OCR Interpretation


Palatka daily news. [volume] (Palatka, Fla.) 1919-1994, June 17, 1921, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Florida

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78001466/1921-06-17/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

mmH I, -1 i-r -i ji - . wr"1"1 in"
1
'''''
GOOD
MORNING
He who fears being
conquered is sure of
defeat. Napoleon.
mm
6 PAGES
TODAY
-"V
I
VOL. II. NO. 212.
PALATE A, FLORIDA, FRIDAY MORNING, JUNE 17, 1921 1921.
PRICE FIVE CENTS
- v :; n... . V-:. ,5.-y 4Af;; , y,; ; v .-.--J ..
. : ' v :z ' s : .v. ; ' y. y
utkm
48
WORLD'S TITLE
BE
III JERSEY
Selection of Referee Is
Cause Serious Rift
In Arrangements
RICXARD ASKS DELAY
Dempsey Understood to
. Have Objected to
Ertle
(By Aaanelated Preaa)
Hackensack, N. J A threat that
there would be no Dempsey-Car-
'pentier fight in Jersey City on July
2 if the New Jersey boxing commis
sion could not (have the privelege of
naming the referee 'was made to-
night by Commissioner Doherty at
a dinner t Charles J. Lyons, another
member of the commission.
Mr. Doherty said a serious situa
tion had arisen as a "certain party'
believed he should have the privilege
of naming the referee. No names
were mentioned. '
Kick Came From Dempsey
(llj Aaaoclnted I'reM)
Nek York, June 16. Controversy
"is expected before a referee is named
.by the New Jersey Boxing commis
sion for the Dempsey-Carpentier fight.
It had been expected selection
would be made at a meeting of the
commission today, but after adjourn
ment it was announced had been
indefinitely postponed at the request
of promoter Tex Rickard. While no
one would discuss the matter it was
understood a sharp difference of opin
ion had developed among those with
interest at stake. Y 5 .,
. According to? generalreports J.
Harry Ertle, one of the regular New
Jersey referees, had been tentatively
selected with three other New Jer
sey referees as alternates, but oppo
sition developed from Dempsey's
camp because the commission had
ignored candidates named in the ori
ginal contract signed by Dempsey and
Carpentier.
The matter was reported to have
bee,n referred to Rickard with the
request that he try to effect a com
promise. It was learned, unofficially, that the
commission would stand on its rights
under the state 'boxing law which
empowers it to name and license all
referees.
No objection from Carpentier's
camp has been raised against the
naming of the referee.
OIL BURNING SHIPS A
PERIL TOHSH SUPPLY
(Br AModatrd PreiMk
Washington, June 16. Measures
to safeguard the fish industry of the
eastern seaboard were discussed today
at a conference of state authorities
from the Atlantic coast and fisher
men with Secretary Hoover.
The meeting was called, it was ex-
plained, to consider the problems of
pollution of the waters of the Atlan
tic and control of migratory fish.
It developed at the conference, Mr.
Hoover said, that billions of dollars
worth of fish had been lost during
the last twenty years through pol
lution of the waters as a result of the
use of oil as fuel by ships.
JUDGE CALL ORDERS LOT
OF SEIZED BOOZE RETURNED
(Hr Aclld Preiwt
Jacksonville, June 16. Failure of
federal officers to have a proper war
rant when they seized a quantity of
intoxicants in the residence of D. R.
Armstrong, at Miami, recently has
resulted in Armstrong having his li
quor returned to him by order of Fed
eral Judge Call. Papers in the case
show that the officer seize! the fol
lowing: Twenty-nine cases of cognic, 8
cases of Canadian Club whiskey, 2
cases of Colon whiskey, 12 cases of
Gibley gin; 10 cases of Bacardi rum;
2 eases of Strathmall Scotch whiskey
and It eases of Geneva gin.
MAY
2
CITY'S ARENA
E
ALSO JMISED
Patients and Nurses Too
Friendly Says An
Investigator
Great Progress Made In
Face of Many
Obstacles
'.By AanoplHletl PreM)
New Ybrk, June 1 16. Conditions
in the government hospitals for the
care' of tuberculous soldiers, sailors,
marines and nurses were both com
mended and criticized in today's ses
sion of the annual meeting of the Na
tional Tuberculosis Association here.
The comments both favorable and
otherwise were made in a report pre
sented by two of the five physicians
selected by the surgeon-general of
the United States Public Health Ser
vice to visit and inspect the hospi
tals for tuberculous service men.
It is drawn up by Dr. George T,
Palmer, of Springfield, 111., and Dr.
Henry W. Hoagland, of La Jolla, Cal,
The physicians reported "that ' they
were surprised to find that the insti
tutions were so efficintly conducted
in the face of difficulties and obsta
cles that had to be overcome. They
commended the attitude of the surgeon-general
in seeking to improve
the service and readiness to act upon
constructive criticism.
