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The Wilmington morning star. (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, February 24, 1940, Image 10

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1940-02-24/ed-1/seq-10/

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GRAY SPEAKS TO
YOUNG DEMOCRATS
fells Them Party Must
Stick To Its Fundamen
tal Principles
CHAPEL HILL, Feb. 23.—
Uordon Gray, Winston-Salem news
paper publisher, in an address here
last night, said" that each time the
democratic party had cracked up
in the past it was "due to some
compromise or deviation from its
fundamental principles.
Gray spoke at a meeting of the
Young Democrats club here. He is
a former state president of the
Young Democrats.
Must Face Trends
"We have to face the present
trends in which our party may he
going away from its cardinal doc
trines of state's rights and sound
money,” the speaker added.
Gray said that “the appeal of the
democratic party lies in its inde
structibility, in the fact that is is
the party of the people against
special privilege and that it has a
heart, and in its history of incor
ruptibility.”
"The republican party,” he said,
“can no more afford to ignore its
liberal minority than the democrats
can ignore their conservative bloc.
There is room for all phases of opin
ion in any party representing all
sections and interests. And any
party with no minority is headed
for destruction. ~~
"The Young Democrats are look
ing to the older democrats for ex
perience, guidance, and leadership.
They in turn can supply enthus.asm,
vigor and militant activity." He ex
pressed the belief that "strong
Young Democratic organizations al
low- us to look forward confidently
to a more glorious democratic and
American future.”
V. S. Must Stay At Peace,
Holt Says At Columbia
COLUMBIA, S. C., Feb. 23—CP)—
Senator Holt (D-W. Va.) said in
an address here last night that
“America must stay at peace and
hold aloft the torch of liberty to
prove to the world that democracy
can solve its problems and that no
government on earth can compare
with democracy as we know it."
Holt spoke at the students forum
at the University of South Carolina.
Saying that he was “glad to join
George Washington in his program
of isolation in order that America
will be preserved," the senator de
clared that the current European
war "or the next one will not settle
the problems that cause such men
as Hitler and Stalin; they are the
results of economic and social con
ditions.”
"To the contrary,” the speaker
continued, "war is the breeding
grounds for dictatorship. War is
the cause of decayed civilization
from which such regimes arise. War
will not stop dictators. War will
cause a condition that cultivates
them. . .
Holt said that "failure to solve
our own economic problems Is an
invitation to discouragement, to de
spair, to war.”
M. Rutledge Rivers, 71,
Succumbs In Charleston
CHARLESTON, Feb. 23—(IP)—M.
Rutledge Rivers, 71, president of
the board of trustees of Charleston
college, died here today of a heart
attack.
Rivers was a former chairman
of the city board of school com
missioners and long active in legal,
educational and fraternal circles.
I SIDE GLANCES
■ '■ —
***•**.<,•** **'■'■*
COPE. IW BY EEA SERVICE. INC. T. M. REO. U. 8- PUT. Off. 2'2i
“You’ll have to dictate this letter again—your apple
chewing registered better than your voice.”
Your U. S.
Income Tax
DEDUCTION FOR BAD DEBTS
Bad debts constitute a consider
able item in the returns of many
taxpayers and may be treated in
one of two ways—either by deduc
tion from gross income in respect
to debts ascertained to be worth
less either in whole or in part and
charged off, or by a deduction of a
reasonable addition to a reserve for
bad debts. Taxpayers were given an
option for 1921 to select either of
the two methods. The method used
in returns for subsequent years un
less permission is granted by the
Commissioner of Internal Revenue
to change to the other method. Ap
plication to change must be made
at least 30 days prior to the close cr
the taxable year for which the
change is to be effective. However,
a taxpayer filing a first return for
1939, may select either of the two
methods, subject to the approval of
the commissioner upon examina
tion of the return. Permission to
adopt the reserve method is limited
to taxpayers having a large num
ber of accounts where credit is ex
tended over a considerable period of
time. It is not granted for the pur
pose of handling one specific debt.
