOO FOR
HEDA
BACK ON SCR
EEN
PRICE FIVE CENTS
COURT ROOM
IS CLEARED
10 PREVENT
DISORDERS
PROSECUTION DECLARED SMITH
FAMILY LIVED ON SHAME
., OF DAUGHTER
WILD BILL TAKES
PART OF ACCUSED
Said Girl's Mother "As Good As That
of Any Lawyer Prosecuting Her
For This Killing."
WANT TO MARRY CLARA
By United Press
Ardmore, Okla., Mar. 15 Clara
Smith Hamon has fifty proposals
for marriage, he attorneys said
today.
The cosmic urge for the chic
and pretty defendant has caused
fifty men over the country to
swamp her with proposals of marriage.-
...i'vwi AA.-v-i.-. ..."... ..,,-
"I don't care whether you are
found guilty or innocent, I want
to marry you anyway," said one
ardent lover. He enclosed his
photograph.
.1
By Carl Victor Little.
United Press Staff Correspondent
Court House, Ardmore, Okla., Mch.
15 Charges that Clara Smith Ha
mon's mother and family lived "oni
her daughter's shame," temporarily
broke up the Hamon murder trial to
day, i
"We can show that the whole Smith
family lived on the Hamon estate,"
said prosecutor Brown. "Wild Bill"
McLean jumped to his feet and yell
ed: "This girl's mother is as good as
any who ever gave birth to any law
yer in this case."
Handclapping and shouts of appro
val indicated very clearly how the
packed court room stood on the issues
The confusion was tumultuous and
the court ordered the room cleared.
This required some time, and the
noon adjournment came before any
testimony had been taken. The row
occurred while points of legality in
submitting the statement of the de
rendant without privelege on the
part of the state to cross examine
her.
Defendant On Stand
After the noon recess the accused
took the stand and declared that she
killed Jake Hamon in self defense to
protect her mother's name and to save
her own life. She declared Hamon
hit her with a chair as the pistol she
held fired.
"He was drunker than ever before"
when she killed him, she said, and
that he had attacked her savagely,
threatening to "slit her throat.?
The defendant said that she had
married Hamon's nephew "for con
venience" but had never lived with
him. Tears streamed down the girl's
face as she told her story.
things that we can only wonder at.
We can't even know how long it will
last.
"Some psychologists may argue
that we are now undergoing one of
those periodic eras of so-called refor
mation that have always been a part
of history. But frankly I don't know.
Perhaps it is the reaction from the
war. What ever it is, the evidences
of a change are more noticeable in
this country than elsewhere. Cer
tainly we cannot say honestly that the
morale plane is any higher in Ger
many, France or Russia than it baa
been.

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