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Palatka daily news. [volume] (Palatka, Fla.) 1919-1994, June 21, 1921, Image 1

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fALATKA, FLORIDA, TUESDAY MORNING, JUNE 21, 1921.
PRICE FIVE CENTh
VOL- II. NO. 215.,
Mllf ISH'FRIENDSHIP IS VOICED
4
LEWIS TO OPPOSE GOMPERS AS PRESIDENT
LJ
jOg palatkas iaig waters
GEORGE
FERVENT IN A
TALK BEFORE
ALL PREMIERS
Leaves No Doubt Where
Preference Is As ,
Toward Japan
Friendship With Ameri
ca Is a Cardinal
Principal
Br Aimoclated PrcM)
London, June 20. The British
prime minister, in opening the Im-
periojl Conference attended by the
premiers of the over-seas dominions,
today referred to Anglo-Japanese re
lations -in terms generally regarded
in American circles here as assu
rance to the United States that any
renewal of the agreement with the
i Japanese government would neces
sarily be of a nature unobjectionable
to America.
While Mr. Lloyd George avoided
a declaration on the direct issue of
the treaty he alluded to the war time
friendship with Japan and said that
Greatf-Britain was anxious to apply
this friendship to a solution of the
questions connected with the Pacific
ocean and the far east, among them
the future of China.
Great Britain desired . to avoid
competion in armaments in the Pa
cific, the prime minister declared,
and he emphasized the willingness of
the government to discuss limitations
of armament with the United States.
He pointed out at the same time
that thelife of the United Kingdom,
also of Australia and New Zeland,
was built upon sea power "the basis
of the whoJe empire's existence."
Discussing the relations between
Great Britain and the United States
the Prime Minister said:
."Friendly cooperation with the
United States is, for us, a cardinal
principle dictated by what seems to
us the proper nature of things, by
instinct quite as much as by reason
and common sense.
"We are ready to discuss with Am
erican statesmen any proposal for
the limitation of armament which
they wish to set forth and we can
understand that no such overtures
will find lack of willingness on our
part to meet them.
'JURY FOR TRIAL OF MAN
WHO POISONED GIRL DRAWN
By AftNorlatrd PrM)
Corunnn, Mich., June 200. A ten
tative jury was completed in circuit
court here late today for the trial
of Forrest Higgins, twenty-two,
. charged with murder in connection
with the death of Lucy Wittum, 19,
whose body was found near the ad
joining farms of the Higgins and
Wittum families, April 1.
Higgins is accused of giving Miss
Wittum poison upon (learning she
waR in a delicate condition.
More than 100 witness have been
subpoenaed, the majority by prose-
cution.
' SOUTHERN GOLF TOURNEY
BEGINS AT NASHVILLE
Nashville, Tenn., June 20. More
than 100 golf players are expected to
tee off tomorrow in the qualifying
round of the 19th annual southern
amatuer golf championship.
The final result is more in doubt
this summer than in several years for
an addition to the absence in Eng
land of Bobby Jones, Atlanta title
holder, Nelson Whitney, of New Or-
BORAX TKORAX SOW
RACE TO TIGHTEN TAP
MEDICINAL BEERS
House and Senate Want
Docs to Prescribe
Real Bevo
(By Aaaoclated Pre
Washington, June 20. The Senate
started a race with the house today
to outlaw medical beer.
Just after the House rules com
mittee had concluded a long hearing
on a proposal to give the Volstead
anti-beer and general prohibition
tightening up measure right of way,
Senator Willis, republican, of Ohio,
introduced a special bill containing
the beer and other uncontraverted
sections of the Volstead bill with the
hope of having it passed before the
prohibition commissioner promul
gates medical beer regulations un
der the opinion handed down by for
mer Attorney General Palmer.
In view of the statement by Pro
hition leaders before the house com
mittee that they were unwilling to
redraft the Volstead supplemental
bill and their request that it be ex
pedited as emergency legislation.
there was much speculation as to
whether the Volstead or Willis mea
sure could be put through first.
No friends have appeared in the
house in behalf of beer as a medicine
and Chairman Campbell,, of the rules
cotnmittee, on that question by de
claring a bill to prevent its sale on
a doctor's prescription would pro
bably be passed unanimously. The
committee will decide late in the week
whether the Volstead bill or any part
of it will be given top place on the
house calendar.