The chief criticisms of the govern
ment hospitals made by the two phy
sicians were:
"Shortage of medical personnel, es
pecially trained in the diagnosis and
treatment of tuberculosis.
Too Much Vamping by Nurses
"Shortage of specially trained nurs
es and the lowering of the moral
through tha social retatiqjnsthip of
nurses and other female employes
with patit.
"Lack of discipline indicated in the
prevalence of gambling, the use of
tobacco, the abuse of leaves and fur
loughs and the participation of pa
tients in harmful diversions and am
usements. "The assignment of the more com
petent members of the medical staff
to wards for terminal and advanced
patients with less efficient medical
service in the wards occupied by the
doubtful cases and by patients await
ing discharge."
The physicians pointed out that
there was great difficulty in recruit
ing medical staffs for tuberculosis
sanatoriams because of the neglect
or tuDercuiosis oy medical scnoois in
the past and because 'of the greatly
increased demand for physicians with
tuberculous training.
On the whole the physicians stated
that they believed that the United
Sates Public Health Servile was en
titled to general commendation for
the degree of efficiency attained un
der the conditions prevailing in the
establishment of these institutions.
"During the next 20 years," the
physicians stated, "but two great me
dical problems will remain as the af
termath of the war. One of these
is that of dealing with mental and
nervous cases and the other is the
tuberculous problem."
They asserted that the peak of the
incidence of tuberlosis resulting from
the war has not been reached nor
will it be for a number of years to
come. They predicted that if the fed
eral government met the problem of
tuberculous soldier efficiently and at
the same time utilized its opportuni
ties for the bnefit of the civil popu
lation there would come, as an indi
rect result of the war, an awakening
SECRETARY LANE
ASSAULTED AND
R0BBED0F $275
Negroes At Quincy' Got
Him Into a Dark
Alley y;
FACE IS BADLY SLASHED
Also Was Struck on Head
With a Blunt f
Weapon
Br AlMociated Trrw)
Quincy, Fla., June 16.-Authori-tics
tonight were searching for two
negroes who early today held up 6.
B. Lane, recording secretary of the
State Board of Teachers Examiners
ana roDDea mm oi fi io.
Mr. Lane sustained a severe' blow
on the head and a knife cut across
the face.
Mr. Lane, who is here conducting
examinations of school teachers, left
his hotel about three o'clock 51 this
morning to mail a letter at the post
office. As he was returning he heard
groans eminating from a dark alley.
Upon investigation he found a negro
lying prone as in deep distress. Short
ly he heard footsteps behind hira,and
when he turned the negro rose sud
denly to his feet and slashed him
with a knife. At the same time "the
other negro coming into the alley hit
him with a blunt instrument.
Mr. Lane lay unconscious for 5 an
hour before he was removed to his
hotel for treatment.
MEXICAN SOLDIER QUIT V
Mexico City, June 16. The busi
ness of making a living by fighting
seems to have undergone a decline in
Mexico. This is indicated by tho fswt
that l)2p0SoWijBJs9jfla.j)f tbcmjyj articles .from the office and establish
tired and serine active service," have ecfa gSar3TiarBl Vt'Hasi'yP-
asked the government for tracts of
land for small farming.
SENATE TURNS DOWN
PACKER RESOLUTION
MEASURE BY 37 TO 34
Senator Sterling Puts In
New Measure With
Manifestation
Washington, June 16. By a vote
of 37 to 34 the senate today rejected
the packer regulation bill recom
mended by the agricultural com
mittee and then adjourned until to
morrow with the regulatory bill re
cently passed by the house and a new
measure submitted by Senators
Sterling, republican of South Dakota,
pending before it.
The defeat of the agriculture bill,
generally described as more drastic
than the house measure, and intro
duction of a new bill by Senator
Sterling threw the packer regulation
forces into momentary confusion. A
resolution to adjourn out of respect
for PJbpreserttative Mason, of Illi
nois, who died earlier in the day,
thereupon was approved without dis
sent.
Leaders in the fight for strict regu
lation of the packing industry held
a conference immediately on ad
journment and decided to request to
morrow a reconsideration.
Failing to put the bill through to
morrow the packer regulation lead
ers will attempt to obtain passage
of the new Sterling bill which pre
scribes much the same restrictions
for the packing business as the ag
ricultural committee bill, but would
lodge the administration m the fed
eral trade commission instead of in
a live stock commissioner, as pro
vided in the latter measure. Should
the Sterling bill fail the house bill
would then be before the senate.
WEATHER FORECAST
Partly cloudy Friday and Sat-
urday; probably light scattered
showers in soutnern portion
to the importance and magnitude of
the tuberculous problem which will
prove of tremendous and lasting bene
fit to the nation.
