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The Wilmington morning star. [volume] (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, February 21, 1940, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1940-02-21/ed-1/seq-5/

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IATSON JOHNSON
CONVICTED here
r nH Guilty Of Violating
"lor Laws And Given
jiight-Month Term
Tl - nvon was convicted yes
^-tson •»' 11
jn recorder’s court on a charge
the liquor laws and re
j vi01alll,= |
c‘ v eisht-month term on the
jgjvea an »
Sermon Tyson received six
hs at the county farm on
®°ni 1 0f larceny of two sweat
r^ar-OS
' valued at 79 cents each,
* ” fears. Roebuck, and company
fiCnl or 307 North Front street,
core, al “
Cm^enkins drew two months
,he county farm on charges of
one the liquor laws and re
«jniainjo
‘ an officer.
“tivester Logan, of 1011 Fanning
“■ charged with hit-and-run
'L '* with property damages re
“ ° was fined $50, taxed with
E!1 costs and ordered to make re
•fration ’ of $18-50 to Mrs. Belle
Sr and $30 to W. J. Casteen.
Logan drew a five month term
the county farm in default of
navment of the fine, costs, and re
stitution. The case of Hampton
“ „f 919 Dickinson street.
with hit-and-run driving
'..j property damages resulting,
ms nol prossed with leave.
Rountree Will Speak
At Kiwanis Meeting
"Accelerating the Judicial Proc
!Ss" will be the subject of an ad
JreES by George Rountree, Jr., at
the'luncheon meeting of the Wil
mington Kiwanis club at the Cape
fear hotel today.
He speaks under the auspices of
,he Junior Conference of the Amer
ican Bar association._
ADVERTISttAliiiJNT
CWhy Let Yourself ^
Get Constipated ?
Why endure those dull headachy
days due to constipation, plus the
inevitable trips to the medicine
chest, if you can avoid both by
getting at the cause of the trouble?
If your constipation, like that
of millions, is due to lack of
“bulk” in the diet, the “better
way” is to eat Kellogg’s All-Bran.
This crunchy toasted breakfast
cereal is the ounce of prevention
that's worth a pound of emer
gency relief. It helps you not only
to get regular but to keep regular,
day after day and month after
month, by the pleasantest means
you ever knew.
Eat Kellogg’s All-Bian regu
larly, drink plenty of water, and
see if you don’t forget all about
constipation. Made by Kellogg's
in Battle Creek. If your condition
is chronic, it is wise to consult
a physician.
_J
Help Yourself To Health
By Choosing Right Food
By RUTH CHAMBERS
We are becoming more and
more health-conscious, it seems,
and that is a very good thing.
With our new interest in the sub
ject and the many recent discov
eries in the field of nutrition, we
are being taught more every day
about the close relationship which
exists between the food we eat
and the way we feel and look.
Homemakers were educated long
ago to the importance of the right
food for children. Then women
learned more about the science of
eating when they began experi
ments with diets in their efforts to
acquire or retain a slender figure.
Sometimes these experiments prov
ed harmful to their health. As a
result of the lesson they learned,
the emphasis today is upon sane
diets. Pood fads have gone out of
style. We know now that a varied
and well balanced diet for all mem
bers of the family is heir best pro
tection against many physical ills
and that health is to be won and
kept by following common sense
rules, based on scientific principles.
We’ve come a long way in the
understanding of food values since
the time when we “counted cal
ories,’’ and paid little heed to such
food essentials as minerals, vita
mins and the right proportion of
building and energy foods.
Et Liver and Heart for Iron
One of the important medical dis
coveries has been the value of liver,
with its high iron content, in the
prevention and treatment of nutri
tional anemia. This discovery drew
attention to the food value of other
meat sundries, such as the heart,
kidneys and sweetbreads.
Heart ranks next to liver as a
rich source of iron in the diet and
should therefore be served fre
quently.
The much discussed vitamins
come into the picture, too, <and
heart, liver and kidneys are among
the good sources of the important
vitamin B in its various complexi
ties.
Liver is a source of vitamin A.
I Recent experiments indicate that
the fat of meat is important as a
carrier of important vitamins, in
addition to its value in providing
heat and energy,
Have Diversified Menu
For the sake of your family’s
health, let your menus be as diver
sified and well balanced as you can
make them, with a good supply of
meat, cereals, fresh and cooked
vegetables and fruits and dairy
supplies. And extend your cooking
repertory to include those parts of
the meat animals which are so
rich in food essentials.