What constitutes a "reasonable
addition’’ to a reserve for bad debts
must be determined in the light of
the facts, and will vary as between
classes of business and with condi
tions of business prosperity. It will
depend primarily upon the total
amount of debts outstanding as of
the close of the taxable year, those
arising currently as well as those
arising in prior taxable years, and
thi total amount of the exisiting
reserve. In case subsequent realiza
tions upon outstanding debts prove
to be more or less than estimated
at the time of the creation of the
existing reserve, the amount of the
excess or inadequacy in the exist
ing reserve should be reflected ,n
the determination of the reasonable
addition necessary in the taxable
'Be&tlaHOH
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this famous Phillips’ Way.
Don’t be a martyr to excess stomach
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quick, take 2 Phillips’ Milk of Mag
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PHILLIPS9
t
Decision in the Strange Case of
“GONE AGAIN—BACK AGAIN—
GII.IGAN” .
(Continued From Page Nine)
“_DEFENDANT!” And
“Gone Again—Back Again—Gili
gan” won against the Slate, in its
futile effort to make him pay the
expense of his recapture. In this
sweeping decision, the Supreme
Court of North Carolina reversed
a previous decision of the lower
court, which sought to make the
prisoner pay the bill. At this time,
the State even took Giligan’s auto
mobile, sold it under a court order
for something over $600 and judg
ment was entered against him for
that amount, minus a personal
property exemption of $500. All
this was reversed in the higher
court’s action.
The court contended that the
State was not in the same category
as a private individual, who had
been compelled to pay out money
because of the wrongful conduct of
another. Giligan’s capture was a
public duty required by law and
while his flight was contrary to the
will of the State, the expenditure
for his recapture was voluntary.
Quoting several excerpts from
the comments of the presiding
judge: “No crime against tne sover
eignty of the State, violates any of
its property rights.” “In point of
legal logic, the defendant’s yen for
the open spaces and his heeding to
the call of the wild, was rather the
occasion than the cause of the
expenditure.”
. This is a true case. Reference of
citation may be had by sending a
stamped, self-addressed envelope
to “Bela Lanan—Court Reporter.”
Starting Next Week
THE STRANGE CASE OF
“TELEGRAM FOR
MR. LAURIE”
Don’t Miss It—Follow It Daily In
This Newspaper.
fjra.d.e~ arlc Registered; U. S. Patent Office.
. World Rights Reserved by Carlile Crutcher.)
RALEIGH
B RIEFS
Star-News Bureau
Sir Walter Hotel
BY HENRY AVERILL
RALEIGH, Feb. 23.—Early indi
cations are that there will this year
be several members of the 1939
house with ambitions to sit in the
state senate for the 1941 session of
the general assembly.
At least three house members are
already in the field for senate posts
—“Sheriff” E. A. Rasberry of
Greene; Lee Wilson of Davidson:
and Ashby Robinson of McDowell.
Rasberry bases his cause on the
fact that his county hasn’t had a
senator in 44 years. Wilson edged
out former Senator Lister Martin,
now a candidate for lieutenant gov
ernor, two years ago in the house
race, and now wants to go up. Rob
inson pulled one of the prize upsets
of legislative primaries in 1938. A
complete novice, as far as previous
experience went, he finished far
ahead of two veteran politicians and
legislators—"Fatty” Giles and W.
W. Neal. He’s an oil dealer and in
the last session opposition to diver
sion of highway funds was legisla
tive hobby.
Going in the opposite direction
there is only one case which has so
far come to your Raleigh reporter's
attention.
Senator J. I. Halstead, of Camden,
is reported to be a house candidate
from that county this year. He serv
ed in the senate in 1937 and 1939,
and the usual procedure in the first
district is to retire gracefully after
a couple of terms, thereby giving
some other county a chance at the
senate seat.
The instances cited are probably
not the only ones of 1939 house men
running for the senate, or vice ver
sa, but they are the only ones which
occur to your reporter at the mo
T iont
Announcement of City Judge Sam
Cathey of Asheville as a candidate
for congress from the eleventh dis
trict confirms a story handled ex
clusively by this bureau some three
months ago.
Your Raleigh reporter feels he is
doing fairly well so far in the gov
ernor’s race. He has already been
charged with being on the pay roll
of two candidates and with being
very much prejudiced against a
third.
When the point is reached that
all six are firmly convinced that
your reporter has done them wrong,
then he will know that the campaign
has been covered with the impar
tiality with which he seeks to cover
it.
