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Palatka daily news. [volume] (Palatka, Fla.) 1919-1994, March 19, 1921, Image 1

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A
V
TODAY'S
NEWS v
TODAY h. '
'el
IT IS NEWS TODAY, H I S T O R Y T O M O R R OW
VOL. II. No. 136
PALATKA. FLORIDA, SATURDAY, MARCH 19, 1921
V
r
CAB
INET TELLS HARDING MUST E
ERESTS DEFE
G
ENT
DEPRESSION
LINKED WITH
ISSUE 10
WILSONIDE
HOOVER AND MELLON CAN SEE
NO OTHER WAY TO .RE
LIEVE FARMER
OVER PRODUCTION
FOR HOME CAUSE
Raising a Tariff Wall Around Country
Will Not Help, and May Cause
Europe to Retaliate
By -Ralph H. Turner
I'nltcd Vrenn StwIT CoreMiiniIent
Washington, Mar. 19 Eco-.
nomic 'depression in the United
States has been linked definitely '
with the league of nations issue,
it developed today as an out
growth of yesterday's cabinet
meeting. A section of the cabi
net, it was learned, holds the view
, .1.1. UK"
its jnDJ f
Oiler 1 thev
I voice
4 na-
Wesent
LENINE DESERTS
communi
IFOR
RROPR ETORSHIP
BEISELLION FORCED HIM
MAKE SWITCH AT LAST
MINUTE
TO
STAND ENDORSED
BY CONGRESSMEN
Reports Show Uprising Against Red
' Government Is Spreading
Over Russia
eans of reliev-
C investmet.. 'llad
' This cannot be a
say, Unless America ha
in whatever association
tions results from the i
. discussion.- - y 5
.According to the opinion "expressed
at the cabinet meeting, the condition
of the American farmer and stockman
is much more critical than generally
realized. It is premature to of
business "picking up," it was decid,
,untit the farmers obtain relief. Jhe
fact also was considered that thev
erage American does not yet anre
ciate'that the condition of the aM-
culturist, unless relieved, will bere
fleeted ultimately in all branches of
business and industry. Cabinet meiv
bers admit that this far a solution
has not been found.
Tariff Not the Remedy
It is understood now that President
Harding, in his reluctance to desig
nate the tariff as the first matter for
congress to consider, had had in mind
its possible effect on the general
world situation,, The belief is in
" creasing that a tariff wall cannot aid
the farmer, who is producing more
than is consumed in he United States
and may be injured in his chances of
selling abroad, if a tariff barrier U
erected against foreign countries.
Secretaries Hoover and Mellon, who
are considered as representative of
the "business point of view, are con
sidered to have emphasized yester
day that what America needs is in
creased business abroad. They recog
'nize, however, that few foreign na
tions can pay the United States in
gold and that payment in raw pro
ducts is one of the causes that is ag
gravating the critical market condi
tion at home.
They propose, therefore, that
America must begin the purchase of
foreign securities, invest in public
utilities and other projects abroad
and distribute her wealth as Great
' Britain did when she reached the peakJ
as a creditor nation.
Pointing the Way to Harding
Hoover and Mellon are understood
to have urged before the President
that not only was this the best course
to relieve Jhe foreign exchange sit
uation and provide an outlet for sur
plus American products but that it
- offered the best opportunity for the
co'lection of America's foreign debt
At this point the league issue en
ters. The president has been advis
ed, jt developed today, that American
business will not invest its money in
the undeveloped parts of th world
unless America is to have a hand in
directing world affairs, along with
the other nations that compose the
league.
(By I ulted Prcm.)
Paris, Mar. 19 Premier Le
nine, addressing the communist
congress in Moscow, virtually
abandoned communism and advo
cated peasant proproetorship in
its stead, according to a dispatch
to the Herald from Revel today.
The Bolshevik leader also urg
ed granting of liberal concessions
to foreign capitalists. The con- '
gress endorsed his stand.