FLORIDA CITIES
LEAD IN POSTAL
SAVJNLtS DEPOSITS
Pensacola Is Ahead of
All Other Southern
Cities
I
Tampa and Jacksonville
Also Show Big
Deposits
(Br Auoclnteil Preiw)
Washington, June 16. Pensacola,
Fla., leads all southern cities in to
tal deposits in the United States
Postal Savings system on May 31,
while Miami, Fla., had a larger gain
during May than any southern city
had, the third largest gain among
the 135 postal savings depositories
having more than $100,000 on deposit,
according to announcement today by
Post Master General Haynes.
Of the 135 postal savings deposi
tories, which had a total of $155,-
500,000 on May 31, Pensacola, first
city of the southern states, stood 51st
on the list with $287,949. Other sou
them cities included Jacksonville,
$173,484; Tampa, $141,841, and Mi
ami, $111,794.
FORMER MARSHAL HELD ON
CHARGE OF ROBBING MAILS
(Br Amoclntcd I'reHB)
Carrabelle, June 16. E. J. Hogan,
a former marshal, is being held en
a charge of rifling the mails as a re
sult of his arrest Saturday night by
persons who were watching the post
office at Sophhoppy. Postmaster Bec-
ton,.at Sopshoppy, had been missing
was caught in the act of opening par
eel post packages,
SEIZED ONJOARO SHIP
Williams Also Wants to
Know Who Took them
' From Warehouse
(By Aftaoclatcd PreMNl
New York, June 16. Ownership
of the 494 machine guns and the
hundreds of spare parts seized yes
terday by customs officials after they
were found secreted on the steamship
Eastside, and presumed to have been
destined for Ireland, is still the sub
ject of investigation by government
officials. The guns, through a federal
warrant of detention, were restored
today to customs officials from whom
they were taken on a search and sei
zure warrant by the Hoboken police.
A hearing set for today 'was
tended to bring out the story of how
they came to be on board the ship and
to establish the claim of Frank Wil
liams that they were stolen from his
warehouse, but the hearing was de
clared off after tnc federal writ had
been served.
Federal agents are working on
several angles of the case including
an attempt to trace the guns from
the factory in which they were manu
factured. Mr. Williams, through his attorney,
also is conducting an investigation
to determine the identity of the per
sons who he claims stole the guns
from his warehouse.
Advices from Hartford, Conn.,
where the arms were manufactured,
said they were made for the Auto
Ordnance Co., of New York, and
shipped in the usual way. At the of
fices of that company here knowledge
of their sale to Frank Williams was
disclaimed. The type of' gun seized,
an official of the1 company said, is
known- as the Thompson sub-machine
gun, and is sold through jobbers in
large lots. If Williams actually owned
the guns, the official declared, he must
have bought them through such job
bers in small lots.
FEDERATION CONVENTION
IN TUiOIL OVER KUKLUX
RESOLUTION BY NEGROES
WITNESSES RELATE
INTIMATE LIFE OE
.A.
Maids Tell of Conduct
With Beauvais in
"Blue Cottage"
HAD LETTERS FROM FRED
Also Saw Inscriptions
in Moccasins Given
Little Guy
By Auoclatrd Preaa)
Poughkeepsie, N. Y.( June 16
-At-
tempts to prove misconduct by Mrs.
Ann U. Stillman in her relations with
her servant arid part Indian guide,
Fred Beuvais, were made today in
the divorce case instituted by James
A. Stillman, New York banker and
multi-millionaire.
Irene Kelly, a parlor maid, fre
quently saw Beauvais at the Potanico
Hills estate standing beside Mrs.
Sitllman's bed playing the phono
graph . and reading to the banker's
wife, according to a report of her
testimony.
Mary Kelly, a maid, declared Mrs.
Stillman sometimes used to wear a
tHuiillii4and with the initials ",'F.
engravea on 4ne msimvyi ?m
said. Asked whether she had
ever
noticed her mistress with a wedding
ring on her finger the maid replied
that Mrs. Stillman's wedding ring
always had reposed in a jewel box
on her bureau.
During her testimony, it was said
she told of having seen Beauvais'
handwriting, not only on letters but
within the moccasins worn by Guy
Stillman, the infant who Mr. Still
man charges is the son of Beauvais
Inscribed within one moccasin, it was
said she testified: "I hope Guy will
always be good to his mother," and
in the other, "I hope Guy will some
day know his father."
Margaret McDefough, the nurse of
Alexander Stillman, a young boy, tes
tified it was asserted, that on one
occasion in 1919 Mrs. Stillman, Al
exander and a.TIiss Fegan dwelt in
the upper stof f the "blue cottage"
while Guy and his nurse slept below.
