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The Wilmington morning star. (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, February 15, 1940, Image 10

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1940-02-15/ed-1/seq-10/

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xuiv ___ _______________
"Teli: Bin Goodbye
'7S&XXSSS Sif Jfarje Slizard y
CHAPTER THIRTY-THREE
Fabienne untied the big apron she
had put on over her ski pants, hung
it on a nail and surveyed four glas
ses of only slightly burned apple
butter with pride.
“Hey, wait a minute:” Bill said
getting’off the kitchen table where
he had been watching Fabienne’s
culinary achievement. ‘‘You don’t
think you’re done, do you?”
“You wouldn’t like me to eat it,
too, would you? Surely not after
that dinner?’
‘‘We’ve got to take it back to
town. I’m going to keep it all for
mself and eat it for breakfast
every day—thinking about you.
"Oh!” Sometimes Bill said things
he ought not to say. And did things
he ought not do. Like having that
newspaper picture of her on his
highboy. She supposed the Thomas
sino child had given it to him and
he’d pulled it out of his pocket and
forgotten about it. But he oughtn t
to do things like that, not when he
was trying to woo Ellen.
A small frown puckered her
brow. She wondered what Eilen was
thinking of her at the moment. Bill
had practically dismissed Ellen,
sending her off for a walk with
Nicky, while Fabienne and Bili
peeled apples and stirred them
while they stewed in cider at the
back of the big range. Any other
girl would have been jealous and
showed it. Fabienne most certainly
would not have taken that dis
missal.
There was one small comfort, she
thought, and that was that Ellen
and Nicky always had plenty to talk
about. She'd been afraid they’d find
nothing in common and she wanted
her friends to like each other.
It would not be hard to like
Ellen, but Nicky was a different
matter altogether. Fortunately,
Nicky had been a different Nicky
these last few weeks, since the wed
ding, from the old Nicky. Not only
was he practically on the water wa
gon, but he was really settling down
to work, bringing them enthusiastic
accounts of what he was doing. "I’m
only a glorified office boy now, but
I'm getting the hang of things.
Who’d think Nicky’d ever have an
ambition to carry on the glorious tra
ditions of the Bartlett name?”
Fabienne said truthfully that she
was not one of them. Ellen, whc
was not at all surprised by Nicky’s
settling down, said nothing.
Walking beside him on the frozen
road at the moment, she was say
ing, “Do you think it will last,
Nicky? Do you think you’ll keep
on liking work when the novelty
has worn off?’’
“If I don’t, I’ll come right back
to you for fresh impetus. You’re the
first person who ever made me feel
ashamed of wasting my life.”
"I never meant you to feel that
•way, Nicky. The only reason that
I talked the way I did was because
I think that people who are born
with a responsibility to meet get
the most out of life when they do
meet it. So many people look up
to a man in your position. They de
pend on you to carry on because
when you do, they can be sure of
their bread and butter and a kind
of security they have always
known. I mean that your father
and your grandfather have built up
something upon which hundreds of
people depend for their livelihood.
It’s more than just a company. It’s
the Bartlett company. Understand?”
He grinned at her. “You make
everything clear, Ellen. But I have
a confession to make. I didn’t do it
for any of those reasons. I did it
because I — well, Fab’s been after
me for a long time to go to work
and now—”
AiXCXt: WdB I1U blUUU UVCX LI1C ~ Ull,
but a shadow fell across Ellen's face.
She said, "We'd better walk a lit
tle faster, Nicky. Fab will think
we’ve been lost.”
Fabienne saw them coming over
the hill.
Bill had gone into the “lab” and
came back with a cake of wax. "1
told you you needed a man around
the house, ma’am,” he said, melt
ing it to top the bottles.
"Sometimes I think you’re right,”
she said somberly. “When I have
to chop wood and bring in water
and milk cows, I do find it leaves
me little time for my beauty treat
ments.”
Bill poured the wax over the top
of a jar. “You know, Fab, you
wouldn’t look as funny doing those
things as you think you would.
You’re made up of a lot of quali
ties—”
Nicky and Ellen came into the
kitchen stamping snow from theii
boots, looking rosy-cheeked and
radiant. -
“It’s getting a lot colder,” Nicky
told them. "And the sky looks pretty
gray over in the east."
“We’d better start back early,’
Bill said. “This is no place to gel
caught in a snowstorm. Channing
and I came up here one week-enc
last winter to do a little work. He’s
interested in amateur radio anc
went over to see Willie, a guy whe
has a little ham outfit in Danbury
He couldn’t get back and I couldn’i
get out until the middle of thi
week. The snow piles up fast ir
these hilljg. Had to leave the cai
until snriner.”
“How did you get out?” one o:
them asked.
“Caught a hitch on the state
road.”
