OCR Interpretation


The Wilmington morning star. (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, February 01, 1940, Image 8

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1940-02-01/ed-1/seq-8/

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'Tell Bill Goodbye
(®> ’ssragaasr JfarieJjlizard .
SYNOPSIS
THE CHARACTERS:
FABIENNE SEYMOUR, rich, young
and beautiful.
NICKY BARTLETT, wealthy and in
love with Fabienne.
ELLEN CHAPMAN, young and cap
able mistress of Willoughby house.
DR. BILL MALLORY, close friend
of Ellen’s.
YESTERDAY: Nicky helps Fabienne
take her trunks to Ellen’s apart
ment, where they find Bill waiting
for her.
CHAPTER TWENTY-ONE
Fabienne was reminded of Nicky
standing at her elbow when he said
to Bill, “You look as if you could
handle them single handed. These
are three trunks and seven pieces
of smaller luggage."
"Righto,” Bill answered cheerfully.
"Go right on up. I'll have them up
In a jiffy.”
"Make it snappy," ordered Nicky.
•Miss Seymour wishes to leave
■hortly.”
Fabienne listened to this exchange
■with dismay. Whatever had got
into Nicky to behave this way. Sud
denly she knew, and she said apolo
getically, “Dr. Mallory, meet an old
friend of mine from home, Nicky
Bartlett.”
Nicky’3 well-bred face showed in
stant chagrin. He’d taken this great,
coatless fellow to be the superin
tendent. “Sorry, old man,” he said,
offering a friendly grin with his
hand. “Bad light, you know.”
“Forget it,” Bill answered, crush
ing Nicky’s hand in his.
Irritated for no good reason, Fa
bienne said, “Come on upstairs,
Nicky. “And,when they were up in
the apartment and Bill was strug
gling with a trunk at the turn of
the stairs, "Why did you say that I
was leaving shortly? I’m not going
any place.”
But you promised Mirabel you a
see her later.”
‘Tve got a headache, Nicky. To
morrow's Sunday. We can put it off
until then. Besides. I must do a lot
of unpacking. Please run along.
“I’ll be darned! A few hours ago
you were delighted to see me. Now
it’s ’Please run along Nicky, me
lad.’ What’s come over you lately,
Fah?”
' I’m sorry Nicky. I do behave
badly. But I was glad to see you.”
“Fab still loves Nicky?”
“Of course Fab still loves Nicky,”
she said, looking up at him affec
tionately, laughingly.
Her face was turned up like a
flower. He bent over to kiss her on
the cheek. But her mouth was red
and tempting. He kissed her once
and then again, lingeringly. She
tried to push him away, hearing a
sound at the door.
Bril Mallory stood !n the door
frame, looking embarrassed and
something else that she was too con
fused to recognize.
He had seen the kiss, but he had
not seen her feeble effort to push
Nicky away. He had heard her say
that she loved Nicky.
He eaid, “Sorry, folks, but you’ll
have to get a park bench until we
get the trunks in. Two more com
ing up.” He pulled one in with a
yank of a powerful arm and went
out again without looking at either
of them.
Fabienne looked at the dooi
through which he had passed. Then
ehe turned around to Nicky and
her cheeks were pink, her eyes hot.
‘Tve changed my mind, darling. I
will go back with you. I’d rather do
my unpacking tomorrow. Come
along.”
To Bill on the landing, she said.
"I’m going with Nicky. Thanks for
everything, Bill.”
"It’s nothing at all. Have a good
time,” he answered with coll polite
ness.
After the door closed in back of
Nicky and Fabienne, and the big
car roiled away smoothly, Bill Mal
lory sat on the landing step and
groped for a pack of cigarets. He
lit one thoughtfully and said, "That’s
that, my boy.”
In the town car Nicky was say
ing, “You and Cleopatra and your
‘infinitive variety’! There’s one
thing about you. Fab, that never
fails to fascinate me.”
"Yes?” she said absently, her
thoughts busy elsewhere.
*1__M -t , ^
-* VI1C
minute you will, the next minute
you won’t, or vice versa. Anyway,
I’m glad you decided to come."
"Oh, THAT!" she answered. "I—
I decided my headache wasn’t too
bad after all." Her statement was
a long way from being truthful.
She had decided that if she found
herself alone In the apartment with
Bill Mallory she’d find herself bleat
ing that she was not in love with
Nicky and the kiss he'd seen didn’t
mean anything.
And after that little idiotic out
burst, she thought, Bill would give
her a long look of surprise that
plainly said It meant nothing to him
and why was she telling him all
that.
Oh, no, she didn’t Intend to let
herself In for anything like that.
