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The Wilmington morning star. [volume] (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, February 09, 1940, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1940-02-09/ed-1/seq-2/

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TWO _
WARMER WEATHER
SCHEDULED TODAY
Increasing Cloudiness, Gentle
To Moderate W'inds
Are Forecast
_ !
Slightly warmer weather today
Was forecast by weathermen last
Bight after the mercury had dropped
■gain to a below-normsl level Wi I
Besday night.
Lowest temperature this morning
to expected to be about 40 degrees.
Increasing cloudiness and steadily
rising temperatures were included
on today's weather menu. Gentle
variable winds will become moderate
today and possible fresh southerly,
weathermen said.
Yesterday, the mercury dipped to
a low of 34 degrees, but during the
day it climbed to a peak of 56 de
grees. The mean was two below the
47 degree normal mark.
HUDSON SLAYING
CLUE UNCOVERED
(Continued from Page One)
waddings were found near the body,
Coroner Pope said.
Hudson was either killed late Sat
urday night or early Sunday morn
ing the coroner said. The man was
last seen late Saturday afternoon.
Officers said that one white man,
who they said had acted as “a sort
of companion" to Hudson, and three
negroes are being held for question
ing in connection with the slaying,
although no formal charges have
been lodged against them.
Coroner Pope said that the white
man, whose name was not disclosed,
was first suspicioned because "he
began spending too much money
since Sunday." The man usually had
very little money, he said, but had
flourished large dmounts after the
week-end. He had given each of the
three negroes $5 and they were held
merely as witnesses, he said.
Hudson’s pockets had been rifled
and all money, except a few pen
nies, had been removed. Robbery
has been advanced as the motive for
the slaying.
Residents of Hampstead said that
Hudson, who made his living selling
fish, usually carried a large amount
of money in his pockets, using two
pocketbooks.
r. Sheriff Brqwn said that J. F.
Bradshaw, Jr., and a fingerprint ex
pert from the SBI are still working
on the case at Hamrstead and that
they would continue their investiga
tion today.
"It's a very tough case,” he said,
"but we hope to discover something
that will lead us to the killer.”
The axe, officers said, was the
chief clue that has been discovered
so far in the investigation and they
hope that this instrument will lead
to the slayer.
BRUNSWICK SEEKS
FUNDS FOR ADULT
DRIVERS FOR BUSES
(Continued From Page One)
driver was not to blame for the ac
cident.
The commission instructed Its
transportation director, L. C. Thorn
ton, to survey the situation and see
what could be done. Virtually all
school bus drivers in the state are
pupils, and the pay is low.
The commission also asked the di
vision of pu refuse and contract to
buy about BOO new buses to replace
obsolete vehicles. The division has
bought 600 new buses each year for
the last two years.
FRANCE GIVES REDS
NEAR EAST WARNING
(Continued from Page One)
nies, and exclude North Afri
ca and Syria.
jhC source which told of the
French troop concentration in
the Near East said they were
so placed to “prepare for all
Russian or German threats in
the Balkans or the Caucasus.”
Britain and her ally. Egypt,
also have extensive forces in
the Near East—the British in
Egypt, where defense of the
Suez Canal Zone is one of their
duties, Palestine and elsewhere.
London military sources said
there had been big movements
of British troops in the east
since me wai uc^ou.
plained that drafts of both
white and native troops left
India—where there is a peace
time army of 60,000 whites and
150,000 natives—England and
other parts of the empire to
“augment considerablj the
normal force of 12,000 in Egypt
and 5,000 in Palestine.
The French concentration—
centering in Syria—is com
manded by General Maxime
Weygand, 72-year-old former
chief of the French general
staff, who arrived in Cairo,
Egypt, yesterday with Admiral
Jean Esteva, commander-in
chief of the French Mediter
ranean fleet, to inspect Brit
ish and Egyptian defenses.
Previous French statements have
nade it clear that should the wai
spread to the Near East. Gen
Weygand, who was the right hanc
nan of Marshal Ferdinand Foct
n the later stages of the World
var. would command the Allied
forces.
The Caucasus mountains stretct
icross Soviet Russian territory be
:ween the Black and Caspian seas
pn a path leading to Turkey and
Syria. Turkey has mutual assist
ince pacts with Britain and France.