The agency of the Russian union
has received advices from Helsingfors
declaring that the uprising against
the bolshevik government has spread
throughout Russia. While the out
break was said to have been "prema
ture" it was stated that great num
beV's of pV.antsiin the Volga1 region
rcction burning oviei offices and im
prisonment of red officials: , '
1 FAMOUS HUMORIST DEAD.
(11 I'nltrd l'renx.)
Chicago, March 19 Bert Leston
Taylor, well known humorist and
conductor of a column in the Chicago
Tribune, died today of pneumonia.
CHAUTAUQUA TO
BE BOOSTED BY
L
0
PATRO
s
LAST BONUS
PERIOD FOR '
CONTEST TO
CLOSE TODAY
I
FEVERISH ACTIVITY AMONG
SOME OF CANDIDATES
DURING WEEK
THREE WORKING
DAYS ARE LEFT
Plans for insuring the success of
Redpath Chautauqua which opens
a five engagement from March 30
April 4 are being made by those
stand sponsor for the high class
enlrtainment wmcn nas Deen secur
ed Vr this year. Indifferent attrac
tion! and an indifferent public during
the 1st few years have contributedj
to Tatier disappointing results of
such bidertakings. But it was de
cided Vis year to get the very best
that tfere is in the way of attrac
tions aW try to arouse interest lo
cally.
The Cfeutauqua will be under one
of the faVous Redpath tents and the
managemht of all the details of the
programs Vill be in the hands of Red
path expert. Season tickets will be
disposed ofYor J3 per adult person,
plus ten perWt war tax. Children's
tickets for n uner twelve years of
age, will be Wd for the season ior
$1.50, plus vr tax. These tickets
fourteen programs,
day there will be a
each morning, at
especially adapted
e rendered. Then
Judges Will Take Charge of jUl Rec
ords Promptly at 8 O'clock Next
Wednesday Evening
This evening at 8 o'clock the last
bonus period in The News' big sales
manship campaign will come to a
close.
Three more days in which-to boost
totals will remain. Th"e handsome
Studebaker car may be won or last in
those three days.
During the last week there has
been unusual activity on the part of
some of the candidates, while others j
have rested on their laurels and earl
lier efforts, In fairness to all candi
datoeijjM) Inkling of theic relatiyj.
standt.gs"Ts vi"outr Tie- purpose
of - this 4b obvious.' . It is to prevent
bidding at the last minute. It is to
see that the candidate who puts m
the' most effective work wins the big
Many o the candidates seem tj be
overlooking the second, thihrd and
fourth prizes, in each of the districts.
A little more work on 'the part of
some will insure their success in win
ning one of the handsome phono
graphs or .cedar chests. Either of
these prizes is well worth several
weeks' hard work.
Judges to Take Charge
Wednesday evening at 8 o'clock
sharp the contest comes to a final
close. This dees not mean "one min
ute after eight, but eight o'clock.
When the clock on the Presbyterian
church tower strikes eight not anoth
er return will be received and the en
tire record of the- contest will be
turned over to the judges, and into
their sole keeping will be placed the
books and receipt forms turned in by
the contestants, and they will make
up the final totals.
The judges will be J. H. Haughton,
J. C. McCrocklin and C. E. O'Connor.
This insures that the auditing of the
books, careful scrutinizing of all re
sords and fair dispensation of justice
to auu will be beyond question.
The contest has been entirely sat
is factory to The News. It has
i i . y
11 r hha
1 1 n imp lu n 1 n I
NTER "A LEAQ
FARMER'S TROL
IS ENJOYED AT
PATRONS
SPECT
MARK
' IN
ND TAXPAYERS IN
ANDSOME NEW
UILDINGt
NEW ERA
HIS COUNTY
Next Need, Is High School, as Present
Structurt Already Taxed Beyond
CAPACITY
Each fiature of the program for
the Mellol School house-warming last
night inflhe school auditorium con
tributed to the feeling of gratitude
and cielilit over the possession of
such a xndsome institution of learn
ing. Ery citizen of Palatka and of
the whfe county, no doubt feels
proud (..the completion of this hand
some Wilding. . '
The Evening s program was opened
with chorus from the primary de-
partnilit. The speakers of the oc
casioi together with J. R. Mellon and
Courw Superintendent Price, were
seatel on the rostrum when the cur
tainvent up a second time and after
a sog which Emerson Stone led, Mr.