She must be very careful to see
Bill only when Ellen was there. A
friendly little threesome.
Nicky took her hand and her in
etinct was to pull It away. Instead,
she said to him, “Nicky, I wish
you’d try to be fascinating to me.”
Nicky gave her a bemused, puz.
zled glance.
"My heart ai)d. ipy. hand, not to
mention a few trifling lares and
penates, are yours for the asking,
darling.”
"I know,” she said wearily. ■
"How do you know? I’ve never
yealy asked you to marry me.”
She laughed. "That’s right, but J
got the idea somewhere.”
"That I’d be waiting around.”
She nodded.
"I am," he said dolefully. "But a
ehap sometimes gets tired of wait
ing too long. Some other girl might
come along and find me a prize.”
"iftshe did, darling, I’d probably
snail* you myself.”
“The trouble with you, Fab, is
that you don’t appreciate me.”
“Maybe that is my trouble,” she
agreed, laughing at him. “Is that
what you want in a girl?”
"That’s whit, every man wants—
appreciation. And when he gets it,
it doesn’t much matter whether the
girl is a beauty like you—or some
plain little gal like Ellen Chap
man.”
“Why don't you go to work.
Nicky? Maybe I’d appreciate you
then. Your life is such a waste. You
can’t spend your whole life piaying
polo, hunting, sailing, flying!”
“Don’t you see, Fab—you want
me to go to work because you think
it’s the right thing to do. That
hasn’t anything to do with me. I m
doing things that are right for me.
I don’t have to work and you
haven't given me any good reason
for doing it.”
His words reminded her of some
thing Aunt Edna had said:
“Nicky might do it for some girl
if he had to work to gain her esti
mation. Another girl, perhaps. But
if he’d been going to do it for you,
he'd have done it long ago."
Nicky hadn’t noticed her alienee.
He was continuing: “Interesting
looking chap, Mallory. Friend of
yours?”
“Elien's beau. Didn’t I tell you?”
• « »
And Bill was telling Elien: "She’s
gone."
“What do you mean, Bill? Was
she alone? Going to a party?"
“Don’t know. She was with a fel
low—Nicky Bartlett. Know him?”
“Only from hearing Fabienne talk
about him. He comes from Mary
land.”
“What’s he do?”
“Work? Nothing. He’s one of the
millionaire Bartletts of the tobacco
family. He’s been trying to marry
Fab for the last eight years.”
Bill tamped tobacco into his pipe
with thoroughness. “Looks as if he
wouldn’t have to wait much longer.”
Ellen laughed. “You doti’t know
Fab. She's very fond of Nicky, but
she told me that she ioves him like
a brother and wouldn’t dream o!
marrying him.”
Bill’s eyes changed from gray to
blue. He said, '‘No?”
Ellen smiled at him, shaking her
head. ‘‘No. Bill. Clear field and good
luck to you:”
(To Be Continued)
Indianapolis Banker
Is Indicted By U. S.
INDIANAPOLIS, Jan. 31.—CD—
A federal drive to clean up alleged
WPA ‘‘dirt’ in Indiana—marked al
ready by the conviction of eight
persons, including a former mayor
of Kokomo—brought indictment to
day of Arthur V. Brown, president
of two Indianapolis banks and a
leader in civic affairs, and four
other persons.
The latest set of indictments is
based, District Attorney Val Nolan
said, on the building of drives and
streets through private property.
Accused with Brown are Miss Eliz
abeth C. Claypool, Indianapolis club
woman and member of a widely
known family; Carl F- Kdrtepeter,
former county WPA coordinator;
Arthur F. Eickhoff, real estate
owner, and Charles E. Jefferson,
former member of tie county flood
control board.
The charge is conspiracy to de
fraud the government through di
version of WPA labor and money.
The possible penalty is two years
in prison and a 75,000 fine.
-*
SAYS REPORT UNTRUE
OTTAWA, Jan. 31.—<D—Defense
Minister Norman Rogers today de
scribed as "totally untrue” the
charge of conservative leader R. J.
Manion that many Canadian sol
diers were taken ill because of lack
of proper clothing and blankets.
The minister issued a statement in
reply to charges Manion made in
parliament Jan. 25.
■ ■ ■ 1 ■ ■ II -11 ■■1 1 ■■
THIS CURIOUS WORLD B/4u«T
■ ..- ■ ■ - . ■■ - ' ■ ■
"G^UMPy," 250-L&.IVRTLB
OP THE AAARINE ZOO,
AT ST AUGUSTINE, FLORIDA,
IS/HC'ZZ/L&O BV DIVERS
AT FEEDING TIAAE, UNTIL.