In introducing his bill Senator
Willis said he was actuated by the
discussion and delay concerning the
bill pending in the house". In addi
tion to prohibiting the prescription
of beer as medicine the measure
would provide that not more than
the same amount of alcohol in wine
may be prescribed within ten days
than is now authorized for spirituous
liquors, which is one half pint.
OF
COUNTRY CLUB WILL
BE WEDNE
T
The opening of the Putnam Coun
ty Country Club. on Wednesday even
ing will be marked by a dance at the
club. The Putnam Orchestra will fur
nish the music for the occasion which
promises to be one of the most de
lightful of the season. The large
dance hall will be artistically deco
rated with the season's flowers and
should prove one of the most attrac
tive places and coolest . spots any
where in the country.
Beginning on Wednesday night and
anytime afterward, Mrs. Johnson in
charge of the culinary , arrangements
for the club, will be in position to
furnish any sized crowds or parties
with a delicious meal on a very short
notice. All that will be necessary
will be to call up Mrs. Johnson at
the Country Club, 2021 is the num
ber and tell her your wants and shej
will be only too glad to mak the
necessary arrangements. It h pre
dicted that she will be busy all the
time, for her fame as a culinarr ex
pert is well known.
There are any number of surprises
in store for the members of the mem.
bers of the club, both at tha Wednes
day nigTit and afterwards for ach
day has seen some improvement,
some convenience added for the com
fort and pleasure of the members.
After it is -completed, nil the addi
tions made, it will then he up to the
members to make the club. The mem
bers can make it what they would
have it.
leans, former champion, and Reuben
Bush and Whitney Bouden, two other
New Orleans stars, will not compete.
WILL PROVE
CAPITAL SHIPS ARE
OBSOLETEJN WAR
Grand Armada of Aerial
Ships to Attack
Water Craft .
GERMAN SUB IS VICTIM
Not Believed That All
of Planes Will Get
a Shot
(liy Aaaoclated Preaa)
Langley Field, Va., June 20. The
greatest armada of air fighters ever
gathered by the war department in
time of peace is resting here tonight
rfacy at a moment's notice to hop
fif.M che field tome row for practical
der ..stration w nv t"v yn
ma. the day ct capita', batthslnp."
' past.
Across Hampton Roads, at the
naval base, several score of Uncle
Sam's air boats are tuned up to take
first action in the bombing of the
ex-German submarine U-117, which
is to take place tomorrow off th
Virginia capes. The van- guard of
attacking planes will reach the tar
get fifteen miles east of Cape
Charles at 9 a. m,, none but navy ma.
chines participating in the opening
attack.
iirfwediately, behind -tha-
scouts will fly nine planes of the F-BL
type, each of which will carry four
bombs slung in its carriage. A tor
pedo plane division of five Martin
bombers will follow with 'six bombs
each to release. Four machines of
the N. C. type, similar to those un
der command of Lieut. Reed in the
first trans-Atlantic flight, will fol
low .with cargoes of four bombs each
and the column will be closed by a
marine corps division of six deHavi-land-
bombers carrying two bombs
apiece. ,
Flyers at Langley field do not ex
pect to have a chance at the sub
marine. Expert opinon, given unof
ficially at Langley Feld, does not ex
peqt even that the last plan in the
navy's formation will find it neces
sary to release their bombs. But pro
vision is made for the Langley bomb
ers to finish the job if the U-117 still
remains afloat when the navy finishes.
ARBITRATORS TO SETTLE
(Si Aaaaclatad Ptaal
Washington, Jone 20. President
Harding has approved a suggestion
of the Shipping Board that settlement
of approximately $300,000,000 in
claims against the board be placed in
the hands of a board of three arbi
trators to be appointed by the Pre
sident, it was announced today at the
shipping board.
Heretofore the board has acted in
the capacity as both defendant and
judge in the matter of claims, Chair
man Lasker explained.
The agreement of the Hamburg
American Line with the Harriman in
terest to reopen the trade route for
merly controlled by Germany was
announced today. However no action
with regard to alocating shipping
board vessels to the Harrison inter
ests to re-establish the routes has
been taken by the board. .
STEAMER EASTSIDE HELD
UP BEFORE SAILING
nr Annoclnttd Preaa)
Norfolk, June 20. Ready to sail
with a cargo of coal for Dublin the
steamer Eastside was yesterday or
dered held here by the department
of justice until a thorough inquiry
could be made among members of
the crew as to the machine guns put
aboard the steamer at New York last
week.