If life does, indeed, begin at forty,
then Leroy Martin, Wachovia vice
president and a man as thoroughly
conversant with the political situa
tion as any in the state, started his
on Washington’s birthday — which
was Leroy’s as well.
Say what you please about the
often-cussed publicity man, or press
agent, or whatever you choose to
call him—those candidates for gov
ernor who have already equipped
themselves with press men are get
ting the lion’s share of the early
campaign publicity.
A. J. Maxwell and Lieutenant
Governor W. P. Horton have pub
licity men on the job regularly, and
if you’ll notice the papers, it’s A. J.
Maxwell and Lieutenant Governor
W. P. Horton who are getting most
of the newspaper space.
Paul Grady seems to be doing
right well along that line, too,
though he hasn’t publicly announc
ed the name of his publicity man.
year. A taxpayer using the reserve
method should show in his return
the volume of charge sales (or
other business transactions) for the
year, and the percentage of the re
serve to such amount, the total
amount, of notes and accounts re
ceivable at the beginning and end
of the taxable year, and the total
amount of the debts ascertained to
be worthless and charged against
, the reserve during; the taxable year,
WAR IS NO AID
TO AGRICULTURE
Farmers Of This Nation
Held Not Likely To Gain
From Conflict
RALEIGH, Feb. 23.—W—E. A.
White, assistant director of the cot
ton division of the Commodity Cred
it corporation, told a meeting of
AAA officials ana farmer-commit
teemen from seven states here yes
terday that “agriculture generally
has not profited from the war in
Europe and it is not likely to profit
at any time in the near future.”
“Although the war may have
stimulated exports of cotton,” he
said, “it must be remembered that
the cotton exported has not been
consumed. After stocks of cotton
have been built up in the belligerent
countries not subject to the naval
blockade, a substantial decline in
cotton exports could take place.’’
He said the department of agri
culture planned to start soon a cam
paign to encourage the increased
consumption of cotton. Proposed new
uses include: In house construc
tion, for surfacing of ditches, for
airplane runways, for protection of
drying fruits, to aid in holding soil
on road cuts and grades, and in
plant fumigation.
Behind The Scenes
In Washington
WASHINGTON, Feb. 23.—After
all that has been said about Eng
land’s dire need of American muni
tions, export license figures show
she is cutting down on her pur
chases.
During 1939, Britain took out li
ican m u n itions
(Including air
planes) worth
just less than
$21,000,000.
Actual exports
during the year
ran to $31,000,000
-much of this
presumably, going
on licenses taken
in 1938. Just in
cidentally, licenses
issued to Britain
„_ r .. in TJ6X amounted
Bruce Catton to $26>000i000i or
better than live ard one-half mil
lions above the 1939 figure.
In September and Octoer the
arms embargo was on, and no arms
licenses were issued to Britain. In
Novemer, Britain got $14,000,000
worth of them.
But in Decemer, the total fell to
$66,840—about l-47th of the total is
sued to Finland, which took $3,
150,000, and a much smaller frac
tion of the French Decemer total
of $15,000,000. For the full year,
France got $122,000,000 worth of li
censes.
British purchases of American
staples like cotton, toacco, apples,
and so on, have fallen heavily;
common explanation is that Britain
has only so much cash to spend
in America, and must put it all in
to munitions. So far, however, it
hasn't shown up in the export li
cense tales.
MRS. TAFT PRACTICES
FOR NEW JOB
Ohio's presidential candidate.
Senator Robert A. Taft, is a bit of
a farmer on the side; has 60 acres
near Cincinnati, and grows (among
other things) prize raspberries.
Mrs. Taft is in on it; she raises
prize dahlias, remarks, "Bob takes
care of the farm part—my job is
the flowers." Since dahlias do well
in soil enriched by other crops
you’re apt to find hers all over the
farm; she doesn’t try to keep them
in separate beds.
If abundant energy is a qualifica
tion for the first lady’s job, Mrs.
Taft can pass all of the tests. In
his senatorial campaign last year
she stumped Ohio for him, visiting
all but three counties to organize
republican women.