THE OTHER. LESS GREEDY
AND PUGNACIOUS
SPECIMENS HAVE DINED
W COPR. 1940 BV NEA SERVICE. INC.
DO LEAVES j |
CCj'jPZ. /AV7To> /Pry/ / <r \
on hot dbv days
IN SKI IMS,
the Z-&F7~ le<3
IS INJURED ABOUT
TWICE AS OFTEN
AS THE &/<5/~/T
ANSWER: To conserve moisture by preventing exposure of their
evaporating surface.

DAILY CROSSWORD
ACROSS
1. Accumulate
6. A tree
11. Goal
13. Black
14. Concludes
15. A secretion
16. Sack
18. Know
19. Crowns of
heads
21. Discolor
24. Manufac
turer
27. Ogling
28. Shop
29. For
30. Wrath
31. Hardwood
tree
33. A modified
leaf
35. Muddle
36. Slow (mus.)
37. Comforts
39. Any split puli
42. Seed-vessel
43. Macabees
(abbr.)
45. Hodgepodge
47. Card game
48. Of kind
disposition
51. Dispatches
52. Clay deposit
DOWN
1. Fatty
2. Bill of fare
3. Questions
4. Pig pen
5. Chinese rivet
6. Mother
7. Goddess Of
mischief
8. A flower
9. Metal-bear-;
ing vein
I
10. Trap
12. Tidy
16. Fringe of
hair
17. Jewels
19. A game
20. Ironic essay!
22. Prefigured
23. Ventilated
25. Mohamme
dan bible
26. Build
31. Watchdogs
32. Pile
33. Lost blood ‘
34. Codlike fish l
38. Single \
40. Medicinal =
plant j
41. Jungle beast ]
43. Match
44. God of war <
46. Queer <
47. Back
49. Hie situs I
(abbr.) I
50. Diminutive
of Albert
I
n 12
zzz~zzzzzzz
J5 ^16 n 77 is —
. zmtz~ztm~
6 21 22 23 ^2H 25 26
27 7^28
lEiiiii!! 1
31 32^33 34
35 ^36
zzmzzzzzzzz
39 HO HI 77 42 77 43 44
zzzzzrm. ~~~
48 49 50
hi r i»m
■ ^ ^
'istributed by King Features Syndicate. Inc.. .2-~l
OUT OUR WAY
By J. R. Williams
MA* OH, \
MA' \
WHERE’LL |
VI DUMP I
THIS ASH /
TRAY? /
/ NOT ON THE \
/ RUGS--ALONG >
/ THE WALL THERE,
I ON THE POLISHED
I FLOOR--IT’S EASIER
Wo CLEAN- MUCH^y
WHY MOTHERS GET GRAY
£r.ff.W»U!AMc> I
OUR BOARDING HOUSE . . with . ., Major IW
r HALLOO, TIFFANY ! HOMEWARE
BOUND?-— HMP-KAFF/——
JUST ESCORTING SC RAM WOLD
TO THE TRACK FOR A
' TRIAL SPIN—~ CARE TO
COME AND SEE THE jtZy
\ OLD FELLOW SIZZLE
' AROUND THE OVAL ?
MOPE, I SEE
DOGS RUM THROUGH t - %
YARD/— I AL^O <=r- - = ?
that PATCHED B' ANK-t I
THAT YOU FINALLY GOT ' %
AROUND TO MY bed/-_ H
LAST WEEK YOU SNATCUTv \
BUSTERS QUILT FOR SCRAM
SNORE ON/— |F AMY mo--°)
EDCLOTHES ARE WAFTED Awav '
ME LL ALL TURN ESKIMO AMD*;
CEMAND BLUBBER ° j
,.3, wmmammm \ %
w COPR. 194Q BY WEASERYtCg, WC. T. M. REO. U. S. RAT. OFF, f
* MAKES A
{ BLANKET CHARGE
LITTLE ORPHAN ANNIE
CONGRATULATIONS]
MR. DISTRICT
ATTORNEY- »
^ NO STATEMENT ? |
PERHAPS YOU WILL I
LET YOUR DEEDS
SPEAK FOR YOU- /
Jjanr-,!-^
ris tT TRUE ’
YOU PLAN TO |
SMASH EVERY
RACKET IN
TOWN IN SIX
MONTHS? J
'— ' ■ ff
IS IT TRUE 1
YOU VE ORDERED
NICK GATT'S J I
ARREST? J '
WHAT IS YOUR ,
STAND ON CRIME?
h^tj4
YOU'RE APPOINTED
TO FILL OUT JACK
SLACK'S TERM-WILL
(DU THEN RUN FOR
ELECTION?