“It was so nice when we left New
York, I’d almost forgotten it's sti'i
winter,” Ellen said when they were
on the road home.
"There’s plenty of winter ahead
You notice it more up here where
the last snow doesn’t melt before
more is on top of it."
“Do we take this turn or the one
to the left,” Bill asked Fabienne a
a cross-roads.
"This is the right one,” she tole
him.
“How ejid you figure that out?’
Nicky wanted to know. It was dart
in the back seat of the sedan and
the overhead light was out of com
mission.
"I never forget a road once I’ve
traveled over it.”
‘‘Bet you won't recognize this one
the next time. In the summer, when
the trees are out and the fields
white with daisies, it doesn’t look
like the same place. That's one of
the great charms of New England,”
Bill said.
But Fabienne was to travel over
that road long before the daisies
whitened the fields.
Nick and Bill said their good
nights to the sleepy girls at the
door of the apartment.
In the living room, Eilen and Fa
bienne sprawled in two easy chairs
facing each other, talking of the
day.
‘‘It was grand," Fabienne said,
yawning. “It reminds me of the
sort of thing we do in Maryland.
Nicky and I have often gone off on
horseback to a shooting lodge in
the hihs and cooked our lunch over
a wood fire.”
Ellen could picture the scene:
Fahienne. radiant, dashing in her
riding clothes, going out in the
clear morning, coming back fac
ing a sunset with Nicky, laughing,
easy, happy, sharing things that
were familiar to both. She'd never
been on a horse in her life.
“When we were in high school,
Bill and I used to have summer pic
nics. I remember one day we went
fishing, and cooked the fish in a
frying pan'we bought from a man
on the road. We roasted corn and
potatoes. I never tasted anything
so good.”
What fun, Fabienne thought, to
know how to do things like that.
I wouldn’t have touched a live fish.
Ellen yawned deeply. “I can’t
keep my eyes open.”
" "Neither can I,” Fabienne said
sleepily.
They said good night to each
other and went to bed each to lie
wide awake for hours. Fabienne to
dream of a farmhouse, to see her
self singing in a big, cool kitchen
that smelled of spices, waiting for a
VALENTINES
LOS ANGELES, Feb. 14.—
(/P)—Three Valentines got to
gether in a court room today.
The result was a divorce.
Superior Judge Dudley S.
Valentine granted the decree to
Mrs. Marie Valentine. She tes
tified her husband, Ralph M.
Valentine, had been intoxicated
on practically ever}- pay day
since their marriage, and some
times in between.__
South Magnetic Pole
Shifts Its Position
WASHINGTON, Feb. 14.—CPI
Rear Admiral Richard E. Byrd re
ported from the Antarctic today
that the south magnetic pole ap
parently had shifted its position.
He said in a telegram received
by the navy that observations made
Dn February 7 had led to the be
lief that the pole had moved west
ward from at least three of the
four positions reported since 1909.
Eminent scientists, he noted, are
in virtual agreement that the pole
covers an area of ten or more
miles and appears to shift from
year to year.
CONTRACTS awarded
VANCOUVER, B. C., Feb. 14.—
(Canadian Press)—Clarence Wal
lace, head of Burrard Drydock com
pany, said today his firm had been
awarded contracts in excess of
$3,000,000 for the construction of
four whaler-type sub-chasers and
“some additional naval work.” Wal
lace said between 500 and 600 men
would be employed at the com
pany's plant in North Vancouver.
man whose bulk would fill the door
nay.
In her narrow white bed, Ellen
looked into a picture that came to
life in her imagination and she saw
a gracious dining hail in a Mary
land mansion and the face she saw
across from her own above the
flicker ng tapers was an aging face,
graceful, contented, rich with the
knowledge a life of usefulness had
marked upon it. And it was Nicky’s
face. She sighed and relinquished
tier dream.
(To Be Continued)
| THIS CURIOUS WORLD ™nm

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DAILY CROSSWORD |j
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6. Peels 21. Taut Paul s TnRrBU° MEN
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23. Salt (chem.) _ ., . * menus s Answer
26. Generally I 234 5Z/6 7B9IO
29. Oriental ___ _____ __ ___ AA/ __ _______
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10. Observes 51 _ “““ '// 52 *” ”
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Distributed by King Features Syndicate, Inc. 2*/3 j
OUT OUR.WAY By J. R. Williams
Br—THlMK VERY
WHO HAD JH' RAKE
L) KNOW I fcEVER.
JLESSYOO hAAKE
FHIMK BACK-WHY,
rHS 3IMCE I-I —
AWAY BACK,
JTHS BACK/
" J".f7 WILLIAMS
V^g^aaaa.^ VMV mothers get sravi-n >
OUR BOARDING HOUSE . . with . . . Major Ho^
i.E YOU BLOKES' YOU SOUND LIKE WI'VE GOT
NS FULLA STRAW-M A DUDE IN A f? SPORTING BLO^DWY 1 A‘'T 'i
!RRY POP ?- J|{ CHECKED SUIT % IN me THAN A L0^lY
>W 'eOUT SOME -2m CANVASSING A JY BARN HAS HAY W-7S“*Ts !
