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The Wilmington morning star. (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, March 26, 1940, Image 9

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1940-03-26/ed-1/seq-9/

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air_transport stocks continue climb in mart
FEW SPECIALTIES
ALSO MAKE GAINS
Snotty Conditions Prevail At
P Close Of The Day’s
Trading, However
NgW YORK, March 25— UP) —A
air transport company stocks
d specialties continued their ris
f jaUnt, in today’s market while
leaders generally moped in slightly
lower territory.
attempts at the start to get the
Hat hack on the upward route met
wjth faint response and prices • 'on
turred irregular. Spotty conditions
prevailed to the close.
V Traders generally kept commit
ments light, brokers said, In view of
Jlacl; developments in the European
’ ar,\he still cloudy business picture
at home and lack of definite opln
ions regarding the domestic political
outlook.
While enthusiasm was lacking for
the majority of industrial issues,
airliner stocks remained in the
popular division as further forecasts
„ere heard of climbing traffic and
earnings for these concerns.
Except for selected shares, ac
tivity was small throughout. Trans
fers totalled 594,990 shares against
518,810 Iasi Thursday. The Associat
fj press average of 60 stocks was
off .i of a point at 49-4, the third
successive drop of a like amount iu
/-nmDOsite.
Loft, holder of a large interest in
PepsiCola Co,, once mote was the
liveliest performer, getting up 1 3-4
to a new high along with American
Airlines, up 2 1-S; Pan-American
Airways, up 7-8 and National Avia
tion. up 1-2. Elsewhere advances
were retained by Sperry, United Air
Unes. Canada Dry, Brunswick
balkc. Briggs Mfg., Sears Roebuck
ami Texas Corp.
On the downside were U. S. Steel,
Bethlehem, General Motors, Chry
sler, U. S. Rubber, Douglas Aircraft,
Lockheed. Curtiss-Wright, Kenne
foil. Western Union, Dow Chemical,
Westinghouse, DuPont and Johns
Manville.
An estimated official drop In this
week's steel mil operating rate war
it. line with predictions st.d not too
depressing market wise. The mag
azine "Steel" sounded a fairly hope
ful note for later Improvement.
In a ragged curb department gains
un in a point or so were posted for
lirewiter Aero, Canadian Colonial
Airways, Master Electric, Phoenix
Securities and Air Investors. Great
Atlant a & Pacific lost 6 and smaller
declines were registered for Pante
pec, American Cyanamld “B" and
Aluminum Ltd. The turnover here
was around 175,000 shares compare^
with 140,000 Thursday.
STOCK AVERAGES
30 15 15 60
Indus Rails Util Stks
Net change _ d.l unch d.l d.l
Monday . 70.9 18.3 38.5 49.4
prey, day ... 71.0 18.3 38.6 49.5
Month ago_ 70.7 18.6 39.2 49.6
1940 high ... 74.2 20.5 40.6 52.2
1949 low_ 69.9 18.0 38.3 49.2
1939 high ... 77.0 23.8 40.6 53.9
1939 low _ 58.8 15.7 33.7 41.6
60-Stock Range Since 1927:
1937-38 1932-36 1927-29
High . 75.3 72.8 157.7
Low . 33.7 16.9 61.8
What Stocks Did
Mon. Sat
Advance! _ 187 198
Declines ..._......... 276 201
Unchanged ___..... 212 177
Total Issues 675 676
CHICAGO POTATOES
CHICAGO, March 25—(A*)—(U. S.
Dept. Agr.)—Potatoes 207, on track
494, total US shipments Saturday
923, Sunday 199; old stock Idaho
Ktissets strong demand good, Colo
rado McClures best good color slight
ly stronger demand moderate, west
ern stock unsettled weak undertone,
demand slow, northern all varieties
steady, demand fair especially Cob
tiers; sacked per cwt. Idaho Russet
Burbanks US No. 1, 2.07 1-2—20;
Colorado McClures US No. 1, 1.80
2,00 according to color; Nebraska
and Wyoming Bliss Triumphs 90 per
tent US No. 1, washed 2.50; Min
nesota Hollandale section Cobblers
i’S commercials l-So-40; Minnesota
and North Dakota Red river valley
section Cobblers 85 per cent US No.
1, few sales 1.40; Bliss Triumphs 80
Per cent US No. 1, 1.25-40; Ear'y
Obios 75-80 per cent US No. 1, 1.16
20; Wisconsin Green Mountains US
K°- 1> 1.60. New stock dull supplies
moderate demand very slow; no
early sales reported.