(Coincidentally, a Budapest dis
patch said neutral nations oi
southeastern Europe would hav<
ponscript armies on a war foot
ng by mid-March as a precau
tionary measure against an>
springtime threat to their peace.)
CATHOLICS URGE
‘GUILD’ SYSTEM
(Continued From Page One)
the position they occupy in the la
bor market, but according to thi
diverse functions which they exer
rise in society.”
(Guilds governed the craftsmen ol
Europe during the middle ages.)
Rejecting both "extreme individ
ualism” and "collectivism” in gov.
ernment policy, the archbishops and
bishops who comprise the adminis
tratlve board of the National Catho
lie Welfare Conference declared:
"Our economic life must be reor
ganized not on the disintegratin?
principles of individualism but or
the constructive principle of socia
and moral nity among the mem
bers of human society.”
In “the church and the social or
der,” a 34-page statement on con
litions in the United States, the pre
iates presented what Catholic sour
ces considered their response to ths
recent encyclical which Pope XI]
addressed to the church in the Unit
The NCWC called it "the most im
portant utterance made by the Cath
olic hierarchy since the bishops' pro
gram of reconstruction of 1919."
The prelates declared that:
The state must regulate the socia
responsibility of property so tha
the burden of providing for the com.
mon good is equitably distributed.
To protect its rights, labor runs
be free to bargain collectively, bu
"the principle of force" is equall;
wrong when used by labor or capi
tal.
"Security of the workingman a
against unemployment, old age, sick
ness, accident and death, must in
frankly accH'tcd as a social respon
sibility of industry jointly with so
ciety.”
A living wage must provide de
cent support both for the working
man and his family, and must maki
possible savings to meet unempioy
ment, sickness, death and old age
Surveying the entire field of ecc
nomic life, the prelates said:
“It is manifestly impossible to ex
pect good economic order if wages
prices, working condition and th
public good are left to chance or ti
haphazard methods of so-called fre
enterprise.”
PELLEY TESTIFIES
OF BLASTED AIM!
(Continued from Page One)
toward Pelley, despite branding hi
organization "fascistic.”
These charges were based upo;
documents purchased from Davi
Mayne, a former Pelley employ
here, by Harold Weisbergi a forme
employe of the senate civil libertie
committee, and by Gardner Jackso;
of labor’s non-partisan league. The;
were inserted in the Congressiona
Record by Rep. Hook (D-Mich). bu
were withdrawn when Mayne an
Pelley declared they were forgeries
The documents purported to be lei
tcrs from Pelley to Mayne.
Weisberg and Jackson aske
United States Attorney David Pin
today to take criminal actloi
against Mayne.
William A. Roberts, attorney fo
Weisburg and Jackson, said that
complaint had been filed chargln
Mayne with defrauding Jacksor
who paid $105 for the letters.
, Pine declined to discuss the mal
ter on the ground that policy pr<
hibited disclosure of complaint
pending the issuance of warrants
At today’s hearing, the commi:
tee spent more than a little tim
choking off Pelley’s protestation
of support for its activities. H
managed to say at one point, how
ever, that his admiration was so
deep and abiding that if the com
mittee continues its work he would
be willing to "fold up" the Silver
Shirts, and do it with his "blessing."
During a recess, one committee
man, half angry and half dis
gusted, said Pelley was trying to
give the committee "the kiss of
death."
Pelley’s testimony that he had
expected his organization might
make him head of the government
was in response to questions from
Rep. Casey (D-lIass).
"If the Silver Shirts had achieved
their aim," Casey asked him, would
you have been in charge of the
government?”
"Probably.’’
"And if you had become the lead
er of the country would you have
put into effect Hitler's policies
with respect to the Jews?”
"I probably would, sir.1’
TURKEY SEIZES
GERMAN-OWNED
MARINE WORKS
(Continued From Page One)
race to line Turkey up for the "dur
tion.")
On Bosphorus Straits
The Golden Horn, on which the
huge Krupp yards are located, is an
inlet of the strategic Bosphor s
Straits which separate Asia Minor
from Europe.
Large-scale departures of German
residents from Turkey, particularly
businessmen, were disclosed in of
ficial quarters.