Beef Heart
Heart may be cooked in water or
braised. It should be washed tho
roughly in warm water. Some of
the arteries and veins may be cut
away. A savory bread stuffing may
be placed in the cavity in beef
heart. Then it is braised, that is,
cooked like a pot-roast.
To cook it in water cover the
heart with water to which one tea
spoon salt for each quart of water
has been added and cook at a sim
mering temperature until tender.
Beef hearts require about three to
three and one-half hours. Veal,
lamb and pork hearts, which are
much smaller, require about two
and one-half hours.
Beefsteak and Kidney Pie
1 beef kidney
1 1-2 cups water
1 pound round steak
2 tablespoons fat
Salt and pepper
Biscuit dough
Wash kidney, slice and cut into
pieces. Place in a saucepan and
add 1 cup water. Cover and cook
slowly about three-quarters of an
hour, or until tender. Cut steak
into strips and brown in fat. Add
one-half cup water, cover and sim
mer thirty minutes. Combine steak
and kidney. Season. Thicken gravy
with flour mixed with water to
form a smooth paste. Line a bak
ing dish with a biscuit dough. Pour
in cooked meat and gravy. Cover
with additional biscuit dough. Bake
in hot oven (425 degrees F.) about
thirty minutes or until nicely
browned.
G. 0. P. Precinct Meets
Scheduled On March 4
Fred J. Tucker, secretary, an
nounced yesterday that republican
precinct meetings for the purpose
of perfecting precinct organizations
and choosing delegates for the
county convention will be held at
8 o’clock Monday night, March 4,
at the regular polling places.
The republican county convention
for New Hanover will be held at
8 o’clock on Wednesday evening,
March 6, at the county courthouse.
All are invited to attend.
FREIGHTER SINKS
LONDON, Feb. 20. — CP) — The
British motor freighter Fox was
holed and sunk in a collision off
Southampton today with the 64-year
old paddle steamer Lord Elgin, one
of the oldest British craft afloat.
No casualties were reported.
Got a cold? Every swallow seem to scratch your
throat till it’s rough and raw? Get a box of Luden’s.
Let Luden’s special ingredients with cooling menthol
help bring you
quick relief from
itchy, touchy,
“sandpaper
throat!” MM
Copr. 1940, /||«l
Luden’s, Inc. Bgg&l
75<
PINT
$1.35 QT.
r90 PROOF
/own ZSvernF
i- Straight j
1 Rye Whiskey -£j
distilled by g
4 National Distillers {trofturtsdorp, ~g
• _ 90 PROOF
^ ^ATiQNAt,*DISTILLERS PRODUCTS CORP NEW YORK!.
Fort Bragg Scout Troop
Wins In District Rally
FAYETTEVILLE, Feb. 21.—Ths
annual Fayetteville district rally
held here Monday night in the
armory was won by Boy Scout troop
four, of Fort Bragg.
Troop one, of Fayetteville, has
won the honor for the past two
years.
Among the events held were sig
naling, knot-tying, fire by friction,
first aid, tug ’o war and rescue rac
ing.
Following the rally a brief court
of honor was held and a number
of advancements were recognized.
General William Bruden, fort com
mandant, made the awards.
R. J. Divine, area field commis
sioner, and David L. Liles, scout
executive, of Wilmington, took part
in the program.
JAY JUSTICE, TWO
OTHERS ARE FREED
Ernest Saunders, Of Lincoln,
And Horace Lytle, Of
McDowell, Paroled
RALEIGH, Feb. 20— UP)—Thret
men were paroled today by Gover
nor Hoey. They were:
Ernest Sanders, convicted in Lin
coin county in July 1936, of assaull
on a female with attempt to rape anc
sentenced to 10 years; Jay Justice
convicted in New Hanover countj
last May and sentenced to a one
year suspended term for store-break
ing, larceny and receiving was in
voked; and Horace Lytle, sent ui
from McDowell county last montl
to serve 90 days for petit alrceny.
Smith Suit Compromised
In Columbus Civil Court
WHITEVILLE, Feb. 20.—The suit
in which Mrs. E. W. Wooten, oi
Whiteville, was seeking to recovei
damages of Mr. and Mrs. Seth L
Smith i i the death of the plaintiff’s
son, Edgar Wallace Wooten, was
compromised in civil superior court
here today, and Mrs. Wooten was
awarded $5,000 under the terms ol
the settlement.
The case had once been to ths
supreme court, and a new trial was
granted.