She has been active in leadership
of the Girl Scouts, . the National
League of Women Voters, the Cin:
cinnati Children’s Hospital, and a
civic group which collected supplies
for the unemployed.
She expects to go right on be
ing busy.
Says: "I see no reason for a
woman to change because her hus
band is President. If she is a home
body she will continue to be one;
if she has been active, she will go
on that way.’
Incidentally, call the Taft home
here when Mrs. Taft is out and
the maid will tell you: “No, I don’t
know when she'll be in. When Mrs.
Taft goes out you never know when
she's coming back.’’
• • *
YOUTH GROUP HURTS
SELF IN CONGRESS
The American Youth Congress
managed to convince practically all
the law-makers here that it really
is a “front’’ outfit. Net result, a
terrific blow to the congress's great
est interest, a program for the re
lief of unemployed youth.
This program is embodied in the
Murray bill, and could have been
presented on a persuasive, non-radi
cal basis—its essentials having been
urged last fall by a commission of
citizens including such conserva
tives as Owen D. Young.
Instead the Youth Congress con
trived to make just about everyone
on “the hill*’ feel that all of the
charges of Communist dominance
are fully justified.
Consequently it will get nowhere,
net, when it goes to bat for the
Murray bill.
During December, 1939, air pas
senger traffic increased 74 per cent
over December, 1938. The figures
for revenue passenger miles were:
65,017,499 for December, 1939, and
37,366,805 for December, 1938. 1
British Planes Bomb
Nazi Ships In Bight
---1
LONDON, Feb. 23—t®—The air
ninistry announced today that Bru
sh planes which scouted Helgoland
3ight Tuesday night and Wednes
lay morning bombed German war
ships and fought off enemy fight
ng planes. , _ .
The Berlin communique of Wed
lesday said that early that morn
n„ “enemy planes from the west
uid northwest” flev. over Helgo
and Bight, strategic waters off the
lorthwest German coast, but men
;ioned nothing of results.
The British that day reported a
successful reconnaissance of Helgo
and Bight by several British
planes.
Today the air ministry stated:
“As already announced Royal Air
Force aircraft were active over
Helgoland Bight during Tuesday
light and the early hours of Wed
lesday.
“Warships observed near Helgo
and (German North Sea naval tor
ress) were attacked with bombs.
Anti-aircraft fire waj encountered
from ships and from shore batteries.
"One of our aircraft reports
having been attacked by three
enemy fighters without success and
it is believed that one of the enemy
fighters was forced down.
"No casualties or damage was
suffered by any of our aircraft dur
ing the operation, but the home
ward journey was made in very
bad weather conditions which ac
counted for failure of one aircraft
to return.”
German pianes resumed forays to
day after the shooting down of two
Nazi planes yesterday in raids on
the pritish east coast. One plane
was reported off Essex today and
another off Norfolk.
Anti-aircraft guns greeted the first
plane, which was reported, although
immediate confirmation, to have been
shot down.
British fighter planes pursued the
second.
A third German bomber flew over
Sunderland on the coast of Durham
so low that witnesses could discern
the swastika painted on it.
In Hollywood
By PAUL HARRISON
NEA Service Staff Correspondent
HOI LYWOOD, Feb. 23.—A good
deal of nonsense is written about
Movietown aviators, and if all the
celebrities who are claimed to be
flyers actually flew, the sky would
look like an approaching blitzkrieg
of locusts.
Aviation is a blessing for press
agents, w n o on
dull days are able
to dream up
items like this:
"In her eagerness
to get to the air
port yesterday,
Mary Marsten
forgot to do her
marketing, and
she had three
guests for dinner.
But it was a
lucky oversight.
When she landed
her plane after PauI Harrison
her second solo
flight, it was discovered that a fat
wild goose had been killed and en
tangled in her landing gear. .
Actually, there are many fewer
flyers than you’d ever guess, and
some of the best ones are those you
hear the least about. Tyrone Power,
Jimmy Stewart, Errol Flynn and
Henry Fonda are the only sure
enough stars who hold licenses of
any sort, and theirs are private
ones. Only competent aviatrix pro
minently identified with movies is
Ruth Chatterton.