VjrM OPPOSED
' THAT’S ALL I CAN
I GIVE OUT TODAY
T/
THATS A CORKER!
WHAT'S HIS STAND
ON CRIME? HE'S
OPPOSED TO IT—
I TOLD YOU THAT
LAD HAD BRAINS- HE
KEEPS HIS MOUTH SHUT
HM-M—STILL, I WONDER
IF HE REALLY BELIEVES
THE ONWARD AND >
UPWARD LEAGUE PUT S
HIM IN THAT JOB- M
--J&..
r
HOW CAN
YOU TELL
WHAT
A GUV
UKE THAT
IS
THINKtNG? j
!
WASH TUBBS
A Desperate Gang
By Roy Crane
' YOU'VE FOLLOWED ME THIS FAR, ^ M
MATTIE. UNLESS THAT WATCHMAN 8
IS ON GUARD, I RECKON THERE'S |
NO HARM IN YOUR GOING TO THE §
OIL WEIL...ONLY KEEPgUIET^j f
' HERE VT IS.
THE 6E0LO6I5T SA.IO
ID RRD A. TIHV HOLE
IH THE PIPE WITH
A. PLUS IH rr.
AH!
BLAZES! AMD THE PROOF,MATTIE,"I
THAT VOUR ORAMpMOTHER'S STOCK ISWT
WORTHLESS. THERE S THE SECRET THAT
THE OIL MEW ARE SO DESPERATE IW TRVIW6
TO KEEP. SO DESPERATE THAT y
'TTHEVD KILL AMV MAW WHO Y
-r LEARWED IT y——y
W I HEAR. ^
f VOICES ! , 1
S0MEB0P/5 1
GASOLINE ALLEY
No Use Being- Snooty
f I'M AFKAIP TOLTLL)
HAVE TO SEE HIM I
W HIS OFFICE. C
MISS SWIFE^Z
f WLME1?, WIU. YOU SEE Ml?7
WUMPLE 0(S SHALL ( ASM
I HIM TO COMe AM? SEE YOd? .
rNSVFf? WM
MISS SNIPS, TM I
WILLIN' TO <30 I
to seemJ
Copyright, 1940. br Thg Chicago TrAone.
HIE GUMPS
Mamma Starts Somethin?
/ HA-HA-I'LU NEVER FORfcriT
■I The time i saved yooRuo&
J FORyoU-WHEN you broke a
l SlNKFUUO' DISHES-VOU WERE
\ nervous because vt was the
iVpAV BEFORE TOUR N\ARRt Afc»E
ilMmir-v—-^to that bowleseiEd
•' H JL ' RAU.ROAO BRAKIE
IT WAS SAMUEL
SNOOT-ER-AW-l
MEAN ,YOU MUST
WAVE ME CONFUSED 9
WITH SOMEBODY
I EUSE-l DON'T KNOW/
l WHAT TOU'RE J
\ Talking AB^tr-M
I R*«C- u. S. Pit'piri ' ' '--"^5
* Copyright, 1940. bv T- rh,T“f" 1ntni
/-IN THOSE DAYS l WAS
I A WAITRESS - AMD A
EfOOD ONE—AMD I STIU
/too mat consider ^
' this interview
Closed; toor little
1 SHAKEDOWN SAME
\ WON'T WORK WITH i
KME-<a&C»C>DAT;/J
/ SO THAT'S WHAT YOU
THINK, YOU OLD BUZZARD/
well;your evil mind /
, HAS SIVEN ME AN IDEA \ /
V <bOOD DAY TO YOU)'
BRICK BRADFORD—And the Metal Monster
By William Ritt and Clarence Graj
IlHEMAYOR ARRIVES,AT FORT MATTHEWS)
THIS IS THE MAYOR OF METROPOU
HE HAS, I BELIEVE, ARRANGED AN
INTERVIEW WITH BRIGADIER v-j
GENERAL CARAPACE y——> I
1J the general awaits
f. THE mayor in his
QUARTERS. I AM TO ACT
AS YOUR ESCORT ^-*
THAT'S THE SITUATION, GENERAL. WE DO NOT
KNOW WHERE THE METAL MONSTER AND y
THE GANG WHICH OPERATES IT HAVE y1J
THEIR HEADQUARTERS / y. ■■ ---i-'
A3- I
WASHINGTON HAS GIVEN ME AUTHORITY
TO AID YOU IN EVERY WAY POSSIBLE. ,
IF THE MONSTER SHOULD REAPPEAR]
CALL ME AT ONCE' i

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