TODAM IROBllCK DIES
BY OWN HAND AT
LAKE CITY. HOME
Was One of Columbia's
Most Prominent
Citizens
Was Packing Grip Ready
to Make Trip When
Shot Fired
' (By Aaaovlalrd Pr'eaa)
. .Lake City, June 20. W. J. Robuck,
superintendent of the State convict
road board, twice a member of the
legislature and well known through-1
out the state, was found dead in his;
apaitment here late today with a bul
let wound through his heart.
It was believed that Mr. Robuck
accidentally shot himself when exam
ining his pistol. A short while before
he had been talking, with frinds ana
appeared in excellent spirits. He had
been packing a hand bag preps ra-
tory to making a trip on official busi
ness.
Mr. Robuck is survived by hiswif,,
Mrs. Mamie Green Robuck, and a
son. He was a member of several fra.
ternal organizations, including the
Masons, Knights,, of 4 Pythias and
Woodmen of the Wold. . i
. In 1920 he. wfljBaj aodWa$efj for
niJiniitaiifffiT 'tu (iWe lailiuaxl commis
sion. He was apointed as head of the
convict road board in 1919 following
the reorganization of the state road
department.
Mr Robuck was born and spent
his early days in Hamilton county.
He came to Lake City in the early
90's where he was signally honored on
several occasions. He was twice
elected to represent Columbia at Tal
lahassee. MICANOPY DEPUTY
DIES .OF WOUNDS
MADE BY NEGRO
By Aaaorlatrd Pvaaa)
Gainesville, June 20. Robert E.
Arnow, deputy sheriff of Micanopy
died at the Williams Sanatorium this
morning as the result of a pistol
wound inflicted by a negro, John
Bowyer, at Micanopy, Saturday night.
Arnow was attempting to arrest the
negro on a charge of carrying a pis
tol when the negro fired.
Bowyer escaped into a swamp and
this morning a large posse have the
woods near Kirkwood surrounded, be
lieving the negro is in them. Momen
tary capture is expected in which
event violence is feared.
HOUSE WOULD ADMIT ALIENS
SAILING BEFORE JUNE 8
By Aaanlatd Praa
Washington, June 20. The John
son bill, to permit aliens who sailed
on or before June 8, last, to land at
American ports was passed late to
day by the house. The excess admit
ted over the June quota established
under the percentage immigration law
would be charged off against later
monthly quotas. The number which
the measur ewould permit to enter
the United States this time is esti
mated at approximately 10,000. The
bill now goes to the senate.
It is designed to relieve congestion
at ports, especially at New York.
DELIVERY WAGON BUMPS
PACKAGE BOY OFF WHEEL
Henry Weston, a negro boy em
ployed as delivery boy by Thomas
Cannon, was run into and painfully
injured yesterday afternoon on Lemon
street in front of Dr. Steen's resi
dence by the delivery truck of the
Economy Co., driven by Joe Wilkin
son. The boy was given medical at
tention by Dr. Steen and it was dis
covered that he was not seriously
hurt.
CUBANS RIOT AT GRAVE
OF FORMER PRESIDENT
Z; THREE - KILLEO
Casket ' Is Center of a
Bloody Outbreak at
Havana Cemetery
(By An4!ad Preaa
Havana, June, June 20. Cuban
military forces and police were or
dered to adopt extreme precautions
today to prevent a recur- ence of
rioting which yesterday marred fun
eral services for former President
Gomez.
Three persons wsre killed and
more than twenty injured in fighting
at the very gates of Colon cemetery,
where the body of the former presi
dent was being taken. Police were
blamed in some quarters for hasty
action in firing into the mob. An in
vestigation was to be made to lay.
The funeral se.vico had been neld
quietly, with the city in deepest
mourning. The cathedral was packed.
Gomez's body finally wa3 taken from
the edifice, and with the casket lying
on a gun caisoj-i, the long funeral
procession started for the cemetery.
At the cemetery gates there was a
disturbance. Old followers of Gomez
pushed through the police lines, at
tempting to take the casket from
the caisson and carry it to the grave
side on the shoulders. The police
promptly fired. Instantly the casket
was the center of the riot. The dis
turbance ended quickly, the dead and
injured were removed and the former
president's body carried to the grave
for final services.