N. Y. COTTONSEED OIL
N'EW YORK, March 25.—(iP)—
Cottonseed oil futures recovered
Wince today after a mild morning
jKesBlon and closed unchanged to
‘Point higher.
while prices stiffened toward the
ast >n line with action of allied
’ iPlw, most traders waited for Eu
Pean markets to reopen Tuesday
1 c,ie to market action.
■-ales totaled 52 contracts; May
.I}- Jul3’ 6.78b; Sept. «.82b; Oct.
5S°P. (b-Bid.)
^Crude oli was quoted nominally
5 3-4 cents a pound In the south
Ts and valley and 5 1-2 to 5-8 In
tisas. ,
v BUTTER
-NEW YORK, March 25— (if) —
utter 754,076, steady. Creamery,
Jher “'an extra 28 3-4—29 1-2 {
,, W (02 score) 28 1-2; firsts (88-91)
1? lV~88 1'4; seconds (84-87) 26
‘2-77 1-2.
SPOT COTTON
V ORLEANS, March 25.-<5>)
l0,v.ot c°Oon closed quiet 5 points
j ■ Sales 159.
Hi;,0* niiddllng 9.45; middling
’fils' sood niiddllng 11.00; receipts
‘ ■ stock Hi t '
)
Closing Stock Quotations
(By The Associated Press)
j Adams Exp _ 7 1-2
Adams Millis _24 7.8
Air Reduct_” 4g 7.4
Alaska Jun _ g 4.4
A1 hem & Dye ____ 170 70
Alleghany __ 7.3
Allis Chal Mfg_'_"*36 1-8
Am Can —_ 774 7.4
Am Car Fdy___ 24 3.4
Am For Pow____ 7 5.3
Am Pow & Lt_3 7.3
Am Rad & St S_~ . ~~ 8 3-4
Am Smelt & Ref_49
Am Roll Mill_14 1-4
Am Sug Ref_79 7.3
AT&T-- 172
Am Tob B-88 1-4
Anaconda _ 28 1.8
Arm 111-5 5.8
A T & s Fe ___ 21 3-4
At! Ref - 22 3-4
Avlat Corp __ 7
Baldwin _ 14 j-2
B and O___4 3.4
Barnsdall _ 70 7.8
Bendlx Avlat_____34
Beth Stl ---74 1-8
Boeing Airpl ____21 3-4
Borden _ 23 7-8
Borg Warner___ 22
Briggs Mfg _-_____21 1-4
Budd Mfg __ 5 3.4
v-ruil. »» I1CC1 ________________ I)
Burl Mills _......___19 3.4
Bur Add Mach _11
Calumet & Hec _ 6 7-8
Can Dry - 21 1-4
Can Pac - 5 5.8
Caterpil Trac _ 49 i-s
Ches & O _ 39 1.2
C M St P and p pf_3-I6
Chrysler __ 85
Coca Cola __........_120 1-2
Colunj G and E .........._ 5 1-2
Coml Credit _45 3-4
Coml Solv__14 i_g
Com with and Sou___._ 1
Consol Edls _ 31
Con Oil_—...._ 7 3-8
Cont can ___...._46 3.4
Corn Prod _59 1-2
Curtiss Wright _ 10 1-8
Curtiss Wright A _28 1-2
Del Lack & W _ 4 5-8
Doug Aire _ 82 1-4
Dow Chem _ 155 1-2
duPont _ 185 5-8
Eastman Kod _..151 3-4
Elec Auto Lt _ 37 3-4
Firestone _ 19 i-s
Freeport Sul_..._.... 33 5-8
Gen Elec _38 1-4
General Foods _ 47 5-8
General Motors _ 53 5-8
Gillette _ 0 1-4
Glidden _ 17
Goodrich ..._18 1-8
Goodyear _ 22
Graham Paige _ ... 7-8
Gt Nor Ry Pf .. 23 5-8
Hudson Motors _ 5 3-4
Huppmoblle Motors__... 3-4
Illinois Central _ 10 1-2
Int Harvest _ 55 1-4
Int Nick Can _54 1-4
Int Tel and Tel _-..._ 4
Johns Man _............ 69
Kennecott ..._ 35
Kroger Groc _........ 31 1-2
Libby O F G1 _50
Ligg and Myers B__....-10S 3 8
Loews _......._ 35 7 8
Loft _ 34 3-4
--I
Lorilard --.... 24 5.8
Mack Truck -25 1-4
McCrory Stores _ 1_2
Mo K T - 3.4
Mont Ward ....._53 3.4
Murray Corp -1“ 6 3.4
