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Palatka daily news. [volume] (Palatka, Fla.) 1919-1994, June 01, 1921, Image 6

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Palatlm Hally feraa
Wednesday Morning, June I, lQ2i
PAGE 6
Ecldy Refrigerators and Ice Boxes
THE FATHER OF THEM ALL
1847
1921
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Ask For Demonstration
A reputation as a leader for three quarters of a century is not a thing to be lightly sac
rificed and every effort has been bent during that time to keep the EDDY in the fore
front. You can pay more rtioney for a Refrigerator, but you cannot get a better one
regardless of the price.
Then Why Pay More? . ,
We demonstrate any Refrigerator in your home free of charge. We guarantee to
save 50 per cent in your ice bill.
Note the Double Door
Easy Payments
Easy Payments
FUST OUTFIT OF
PLAYERS COMING
F
Jack DcLysle, captain of the Fort
Myers baseball team is bringing with
him this afternoon a string of first
class ball players to' pit against the
locals and for the next three days Pa
latkans will be able to see some real
baseball games.
Fort Myers comes to Palatka with
a record of having lost only three
games out of seventeen played. And
two of these defeats were by two of
the strongest teams in the state out
side of organized baseball; the Tampa
Cuban Giants and the Lakeland teams.
Captain DcLysle says of his team:
"We have a splendid team, the men
being all gentlemen. Four or five of
them will bring their wives with
them and there will be undoubtedly
ten or fifteen cars accompanying the
team from here."
Some of the members of this team
and last year manager of the Orlando
are: Donnelly, formerly of Lakeland
team, catcher; Monk, last year with
the Saint Louis Cardinals; Elrod,
formerly pitcher for Lakeland; Blount,
Davis and Rogers, also pitchers; Row-
lie Creiger, son of famous Lou Crei
ger, catcher for the Pittsburgh team,
first base for Lakeland last year;
Lightfoot, formerly with the Wyom
ing League, second base; Usher of
the Georgia State League, short stop;
Herrocks of the Lakeland team, third
base; Joe Rogers, left field for Lake
land last year; Moger, center field;
Stone, Stroup, and Montgomery,
fielders.
Captain Barstow will pitch for the
locals this afternoon' There will be
several other changes in the line-up
of the locals. Villarino will be back at
his old position on short and Jack
son will be at the third sack. Hogan,
a new man who is well Tecommended
to the management, will appear in
uiform for the first time and will
probably play one of the outfield positions.
INTER-CHURCH
SOCIAL A BIG
EVENING'S FUN
The second inter-church social
given under the auspices of the Pa
latka Community Service was held
last night at the Woman's Club. A
large and enthusiastic crowd took ad
vantage of this opportunity to sing
and play the old' fashioned social and
recreative games that mean so much
to the health and well being of all.
The program was planned and di
rected by the Philatheas of the Pres
byterian church with Mrs. C. E. 0'
Conner chairman of the committee.
She was ably assisted by Mrs. J. H.
Millican and Fred Merrill. The enter
tainment was opened by singing, but
until the Baptist Philatheas marched
in in a body. Each was tagged with
a card designating their class. The
singing was led by Neegly Teeters and
Charles Bennett. Mrs. E. L. Mann
accompanied on the piano. The fea
ture of the singing was a number of
the old rounds, among which were,
"Scotland's Burning," and "Three
Blind Mice". A number of circle and
folk games were then played all of
which caused much amusement.
During the intermission the guests
were entertained with two very charm
ing solos rendered by Mrs- Frank
Logan, accompanied by Mrs. R. S.
O'Haver.
The evening closed with that fam
ous old nursery game that has gain
ed so much favor at these socials,
"Leeby Lee"- Dixie was then sung
and the guests disbanded after giving
a rousing cheer for the Presbyterian
Philatheas whose social all agreed
was a hugh success. Announcement
was made of the next church socal
that is to be held in two weeks with
the Methodists in charge.
POISON PAPERS
OF
FORMER AMERICAN EDITOR
MAYOR OF POLISH CITY
TAMPA WOMAN'S
DEATH MYSTERY
Ily ANm-liit'l lri'n)
Tampa, May 31. The coroner's
jury which considered the death of I
Mrs. Aurora Hernades, an aged white!
woman whose body was found lying at!
the edge of a pond about sixteen
miles north of the city ten days ago
today rendered a verdict that the
cause of her death was unknown. The
woman had wandered away from her
son's home in this city at night, he
stated. When found, the body was
clad only in a night robe. How the
woman could pass through the city
in such garb and through a thickly
settled rural district and not be
noticed is a mystery.