Pric read a telegram from Prof.
Rilu ot the Extension Division of the
Uni ursity of Florida which stated
thattyis car was out of commission at
Hawworne and that he would be un-
niu-.e ms aauress.
S'lpt Price of the county board of
edutation introduced as first speaker
of tie evening, W. H. Cassels, prin-
cipa of the city schools, who made a
will be good
After the fir
children's hou
winch program
to children
there will be a pAirram in the after
noon at 8:30j'clTk and again at 8
o'clock in the" everW.
The list of atfWtions includes:
Artists Four, singeA and players;
Georpe L. McNutt, mous lecturer;
Irene Stolofsky Com tony of artists;
Harry L. Fogleman, Atling gun lec
turer; Dunbar's White jussars; Beu
lah Buck; Dr. E.- T. Hlgerman, lec
turer; Nothing But the V-uth, one of
the moat delightful of a American
comedies produced by aWew Yorlc
cast; Crobeeker's SwissWodellers;
Evelyn BaTgelt, csK.oons nd read
ings. '
served the purpose for which it was
intended thc increasing of circula
tion into the remotest sections of the
county. It was not designed 'as 1
money-making scheme. Any busi
ness man can easily determine that
there can be no profit in such an un
dertaking, but that there can be 1
very decided value in the service hich
The News can render its advertisers
through broader and more general
distribution throughout this territory
The volume of money taken in will
be but little larger than the actual
cost of the prizes, and for the next
two years, and more, The News will
be delivering service for every dollar
of this money.
ified league" as a means o aiding
her eeonq jic position,- todayVormed
one of the "Most striking corWdera
tions that li developed nndV the
Thus America's entry into a "mod- new administration.
SUPPOSED WIFE TELLS OF
COLD BLOODED MURDER.
By'lii rw".l
Atlanta, March 19 Eula Putnam,
alleged to be the woman known as the
wife of Homer Thompson, who is
sought in connection with the murder'
of Ernest Brown, the young DeKalb
couni farmer, Tuesday, is said to
have admitted. that 'Thompson killed
Rrown without provocation, in
a statement to Sheriff McCurdy shor
tly after her arrest last night.
She is also said to have stated that
she and Thompson were not legally
married. Thompson has not been arrested.
bnoj talk on the relation which a
good school bears to a community.
Mr. lassels told of the trials and trib-
ulatlns which a principal must un
derJ while a school buildintr is in
procls of erection and of the handi-cap-Avhich
he had met while trying
to 1 uh "in the old school buildings.
He ated that economically, good
sch s bear a greater relation, a
mor vital relation to evcrv interest
(exoit one) than any other institu
tional a community; that they are
the reatest assets in a community
froi a moral, material, dollars and
cenj and a health standpoint. Sta
tists were quoted ot prove that the
devopmentx which a community,
to or. state makes is directly pro
poronal to the money spent on
schls. Mr. Cassels concluded with
thejtatement that money put into
edution is not spent, but invested.
Te Rotarians were well represent
ed H. M. Fearnside who, in his ad
dre on the "Relation of the Rotary
to lild Welfare Work," clearly de
fim the purpose of the organization
of e International Rotary Club and
gaa short history of it. It is al
mo incbnceiveable that any club,
orisftting with four members in
190as did the Rotary, should have
gra as it has in this country and
sprl to Europe and Asia. Mr.
Feieide in enumerating its two
parount principles-- stressed the
f achat the good work of Rotary
warot confined to members alone,
butat many men live up to the
spiiof Rotary. This address was
typl f the spirit of Rotary, pro
grere, inspiring, and instructive.