Some quarters attributed the
exodus to Germany's desire to get
all her manpower home as soon as
possible for a big drive against Bri
tain and France. Others blamed the
feeling that t\ar may spread to
southeastern Europe and the near
east in the spring.
Considerable significance was seen
also in a trip to Egypt by Gen.
Maxime Weygand. commander of
France's near eastern forces.
France has 275,000 men concen
trated in the near east and Egypt
is expected to serve as a reservoir
for troops and supplies in event of
a Britisli-French-Turkish attack —
as some observers prophesy—: gain t
Soviet Russia's vital Caucasian oil
fields.
German businessmen ha\e had
monopo'ies in some fields in Turkey
and German specialists were numer
ous in this country until the out
break of the European war and
Turkey’s subsequent alignment with
Britain and France.
German influence has been on the
wane, however, in recent months
and the activities of German Am
bassador Franz ^ on Papen, Ad' -f
Hitler's ace troubleshooter, ha, e
come in for outspoken criticism ' i
the Turkish press.
Foreign observers saw the seizure
of the Krupp plant and the other
measures directed against German
interests as a logical sectuence to the
recent declaration of Sukru Sara
coglu. Turkish foreign minister, that
' Turkey is not neutral but only non
belligerent for the moment.’
The ornate marble tomb of
General U. S. Grant on P,iverside
Drive, New York, was built by
popular subscription.
SOVIETS CLAIM
CAPTURE OF 13
FINNISH FORTS
(Continued From Page One)
and hand grenades which they
throw if attacked.
Finnish advices from the front
indicated Russia's 250,000 men
were attacking as follows:
Approximately 100,000 in the
battle centering at Summa on the
Isthmus of Karelia, in southeast
Finland.
Another 100,000 northeast of
Lake Ladoga.
| Several thousands at Suomussal
mi, approximately 200 miles farther
north at the eastern end of Fin
land’s narrow “waist.”
Forty-five thousand or more in
positions at Salla, 150 miles north
of Suomussalmi.
No one here would estimate the
Finnish strength or Finnish losses
on any front beyond the state
ment that both figures were "far
fewer” than those for the Russians.
Luminous beetles are carried by
certain natives of South America
when they journey at night.
A little town in the province of
Limburg, Holland, is called Ameri
ca.
METHODISTS HOLD
MEET HERE TODAY
(Continued from Page One)
tion of the Rev. TV. A. Cade, dis
trict superintendent.
Among the speakers will be the
Rev. F. S. Love, the Rev. R. TV.
Bradshaw, the Rev. Floyd Patter
son, and Mrs. H. J. Faison, who
will discuss the theme of ‘‘Metho
dist Advance" and important phases
of the work of the church.
Thirty three pastors and a large
number of laymen and women from
the 136 churches comprising the
Wilmington district are planning
to attend.
----
Irvin S. Cobb, tf7~7~7''
ince conducted a cr
'Sour Mash" for ' 'i
Evening Post. " -• ;,.e
At»VERTlSEMEVp~^
WHAnO DO FOR
THE iTCH (Scabies)
Relief fror- itch, or that, o,
known as rr .oies. scratch.* «0iai«c«
or 7-year \ch, is quick-' I f5 N
' David’s Ss_uatlve Wash -‘i i?!?a
phur solution which destro’-sT?u;<i !
germs which it contact* 'rV-^ose lteS
that fiery, tormenting ltcMnr
any druggist or postpit' Me a
back If not relieved Owens * $»<?
Rlchmor u, Va, (adv.) ^
II 25% Irish whiskey. 75% American «rai(ht whiskey
H William Jameson & Co., Inc., N. Y. C j
BOTTLED
IN BOND
UNDER U. S. GOV'T SUPERVISION
THIS WHISKEY IS
4 YEARS OU)_
1
M
' 1
l
90*
PINT
1.70
QUART
100 PROOF
National Distillers Prod.Cotp.,N*¥.
SC Thermostatically Controlled
Heat in All Super'Coaches
Sample One-Way Fares
Miami, I la. _$ 9.10
Jacksonville. Fla. _ 5.10
Charleston, S. C. 2.30
Tampa, Fla. . 7.50
St. Petersburg, Fla. ... 8.05
MOON BOS TERMINAL
m • ^B JB A IB I I I I I ^B
3
3
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