Hoboken, May 31 A serious fire
was reported tonight on the S. S.
George Washington, which twice car
ried President Wilson to the Paris
peace conference. The steamer is
moored at a shipyard here.
666cures Malaria, Chills and Fev
er, Bilious Fever, Colds and La
Grippe, or money refunded.
Don't forget we clean Palm Beach
Suits the way they should be cleaned
for 75c
GEM CITY PRESSING CLUB
Next to Jamei Hotel
Illy AHHoi-lated PrewO
Detroit, Mich, May 31. Dr. Bol
eslaw M. Zielinski, former Detroit
Newspaper man who returned to Po
land 12 months ago after a 12 years
residence here, has been made mayor
of Thorn, a Polish city on the German
frontier, according to word received
by friends here.
The city of Thorn is situated on the
bank of the Vistula river, which di
vides into two branches at that point.
It formerly was a part of the German
empire but came under the Polish
flag when the Prussian Poland be
came part of the Polish republic. It
has a population of about 30,000.
According to word from Thorn, Dr.
Zielinski was made mayor in recog
nition of his work of relief during
the bolsheviki invasion.
While in Detroit, Dr. Zielinski
served as editor of two Polish news:
papers.
POLK VOTES $200,000 FOR
BONDS TO RELIEVE SCHOOLS
Illy AfttMM'latrd Frew)
Lakeland, May 31. The $200,000
bond issue was carried today by a
large majority and the county will
ask the legislature to validate the is-
sue at once so that the much needed
school facilities can be had for the
fall.
INTERMEDIATE BASEBALL
The Convent baseball team meets
the Presbyterian team today at two
o'clock on the north end lot. All play
ers are urged to report on the field
on time. Wattles and Martin for the
Presbyterians and Shelley and Cau
sey for the Catholics make up the
batteries. An interesting game is
promised. Two o'clock on the north
lot
!ILS
(By AMHorlateil PreM)
Washington, May 31. Postal pro
hibitions against the Milwaukee Lead
er and New York Call, two socialist
newspapers, were withdrawn today by
Postmaster General Hayes, who re
stored them to second class mailing
privileges. The action was in line
wit hthat recently taken in the case
of the Liberator, a periodical pub
lished in New York City-
Orders cancelling the second class
mail privileges of the publication were
issued by Postmaster General Burle
son late in 1917, after an inquiry in
which Mr. Burleson said had shown
that through articles published each
had violated provisions of the espion
age act.
The Liberator successor to the
Masses, ceased publication soon af
terwards, the publishers announcing
they were unable to bear the addi
tional burden imposed by the third
class rate. Both the Leader and the
Call carried their fight to the courts.
The Milwaukee paper, upon refusal
of the supreme court of the District
of Columbia to issue a writ of man
damus to compel the postmaster gen
eral to restore the cancelled privi
leges, applied to to the supreme court
of the United States where the lower
court was upheld.
H. P. FERRISS
DROPS DEAD IN
MIAMI OFFICE
( IIt Auorlnted PreM)
Miami, May 31. H. P. Ferriss,
collocetor of the port of Miami, drop
ped dead in his office in the federal
building this afternoon, heart failure
being the cause of the death. He was
a republican but held office through
the Wilson administratio-n
Baseball Results.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
At Philadelphia, 3-4; Boston, 5-8.
At Cincinnati, 7; St. Louis, 8.
At Detroit, 4; Cleveland, 712 in.
At Washington, 12; New York, 5.
j of the peasat smuggler who agreed
to get us into Latvia for the price of
my shoes and Lieutenant Sokoloski's
overcoat.
"The entire family sleeps on these
ovens during the winter and beneath
there is generally a space for a few
pigs or calves. We were up thero for
twenty-four hours and the lieutenant
slept most of the time and kept me
busy holding his nose to stifl'.e his
snores when the family was receiving
Red soldier callers.
Lenine Most Popular
"My information about Russia was
gathered from the influx and out
flow of the prisoners in the various
prison camps where I was stationed
and also from the peasants whom I
met during the winter when I worked
on railroads entering Moscow and
during my escape.
"Lenine is still the most popular
man in Russia today and his personal
following far outnumbers Trotsky- He
is idolized and his pictures are found
in every conceivable place. Other pic
tures and posters bear quotations from
his speeches which are accepted by
the peasants 'like the gospel', as the
negroes say in Florida."