* * *
Cummings Has Only
Instructor’s permit
John Trent, former TWA pilot
who owns no ship; Howard Hughes,
millionaire globe-circler who has
six planes, and who now is re-en
tering movie production, and Wal
lace Beery are the only ones hold
ing transport licenses. Robert Cum
mings has the only instructor’s b
cense among prominent Hollywoods
men, and he also is probably the
best and busiest of the competent
all-weather, instrument-using sky
enthusiasts.
Of the first World war flyers in
Hollywood, Paul Lucas seems to be
the only one who keeps up a ship.
Director William Wellman, Dance
Director LeRoy Prinz and Produc
er Walter Wanger fought in t h e
clouds for the allies. As nearly as
they can figure, Wellman and Lu
cas (the latter from Australia) had
an aerial duel in 1918.
Errol Flynn, who gave seasoned
watchers cardiac palpitation every
time he went up, recently sold his
plane because it was too fast and
because the studio raised so much
fuss about it. On his first flight in
it, he made a bellv-whopper landing
with retracted wheels. Buddy Rog
ers also washed out his landing
gear in a maiden hop with a new
ship only the other day.
Clark Gable Plans
To Resume Lessons
Ray Milland has some 400 hours
to his credit, mostly in England.
He and Colin Tapley formerly of
the R. A. F. in New Zealand, have
been brushing up on their flying in
case they’re called to war.
Clark Gable began taking les
sons a couple of years ago and
plans soon to resume them. Tyrone
Power is not qualified to pilot the
heavy amphibian he bought f-»r
trips to the island he leased from
the .tfexicar. government. The place
is a miniature tropical paradise off
southern tip of Lower California.
Directors Clarence Brown and
Henry King have planes and use
them. Brian Aherne, one of the bet
ter amateurs, has just sold his Ught
plane and bought a larger one. Ed
ward Norris has been flying for
years—enough, at least, to keep Ms
private license. Harvey Stephens is
a qualified pilot of powered shij .
but hir real enthusiasm is for glid
ers, and he owns two of t’ em. Cla
rence Brown, who has an airport
on his ranch, holds glider contest
there.
Select Your Son A
New Suit From
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22 So^Front St. Phone 476
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Today Through Monday
SPECIAL SALE
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r
Book Highlights
Herbert Gorman does a fine job of
explaining a strange literary gen
ius in “James Joyce” (Farrar
and Rinehart: $3.50). Gorman
was with Joyce much of the time
during the writing of the book
and had access to his private pa
pers. The book includes many un
published squibs, vers®* and sa
tires composed by Joyce for his
friends. There are also personal
letters that throw new light on
the famed Irish writer. The fol
lowing letter, excerpted from the
book, shows Joyce as a starving
youth in Paris on his 21st birth
day. He had exiled himself from
Dublin to satisfy an intense non
conformism.
Grand Hotel Corneille,
Paris, 2. February, 1903.
Dear Mother,
Your order for 3-4 of Tuesday
last was very welcome as I had
been without food for 42 hours. To
day I am ."0 hours without food.
But these spells of fasting are com
mon with me now and when I get
money I am so damnably hungry
that I eat a fortune (1/—) before
you could say knife. I hope this
new system of living won’t injure
my digestion.
If I had money I could buy a
little oil stove (I have a lamp)
and cook macaroni for myself with
bread when I am hard beat. . . .
I think I am doing the best : can
for myself but it’s pulling the devil
by the tail the greater part of the
time. I expect to be served with my
bill (1/6/0—with oil) any day and
then my happiness is complete.
My condition is so exciting that
I cannot go asleep at night often
until four in the morning and when
I, wake I look at once under the
door to see if there is a letter
from my editors and I asture you
when I see the wooden floor only
morning after morning I sigh and
turn back to sleep off part of the
hunger. . . .
With the utmost stretching your
last order will keep me Monday
midday (postage half a franc prob
ably)—then, I suppose, I must do
another fast. I regret this as-Mon
day and Tuesday are carnival days
and 1 shall be the only one starv
ing in Paris. _
Term Of Office Bill
Due_For^Court f(st
RALEIGH, Feb. 23.—..p,_
preme court has docketed J0 ’
week of March 4 a case to te ’h'
constitutionalitv of a lay „ ’ *
14 w Passed hv
the last legislature increar- '
term of office of the Harnett l!''*
ty register of deeds from twn
four years. 0 to
A number of similar laws
ing registers of deeds in other- Ct'
ties were passed by the 1939 ie - '
lure. The case was brought^!?'