The youth died of injuries alleg
edly received in a collision betweer
the bicycle, which he was ridint
and the automobile driven by Mrs
Smith in March, 1936.
CONFERENCE SCHEDULED
RALEIGH, Feb. 20. — UP) — Thi
eighth annual sanitarians’ schoo
conference will begin here tomorrov
night under the sponsorship of thi
state board of health. The conclud
ing session will be held Saturda;
morning.
ADVERTISEMENT
---
Pleasant Wake-Up
For Lagging Insides
Ever troubled by constipation and
its bad breath, headaches, bilious
ness? Then you ought to know
Syrup of Black-Draught, tasty, ef
fective liquid companion to the fa
mous powder laxative. Its action is
usually punctual, gentle, thorough
by simple directions. Its principal
Ingredient helps tone bowel mus
cles. Next time, take Syrup of
Black-Draught. 2 sizes, 50c, 25c,
BRUNSWICK PLANS
LIBRARY PROJECT
Demonstration Service Will Be
Carried Out From March
11 Through May 3
A demonstration library service
is being sponsored by the Bruns
wick County Board of Education.
This demonstration is put on by
Works Projects Administration Li
brary project, showing how a
county may have library extension
service. The library truck or book
mobile will follow a schedule of
stops, worked out by Mrs. Norma
Rowe Sawyer, library supervisor,
and Miss Annie May Woodside,
county superintendent. This sched
ule should make it possible for
any citizen to secure a book with
in a short distance from his home.
A collection of approximately 1,750
books will be lent to schools and
citizens, for a period of one week,
to be renewed or exchanged each
week. This service will be given
the county for a period of eight
weeks, beginning March 11 and run
ning through May 3.
Posters will be posted at each stop,
giving dates and the hour of ar
rival of the WPA bookmobile. Mrs.
Hope P. Durham of Leland, will be
the librarian on the bookmobile, and
will assist in book circulation.
The bookmobile schedule is listed
below', as follows:
Monday—Longwood—Gwen’s store,
9:30—10:15 a. m. Waccamaw High
school—10:30—12:30 a. m. Exum’s
Store—1:15—1:45 p. m. Simmon’s
Store—2:30—3 p. m.
Tuesday—Roach’s Store—9—9:30
a. m. Shallotte Drug Store—100—
10:30 a. m. Shallotte High school—
10:45—12:45. Shallotte village—1—
1:30 P. m. Mrs. John B. Chadwick’s
home. Parker’s Store—1:50—2:30 p.
m. Hickman’s Crossroads—2:45—3:30
P. m.
Wednesday — Mill Creek Baptist
church—8:30—9 a. m. Southport
Public library—9:30—10 a. m. South
port Pligh school—10:15—12:15 p. m.
Ward’s Store—12:45—1:15 p. m. Kir
by’s Store—1:45—2:15 p. m. Supply
school—2:30—3:30 p. m.
Thursday—Maco Baptist church—
8:30—9 a. m. H. O. Peterson’s Store
—9:15—9:45 a. m. Beat Mentz Cor
ner—10:15—10:45 a. m. J. L. Hen
ry’s Store—11—11:30 a. m. Bolivia
school—12—2 p. m.
Friday—Leland High school—9—
11 a. m. Leland Community, Leland
High school library—2—3 p. m.
W&stingtMmse
AD J U ST- 0 - M ATI C
LIGHTER—weighs only 4 pounds.
Saves you tons of needless push
ing.
FASTER—reaches working heat
in a jiffy, maintains it automati
cally. No waiting for heat to
catch up, no plugging in or un
plugging cord.
SAFER—correct heat for every
fabric is automatically main
tained. Cannot overheat. SAVE
$1 — trade in your old iron today
on this truly modern, automatic
iron.
Just dial the correct heat
for any fabric. Accurately
maintained by built-in
thermostat.
PAY ONLY
66c Down
82c Monthly
BRING YOUR OLD IRON WITH YOU!
TIDE WATER POWER CO.
Orton Plantation Will j
Ship Daffodils Soon 1
SOUTHPORT, Feb. 20. — Orton
Plantation win begin the shipment
of daffodils to the northern markets 1
this week. The plantation has about
eight acres in these flowers and the
blooms appear to be a week or two
late, due to the cold wave in Jaan
uary. With the northern sections j
still more or less frozen, the lateness
in beginning shipments this year wiil '
not be noted. And there is no indi- 1
cation that the production of the ;
flowers will be below the average.