CI ABLE_POKER-OO ¥ DAY COACH FOR V BUT MY pocKetF* i“‘“ ~C!Y
■ dic& ? I've sat n2>fishA~^ I'm only ^ keep me in But
ILL SO LONG I FEEI_J> A TOURIST GOING )} THE KIBITZER Y> Y SAv
CE A PRESSED X (ALONG FOR TH&) l BRACKETS l Y > T T^V !
ISV IN A BOOK OF ) ^——RVilEW/—:_-j^R\/VlG£S/
'™ss£y i Bs fMuTT X2tf
AKE'S PAYING
Board, 90 he wa^s
v CONGENIAL work/
>C0TOlg40BYHEASEffVtCg.mC. T. M. Rgc : fc w r./g
LITTLE ORPHAN ANNIE
mgmmmAkff
W WHAT? YOU DON'T WSf|M
1 SAY SO! SURE — THE WW^
I GREEN GANDER. EH? OF \ y
COURSE-EVERYBODY KNOWS £T\
| IT’S OUR FLASHIEST / Mtf
|1 HOT SPOT- _J ./W*
f YES- A LITTLE
I EX-HOODLUM NAMED PETE
B EL PASO RUNS IT-SURE
i WHAT? BRIBERY. GAMBLING.
$ HARBORING CRIMINALS
$ THE WHOLE BOOK. EH? ARE
fi YOU CERTAIN YOU HAVE
1 ENOUGH PROOF?
. ■--|“
r-:
OH! I SEE- THE
PROOF IS ALL ON THE
PREMISES. EH? ITS MY
JOB TO PULL A SURPRISE ...
RAID AT ONCE- ITS BOUND V
TO INCRIMINATE NICK GATT?/
HM-M—WELL, WE WILL f
N^?4v,|-7/
WASH TUBBS Trap Is Right By RoTCrant I
<SIVE IN TO THAT WAL, THAT'S ONE WAY OF LOOWN AT IT?
THIEVING, MURDER | MISTER. ER...'SCUSE ME WHILE I HANG ;
INS OIL CROWD? SOME WASH1N' UP TO DRV y 5
NEVER! >-jy-J \
W? TWO SHIRTS
If ON THE LINE... pEHE
M THAT6 TH‘S«6WM.,Np~p
sf\ BOVS. START /-•££=£#•
MOTOR/ fe;.±v.
NOT AT AIL, CAF'N cA^
JUST A LITTLE SURPRISE
lifer
GASOLINE ALLEY__ Not The Forgotten Mar I
' MISS SNIPE, I PEAUY MEANT '
TO 0PWC SOU A PIECE OP MY
BIPTHRAY CAKE. BUT MV BCURM/I
HOUSE VEtOHSOpS ATE rT M
j^ALl UP.
WEE A MAGICIAN/ 100<! I KEEP 1
WHEfJ€ PIP TOO mOPUCE , IT UNPEK I
A SIC VALENTINE MV SHlET. j§
LINE THAT HK>M? . -
te I mJ'-s<■ A\
I H y^7 I Copyright, 1P40, by Tb» Cnmr> Trta«< a ■
THE GUMPS _ Mamma Turns On The Personality I
/m-mama-i erl-\
Don't think it \
IS ADVISABLE OUST)
novjtder-tell/
any ONE THAT
BABY IS A /
ACDUN’TCSS/-^
Hr NO-MO - B-BUT YOU \
If SEE, BABY'S BATHE R-THE
w Count- is inthe midstob
1 WAR-TORN EUROPE-HE ,
f MlferHT KA'JE POLITICAL. )
1 ENEMIES OMER HERE WHO \ (
§Sl WOULD TRY TO HARM HIS ) i
m DAUGHTER-IN FACT, BABY /
HAS ASKED ME NOT TO J
#^MENTION^RjT^£-^
TOLD "YOU «
BEFORE MOT \
TO WORRY- I'LL
V HANDLE )
\feABY."
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7
Rep. U. S. Pat. OH.:
Copyright. 1540. by The Chicago Tribune. B
BRICK BRADFORD-And the Metal Monster By William Ritt and Clarel^WI
HE'S OUT COLD / BUT WE'LL TAKE NO)
CHANCE ON HIS COMING TO - TM
-V ^
ANpUMnoVERl I U
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THERE/HE'S SAFE ENOUGH - LOCKED IN J
—-r THAT CELL t——-'
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COME ON 7 WE'VE GOT TO GET ioTTTJ I
BLUE'S HANGAR WITHOUT BEING |

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