George A. Penny of Harnett court
who tried to file with the '
board of elections for the post M!’
The board refused to accent hi
filing fee. Penny appealed to - *
superior court. Judge Clawson V°<
liams upheld the action of the boa »
Then Penny appealed to the suprl
court. "
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“Member Federal Home Loan Bank*’
C M. BUTLER W. A. FONV1ELLE W. D. JONES
President Sec.*Treas. Asst. Sec.-Treaj,
ROGER MOORE. Vice-Pres. J. O. CARR, Attj.
| C. & S. Grocery!
j 214 So. 17th St. |
= Fresh 01 C |
I EGGS, doz.C* 1 =
"•- I
| Dressed OOC *
I FRYERS, lb. ... OO j
■ MIRACLE WHIP 1QC 1
= Pint . 10 I
I Mkt. Sliced Star 0| q I
| BACON, lb.Li !
| Pocahontas Tom Thumb I
| PEAS, -I 7c |
i No. 2 can. 11 |
! Fancy Fresh PRUNES, I
I No. 2Vi 1 CC l
! Can . ID |
| PHONE 2025 WE DELIVER |
A. AXLER'S
Meat Market and Groceries
909 X. 4th St. Phone 1356
More Food for Less Money!
Friday & Saturday Specials
(with regular order)
FLOUR. 6 lbs.
12 pounds _40c-45c
24 pounds .75c-80c-83c
Compound Lard, lb ..9c
Pure Lard, lb..S!;c
Bucket of Chitterlings .9i)c
FAT BACK, lb .6Hc
RIB MEAT, lb .9>;
PORK LOINS, lb. .15c
PORK CHOPS, lb _16c
Pure Pork Sausage, lb _13c
Fresh HAMS, lb .13c
Smoked Sausage, lb ..15c
BOLOGNA, lb .__12Hcl3c
VEAL, lb -15c-20c-25c
NECK BONES, lb .6>;c
STEW BEEF, 3 lbs .23c
SPARE RIBS, lb .lljic
PIG TAILS, lb .9c
Corned BEEF, can ..lie
SUGAR, 10 lbs .43c
4 tall cans CREAM _2.1c
Good RICE, lb. . 4!;c
3—3c Salt or Matches _10c
3—5c Laundry SOAP ..11c
Chuck or Rib Roast, i 01«
5 to 10 lbs—lb_
Chuck STEAK, lb .12>.c
T-Bone STEAK, lb___18c
Tenderloin STEAK, lb _!»e
Round STEAK, lb _.20c
Rump ROAST, lb . lie
Fresh Country Eggs, doz_20c
(Guaranteed)
PICNICS, lb .13!k
Smoked MEAT, lb .12bc
Phone 1556 ★ We Deliver
———————————>
1 ^ mfft***/*™ i/c/CS —
_ RinSO "ARD Rpg
[<uvu^^washh*^wB WATER 3 for 25c
HOME SERVICE STORES
QUALITY — SERVICE
Sam Berger Says:
"BE PREPARED, EASTER
WILL SOON BE HERE"
Our buyers have scoured the market very care
fully before presenting these extraordinary styles
and values.
MEN'S SUITS $20.00 up
Compare these suits with any similar big selling
suit, and the identical price. You will find these styles
and values are far superior. Dependable and expert
workmanship add to their attractiveness.
;
DRESSES $4.95 up
The new 1940 fashion show, beautiful bolero styles as well
as many silhouette models. Or with flared skirts, some pleats
Spun rayons, crepes, prints and others. Easy terms can be ar
ranged.
f HAIL COUPON0r H
Send only a small down payment with the dress or suit
you desire. Mention color and size.
PRINT NAME.
ADDRESS .APT.
CITY .PHONE.
CREDIT WILL BUY FOR YOU HERE AND NOW, "H'T
TOUR CASH DOES ELSEWHERE. WHY WAIT? Don’t let tb*
lack of ready cash interfere with your plans.
SAM BERGER'S
NORTH FOURTH ST. PHONE ^

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