According to Captain Cooper travel
ers in Russia today will see two pic
tures of Lenine to every one of Trot
sky. A favorite poster is one depict
ing Karl Marx in the center and
flanked with two smaller pictures of
the Russian leaders. Trotsky, Cooper
declares, has not the confidence of the
masses of the people that Lenine has,
and many persons expressed the opin
ion that the biggest single factor hold
ing the Russian government today is
Lenine's personal prestige.
"The propaganda section is another
of the few efficient branches of the
government. There is scarcely a per
son with whom I talked in Russia who
is not more or less affected by this
propaganda. At the present time
among the workers and the peasants
there is a bitter hatred against the En
tente. Wherever I have ibeen the Allies
are pictured on posters as being the
real causes of the present misery in
Russia. j
"However, the feeling toward Amer-!
ica is even friendly. I
"Many Communists told me thatj
they regard a revolution in the United:
States as a remote possibility andj
that they think our country must'
change to Communism by a general
process of evolution. '
NATIONAL LEAGUE
At Boston, 2; Brooklyn, 4.
At New York, 5; Philadelphia, 10.
At Cincinnati, 6; St. Louis, 5.
At Pittsburgh, 6; Cleveland, 7
12 innings.
SOUTHERN LEAGUE
At Little Rock, 3; Birmingham, 3
called-
At Chattanooga, 11; Atlanta, 10.
At Nashville, 8; Mobile, 7.
At Memphis, 6; New Orleans, 7.
FLORIDA STATE LEAGUE
At St. Petersburg, 6; Orlando, 6.
At Tampa, 6; Daytona, 5.
At Jacksonville, 2; Lakeland, 1,
MERIAN COOPER TELLS STORY
(Continued from Page 1.)
and with this we finished the trip.
"The most exciting moment came
about three days out of Moscow while
we were waiting by the railroad for
a freight to pass. Two guards came
alog and we had to lie in a ditch full
of icy water for two hours while
they talked of the probability of a
trade. Another time that I was scared
was when we were lying on top of one
of the big heating ovens in the home
"There are no laws in Russia to
day, and the Government is enforced
by decrees. And the decrees are en
forced by the Revolutionary con
science' of the Communist party. As
for the party, it is the real aristocracy
of Russia today and it is one of the
most exclusive organizations' which
have ever been organized in Russia.
"The party is not composed of work
ing people, for whenever a working
man is admitted he either takes a po
litical or a military job- The party
members distinguish themselves from
the rest of the population by either
wearing a badge with 'the Communist
emblem embroidered or a revolver on a
Sam Brown belt. As members of the
party are the only persons in Russia
permitted to wear revolvers the Com
munists . are "rather a distinguished
crowd.
"The party is one of the best dis-j
ciplined organizations in the world, for!
there is seldom but one punishment;
for all offenses. That is death. There i
are very few Russian Communists in1
prison in Russia today. And any per-,
son of influence in Russia today is
a Communist." j
When asked what his next move;
was going to be Captain Cooper con-!
fided that he was going to Poland to:
get his discharge and then he was
going home to Florida to become an
epicure.
JOHN J. MURPHY
Real Estate
STOP AT THE )'it
PUTNAM HOUSE !
OPEN ALL THE YEAR
Rates $1.00 Per day and up. i
ATLANTIC HOTEL-
JACKSONVILLE
FLORIDA
All outside rooms with hot and coU
water. All steam heated. Rates
$1.50 to $2.50. Bath, $2.00 to $3.0. '
Very Center of Everything 5 -"
B. FRANK PEARCE. Prop, and M$r 1
CHICHESTER S PILLS
ifTV THE UlAJIVrlV Uiunil, Jk f) 1
DBA Nik.
Ladlesl AkyarlrMfstfor-
ni.cn f-ier manorial vrmiL
Fill In Ked and Void metallic1
boxes, sealed with Blttc Ribbon
Take mthrr. Bur m,t vash
DIAMllNtl It BAND PII.I J
Take tbcr. Bur T
ywr known M Bert, SiftJt Aiwa TiKtJkbVt
SOLD BY DRUGGISTS EVERYWHERE '
Attractive Mid-Summer Millinery
At Attractive Prices
Let us make you an Organdy Hat
Pretty ones at $6.00 each
Hemstitching and Picoting "
Cotton 10c; Silk 12 l-2c yard
MRS. TILLMAN
Baseball Today
PALATKA
vs.
F OR T MYERS
Game Called at 4:15 p. m.
The visitors bring which is claimed to be the fastest
organization in the state. , Lets see!
Championship of State Now the Goal!
X
1.. 1--J-.1

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