Early one morning, Miss McDefough
said, according to report of her tes
timony, was passing the bath room
upstairs and saw Mrs. Stillman come
out of the door in her kimona and
enter her own room. The nurse fol
lowed and noticed that Mrs. Still
man's bed appeared not to have been
slept in during the night. Then it
in-lwas sajd she testified, she walked
down the corridor, looked into the
adjoining room, which had been oc
cupied by Beauvais, and observed that
the bed had been slept in.
Irene Kelly, it was assertained, had
looked in Mrs. Stillman's handbag
and seen two letters which she tes
tified bore the handwriting of Beau
vais. She read them but could not
recollect their contents.
DYNAMITER BLEW IP
GARAGE AT PAI.M BEACH
(By Aaaoplatril lnNa
Miami, J no 3 6. The police are con
tinuing their investigation of a mys
terious explosion in a garage at the
rear of a negro undertaking estab
lishment several nights ago. The ex
plosion, which the police attributed
to dynamite, wrecked a touring car,
smashed rougTi boxes that had con
tained caskets, blew out a part of the
building, demolished the glass sides
of a hearse and tore .shingles from
the roof of a nearby house. The po
lice believe an enemy from the roof
of the undertaker was responsible.
It is believed the dynamite was
placed under the hood of the touring
car as the motor was blown to bits.
Only a part of the body of fye ma
chine can be salvaged.
Resolution Not Permit
ted to be Put to a
Vote
WANTS KLAN DISSOLVED
Man Who Blocked Reso
lution Not Ashamed to
Be Known
(Br AiwoclatMl Presa)
Denver, June 16. The American
Federation of Labor today unani
mously repudiated the "one big
union idea."
Without discussion on the 41st
annual convention of the federation
sustation the action of its committee
on organization in non-concurring,
on the resolution calling for "one
body of workers through amalgama
tions, federations and protective
agreements."
The convention was thrown into
confusion when several delegates,
by objections, defied the negro dele
gation permission to introduce a re
solution condemning the "mob vio
lence" of the "klu klux klan or white
caps" of the south.
President Sam Gompers had great
difficulty in restoring order as nearly
a score of delegates jumped from
their seats and demanded the names
of the delegates who had objected.
He declined to give the names.
Hutchinson Accepts Credit
As the confusion increased William
UuUihi-Hr1hSthe United
Brotherhood of CaTpentew arid" Join
ers, arose and said: "If you want to
know who the objector it it is I".
Several delegates called his name
aloud as the convention proceeded,
to further business. The resolution
also provided that steps be taken to
have the governors "abolish this un
lawful organization known as the klu
klux klan or white caps" and that
the federation use its "best endeavors
to protect organized labor as repre
sented by the negro workers."
TO
(By Aaaoclated Teaa)
Grand Kapids, Mich., June 16. A
one day membership campaign will
be conducted by the American Legion
July 4, Major John G. Emory, new
commander of the organization an
nounced here today after his arrival
from Indianapolis.
"Legion members are going to bring
in one new member each on that day"
Major Emory announced. July 4 is
the birthday anniversary of the new
commander.
In a statement this afternoon re
garding plans for the future of the
legion, Major Emory declared the or
ganization "would provide, first, for
disabled men.
"And by that I mean those financi
ally disabled as well as physically
disabled," he said. "There are women
and little children, as well as needy
men, we must look after. The inno
cent remained at home during the
war. They suffered enough then with
out being made to suffer more.
"I shall take a decided stand in the
matter of immigration. For the sake
of our country's welfare I believe the
influx of immigrants should be stop
ped or at least permanently regulat
ed. SIXTH MAN ARRESTED IN
MARION'S ASSAULT CASE
(Br A-aaoclated Preaa)
Ocala, june 16. Harvey Waters
was arrested today charged with hav
ing been a member of the party
which two weeks ago assaulted J.
P. Milton, a farmer, at his home near
here, and ordered him to leave the
county. Waters is the sixth man to
be arrested in connection with the
case, five others having been taken
into custody yesterday. All are at
liberty on bo fids of $500 each.
1
7
I
J
1
'.t
e
ir
.h;
'mm
-,
ja
er
ha
roi
yr.
o
to
;e
:h
ib
!'!
ivi
k , : tK"
:.., .
i
)t
;er
''Y h:
' . . e
ire
. ) Y
. ng
w
cl
'"thr:
.ft
'let
. J
tr
nc
ng
; a
rac
ime
s it
1 ro
. ' 121
to E(
mmitt(
stati
ynchinf
D white
Hid in c
ver caup
. arrestee
lfe and
Athe ra(
1 inty.-
of
tec
tes
4!
: Am
I Va
He
J las
Id v
.
. Jten
!!
j:.
iurc
J re
n 1

xml | txt