NEW BATTLER MARYLAND TO
HAVE HER TRIAL TODAY
(Br Aaaarlatad Pra
Newport News, June 20.0 Twenty-five
officers, experts of high rank in
their several departments, and 36
naval men will accompany the bat
tleship Maryland when she leaves (he
dock tomorrow morning on her trial.
Among them will be Captain C. F.
Preston, her future commander, but
the ship will be in command of
Captain W. G. Melvin, of the ship
yard.
OR' ALDERMAN IS HELD
BLAMELESS OX CHARGE
MADE ByZPREACHERS
Tampa, June 20. Dr. R. H. Alder
man, president of Southern Collegu,
a Methodist institution, n:w tempo
rarily located at Clearwater, was ex
onerated of all susupicion of misap
plication of funds here today by
special board of inquiry headed by
Rev. B. P. Buhrman, presiding elder
of the Ocala district, Which heard
charges of mis-statements of facts
and disseminating doctrines contra
ry to tenets of the MethodiBt church,
preferred by Rev. E. M. Stanton,
Ozona, and Rev. S. P. Harris, Jack
sonville. Reverend Stanton, a professor at
Southern the past two years, was
not recommended for reappointment
to the faculty by the president and
the trustees replaced him.
Rev. Stanton, Rev. Harris and Rev.
Buhrman denied today that there was
any truth in the statement that Mr.
Alderman had been charged with
misuse or misapplication of unds. "Our
charges did not even intimate finan
cial discrepancies."
J. Edgar Wall, Tampa, chairman
of the trustees of Southern College,
said similar charges against the
president had been heard ten days
ago and that after a thorough inves
tigtion the trustees could find no ba
sis for them. Before the trustees Dr.
Alderman was also charged with pro
curing profession athletes for the
sihool. Mr. Wall pointed out that
President Alderman had expelled fle
of the team's leading football play
ers last fa'i wh- he learre.1 thai
they were feceiving financial tis-
tance from sources that left their
legitima-.y questioned.
1
PREDICTED
IN RANKS OF
Li
Veteran Head of Federa
tion Says He will Not
Withdraw
LEAVES inOMBERS
Action of Lewis Follows
Opposition to
Gompers-
Ilr Auodntrd PreoiO
Denver, Colo., June 20 John L.
Lewis, president of the United Mine
Workers of America, today formally
announced that he was a candidate
for the presidency of the American
Federation of Labor in opposition to
Samuel Gompers.
"I have decided to permit my name
to 'be submitted to the convention
as a candidate for the presidency of
the American Federation of Labor."
was the brief announcement made
by Mr. Lewis.- He declined to make
any further statement
Pdesident Gompers announced that
he will be a candidate for re-election
in the following statement:
"The delegation to the convention
will determine who shall be their
officers, and if they see fit to re-elect
their president they will have the -oportunity.
My name will not be
withdrawn.
4 Aaaaalated Preaa)
Denver, June 20. Supporters of
Samuel Gompers and John Lewis,
president of the United Mine Work
ers, who today announced his can
didacy, were tonight marshalling their
forces for the contest Vhich will de
cide whether the veteran leader shall
he returned to the presidency of the
Federation of Labor.
Both sides are making a canvass
of the situation and already declare
they have mustered sufficient force
to win.
The Gompers forces went into ae
tion immediately after the announce
ment of Lewis with a declaration
thft the veteran labor chief would
be a candidate and had no intention
of withdrawing from the race.
Mr. Gompers stated, however, that
"I consider the position of president
of the American Federation of Labor
so exalted and so dignied I would
not stoop to politics to attain it."
Except for his brief announcement
that he was a candidate, Mr. Lewis,
who heads the largest union in the
United States, declined to make any
statement. His supporters, however,
were active and claimed that they
had pledged more than 20,000 of the
38,294 votes in the convention. La
bor leaders pointed out tonight that
the candidacy of Lewis would change
the "whole political complexion" of
the convention. They said that there
probably would be candidates put in
to the field in opposition to the pre
sent members of the executive coun
cil. The candidacy of Lewis is the first
serious opposition that President
Gompers has had since 1894 when he
was defeated for reelection by John
McBride, a mine worker. Since that
time he has been elected year after
year by an almost unanimous vote.
' Anti-lobbying legislation, endorse
ment of farms loans, endowment of
industrial universities, establishment
of labor newspapers and a search for
(Continued on Page 6.)
HARD
II I) II H
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