Wh Palatka Public Schools Began
Bpning with the little red barn
whdPalatka's first public instruc
tions ,given, F. X. Wattles review
ed ihistory of -public school work
in Hka down to date. Mr. Wattles
told! the two underpaid, underfed
teaiB which the board furnished
in (early days to teach the two
gra in the first school, of the strug
gles former school boards and
tcacs to meet the needs and diffi
cult of public education here and
prai those who were responsible
forsj, final triumph in which all
thespoo .Have been met and diffi
cult 3V Aiiounted. Any one who
headr.' Wattles reminiscently re
call se early days would have
thou that he was an old man had
thet'I-nown otherwise.
"X dn of the Future" was the
topitichTiairman Joe Haughton
Continued on Paga .)
CONFESSES TO
SLAVING HIS
"DOUBLE" FOR
HSiANCE
EIGHTEEN - YEAR - OLD BOY
GIVES CONFIDENCE TO
SHERIFF'S WIFE
ASSUMES SOLE
RESPONSIBILITY
First Killed Chum, Who Looked Like
Him, Then Put Body in Buggy
' on Tracks
Warsaw, Ind., March 19 Vir
gil Decker early today solved the
mystery of the strange murder
of his chum, Leroy Lovett, by
confessing to slaying the youth
in a shack on the T ppecanoe riv
er lasts Saturday night.
Decker, an eighteen year old farm
er boy, told how he killed his friend
in order to collect $28,000 accident
insurance. Decker and Lovett had
many marks of s milarity in ap
pearance. ;
After Hitting Lovett in the head
with a heavy iron, Decker safd he
changed clothes with his victim;
placing the body in a buggy and left
the buggy standing on a railroad
track so that it might be struck by a
train.
Brother Would Collect.
Decker said he- thought the body
would be badly mutilated by the train
He planned to disappear and have
he body identified by his family as
that of himself. His brother would
collect the accident insurance, ac
cording to the' scheme and then he
would obtain1 it from him.
Becker said he alone planned the
murder and there was no conspiracy
with any member of his family of any
mysterious character known as "Guy'
mentioned in his earlier stories.
The confession was obtained by the
motherly Mrs. C. 'B. Moon, wife of
the sheriff of Koskisco county, after
grilling by officials had failed to
bring forth the story.
Mrs. Moon treated the boy kindly
and won his confidence.
11
I
OF
S" TO
LIFT
T01HAI
'VOTES FOR SQUAWS" TO
SQUAWK OF PRINCESS
WHITE DEER
BE
WARRIORS TOO
LAZY TO FIGHT
But Women Will Go After Pallot and
Enter Activity Into National
Politics
By Paul R. Mallon.
VnlttMl Prei Staff CrreHfinlpnt
New York, March 19 A Susan B.
Anthony of the American Indians
took up the tomahawk to fight for
"votes for squaws" today.
Princess White Deer, full blooded
Mohawk Indian, interpretative danc
er and Broadway star, declared there
will be real red faction at the r.ext
presidential election, if the hopes of
squaws are fulfilled. The princess is
the only genuine Indian on the "great
white way."
If the Indian wa.iltr is content to
smoke his pipe of rcace in front of a
refervafiin wigwam, the Indian wo
man i3 not and she will fight her
way to the polls I eside her pale fac
ed sister.
"The only impertinent that hangs
between the squaw riid the ballot is
fear of heavy tavntJon" the princess
said in an interview with the United
Press. ''The Indian cculd have ob
tained the privilege long ago if it
had -not bee for fear of losing his
land all he has lef tr t. We believe
the iron is now hot, and we are ready
to strike.
"The Indian has been tossed about
as a political football. He has little
spirit left. But the Indian woman is
theworker who will salvage the hulk
of red skin misfortune and win the
voting right.
"This, I believe would arouse the
Indian spirit and make him an eco
nomic warrior to rival his fighting
ancestors."
Appointment of a red skin Indian
commissioner which has been sought
in Washington is the first" step, she
,said;
Princess White Deer is a blood de
scendant of Chief Running Deer,
leader of the Mohawks in the French
and Indian war.