Camellia buds were somewhat in
jured by the January cold. These
flowers are blooming fairly strong
now but their beauty and number
will not be up to normal years.
The outlook for the azaleas, early
in March, is splendid. These flowers
had not budded when the cold spells
began to strike early last month.
They have been thriving during the
past two weeks and are promising
a great profusion of blooms of un
usual beauty.
Correction Of Bad Road
Conditions Is Advocated
FAIRMONT, Feb. 20.—m—“Con
centration of resources” is needed
to correct bad road conditions caus
ed by recent weather, A. J. Maxwell,
gubernatorial candidate, said here
tonight in a talk before the Fair
mont Rotary club.
“This worst winter weather in
years is putting the spotlight on the
weakest point in North Carolina’s
socia land economic structures, its
dirt roads, serving important com
munities that become completely im
passible in bad weather," he said.
“Thousands of our rural population
have been cut off from markets,
schools and churches. I have just
learned of one community that re
cently lost 1,600 gallons of milk be
cause of impassable roads. Simi
lar conditions exist in many sections
of the state.”
HEARING SCHEDULED
Raleigh, Feb. 20. — m — The
state utilities commission today con
cluded a hearing into the application
of the Central Carolina Telephone
company of Sioux City, Iowa, for
permission to make some increases
and some decreases in rates of its
Elkin exchange.
NSPECTION MADE
OF SCHOOL RUINS
‘Ians For Rebuilding Jackson
ville Building Will Be
Started Soon
JACKSONVILLE, Feb. 20.—A.
I. Hatsell, Onslow county superin
endent of schools, said here tonight
o definite plans have been made as
et regarding reconstruction of the
high school building, which was de
stroyed by fire Feb. 15.
The insurance adjusters have just
completed their inspection of the
damage, Mr. Hatsell said, and it will
be about ten days before any defi
nite plans are adopted.
Meanwhile, many of the students
in the school are having classes in
a new negro school building recently
completed, while others are holding
classes in churches and other build
ings.
The loss was estimated at $900,000,
of which about $50,000 was covered
by insurance.
Large Still Is Seized
In Brunswick County
Alcohol Tax Unit investigators of
the Treasury department here re
ported yesterday the seizure of a
100-gallon capacity steam still, 3,300
gallons of mash, and 25 gallons
of whiskey Monday afternoon in
Northwest township in Brunswick
county.
The still was in operation at ths
time of the raid, officers said. Sig
nal shots were fired at the approach
of the officers, and the operators of
the still escaped.
BEGINNING THIS MORNING
THIS OFFER! FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY
li /foamy!
PERSONALIZED
SILVERPLATE
Lovely New “CAVALIER” Pattern
4jandiomc Solid. Wood
JOtevent-Tatniih Sfieit $2.29 extra
— ■
S' bstantiol,well balanced, lustrous.* Smooth,
center panel framed with delicate decoration
... a perfect place for your initial! Stamped
free of charge,/
• Mad* by America's**larflest silversmiths
• Knives with mirror finish stainless blades.
• Good weight 18% nickel silver,
• Plated with pur* silver
• AM essential pieces for a complete*servlet.
50 Pc. SERVICE 5
FOR EIGHT
8 S. M. Dinner^Knives^fMirror” Stainless"" Blodttj
8 Dinner Ferkt/* 8 Butter Spreader*
16 Teaspoons \l .Table or ServUp
8 Soup Spoon* Spoon*T |
- - J
_ I
Repeat SALE...
We have been fortunate in securing an additional 1800
pieces for this event!
DOMESTIC DINNER WARE
10®
DON'T MISS IT
10c
EACH PIECE
Odds & Ends Slight Defects
A Most Unusual Sale
Hundreds of pieces attractive dinner ware. Many pieces that will
match, and with only slight defects, some hardly detectable. Just the
type for every day use in the home, and the very thing for your summer
cottage.
THE LOT CONSISTS OF:
CUP & SAUCER, SALAD PLATES CEREAL DISHES
SOLD AS ONE PIECE BREAD & BUTTERS FRUIT DISHES
DINNER PLATES SMALL BOWLS SUGARS
BREAKFAST PLATES SOUP PLATES CREAMERS
ONE TABLE! 260 PIECES
Domestic Dinnerware Priced 19c - 29c - 39c - 48c
The same ware as above, consisting of: Bakers, Covered Dishes,
Platters. Worth double the price.
ON SALE GIFT DEPT. — SECOND FLOOR
(fidk-lirtUiamb Go-,

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