REI
COL
DEPi
so:
KING GEORGE IS
FOR CARPENTIER
AGAINST DEMPSEY
(By irnlt'd rroa.)
Liverpool, Mar. 19 Before King
George, Queen Mary, the Prince of
Wales and many other notables,
Carpentier showed last night how he
knocked out Battling Levinsky.
The performance in which Jules Le-
naers, his sparring partner, was used
as Levinsky, followed three exhibi
tion rounds at the big estate of Lord
Derby.
After Carpentier gnocked out "Le
vinsky" King George entered the ring
and shook hands with the Frenchman
wishing him the best of luck when he ' slnKlnE'
meets Jack Dempsey this summer.
BIG COMivlUNITY
AT MELLON
L
SUNDAY
STILLMAN MAY HAVE TO
RESIGN BANK PRESIDENCY
(Ilr l ulled Freu.)
New York, March 19 Attorneys
for James A. Stillman were reported
today to have obtained a stay of pro
ceedings in Mrs. Stillman's motion
for increased alimony and counsel
fees, pending trial of the multi-millionaire's
suit.
This action. was taken in an effort
to prevent Stillman being forced into
court to testify regarding his finan
cial condition. The impression is
growing in financial circles today that
Stllman soon will be forced to resign
the presidency ef the National City
Bank, which carries with it a salary
of 100,000 per year.
Palatka is to unite in a Sunday af
ternoon sing tomorrow. Community
Service has obtained the use of the
auditorium of the Mellon School for
the purpose, and has made other ar
rangements. The singing will begin
at 4 o'clock under the direction of
Emeison Stone. The committee in
charge states that the program will
be in keeping with the spirit of the
Sabbath. There will be special solo
numbers to feature the program of
community singing. All people of the
city are invited to take part in the
No charge of admission
will be made. The music .committee j
of Palatka Community Service, which
is in charge of the affair, points out
the fact that the meeting has been
arranged for no other purpose than
to afford the people of the city an op
portunity to enjoy beautiful mass
singing. 1
Hundreds of cities in the United
States today have taken on commun
ity music programs. City-wide sings
such as will be held in the high school
auditorium tomorrow afternoon, have
in such places become one of the most
beautiful and popular of the com
munity program. Community music,
Mr. Stone stated yesterday, does not
end with mass singing. Out of the
singing win certainly grow a com-
MUST HM ,
- ties'-
FINANC
URGI
: c
Even in M-Jdl
tualfy Be
crea'cf:
''5.'.
-By
lfd Prr'
sentajivep
' terests v
Herbert W
merce, W-J
the fart.
own., 'M
knowledgl
ing and I
ed theN a
despefatel
trans port 4
imper'iled
food prod
These'.meh
of foreign v,J
er products
producing
Leaders S6 f
ing industrj
sands of rt
ranges if tm
by foreign' ()
nieatit a W
mad .mila
somf ?jfM,
this happened
nani'e mights h
ersand sheej ;
liohs of dollar,
vuations mnch 1:
tley could now
thV -redit of tia
anc,6utW,t is
fraJle f
v if, tm- - t
iuuu p vl
er prif es,
ranch lhands to
of towfhs and t .
Hoover ane s
of the Unitefl Si
merce today i.
President Har ,
eration. Th'esi
1. An emb
of wool, mea ,
other produc .
proclaim thi 1
act, still in f,
2. Immedi.ue
islation. ' -
3. Anti-d ,-
followed by pi
tariff bilL
At the saiin
forts to exfy. '
an credits u
corporation,
million dollar
ganized by ,
eign trade
law banks. 4
Hoover re -
as a necessity
States, jwliik
consumption, s
for South A
Australian m
They do not
credit and "
States becau.
one cabinet j
est exchai J
1'"
a band anuLLLli
the exper a.v p,o:
The lar t n M.
will be ffic ' ent:
in chares n h3t 1
honed to ked
manity chorus, he said, and out ofl munity sir 't P
ths chorus will in all probability grow I of Pala"4lany
l I 1 Awhr
J T

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