Nash Kelv _ 5 i_2
Nat Biscuit _24 1-8
Nat Cash Beg _14 3.4
Nat Dairy Prod _17 3.8
Nat Dist -25 1-8
Nat Lead_21 1-8
Nat Pow & Lt_ 7 3.4
N Y Central___...__ 15 1.4
No Am Aviat __ 24 1-8
North Am___ 20 3-4
Nor Pac -..." 7 5-8
O'jio Oil —___......_.... 7 3-8
Otis Elev _15 7.3
Pac G & E _..." 34
Pac Mills _13 3.4
Packard _ 3 7.3
Param Pix_ 7 1.3
Penny J C—. 90 3.4
Penn R R _22
Phillips Pet_38 1-4
Pitt Scr & B_ 7
Pub Svc N J _42
Pullman -” 25 5-8
Pure Oil _ 9
Radio _ 6
ieaa k. o - 1 1-8
Rem Rand_ 9 5-8
rep Stl - 19 3-4
Reynolds B _41 3-8
Seal) A L _ 1-4
Sears _*_86 1-8
Shell .Un .11
Socony Vac _11 3-4
Sou Pac _._12
Sou Ry -14 3.4
Sperry _42 1-2
Std Brands_____ 6 7-8
Std Oil Cal _22 ;-4
Std Oil Ind _26
Std Oil N J _43 1-2
Stewart Warner___ 7 5-8
Studebaker _ 10 7-8
Switt -22 1-8
Tex Corp_45 1-2
Tex Gulf Prod__ 3 5-8
Tex Gulf Sul_.....__34
Timken' Det Ax _ 22 7-8
Transamer _ 5 7-8
Trans & West Air _19 5-8
Un Carb _-_ 82 3-4
Unit Alrc _ 47 1-4
Unit Corp _ 2
Unit Drug _ 6 1-4
Unit Fruit _1___79
Unit Gas Imp__ 13 i-8
U S Ind Alco _ 22 3-4
U S Pipe _ 35 1-2
U S Rub -... 33 1-4
U S Steel _55
Vanadium _32 1-2
Va Cara Chem _1 3 1-4
W ..er Piet ire _ 3 3-1
Western Union _22 1-4
West Klee and Mfg_111
Wilson _ 5 1-4
Woolworth _ 40 3-4
Yell T and C _17 1-8
Youngs S . nd T _ 39 1-2
Total sales 594,990.
CURB
Asso G and El A 3-16
Can Marconi _ 1
Cities Service ____ 4 5-8
El Bond and Sh__ 5 3-4
Gulf Oil _35 1-4
CHICAGO UKA1N
CHICAGO, March 25.—(AO—
Spring’s cold weather, overspread
ing most of the grain belt, helped
to lift wheat prices about two cents
a bushel today to the best level In
more than a month.
May wheat reached $1.07, up 1
7-8, and July $1.05 1-4, up 2 cents,
within less than 3 cents of their
mid-December peaks, which stands
as the highest prices recorded here
in more than two years.
Pessimistic crop reports and Eu
ropean war news were among the
buying factors. While the forecast
predicted slowly rising temperatures
in some wheat areas, crop experts
expressed belief that weather is re
tarding plant development. The
Ohio valley had 1-2 to 2 inches of
snow for protection against freezing
temperatures and there was snow
in the spring wheat and rye zones
but Kansas, Texas, Oklahoma and
Nebraska were without covering.
Wheat closed 1 1-2 to 1 7-8 cents
higher than Saturday, May $1.06
3-4 to 7-8, July $1.05 to $1.05 1-8;
com 1-4 to 5-8 up, May 56 7-8 to
57; July 58; oats 3-8 to 1-2 higher;
rye 1 1-8 to 1 1-4 up and lard un
changed to 2 higher.
Selling partly representing hedges
against loan wheat and profit tak
ing caused frequent price reactions.
The 12 principal terminals received
1,028,000 bushels, almost 300,000
more than a week ago and 400,000
more than a year ago. Moisture
was iorecast iui iw
area but none was in sight in the
winter wheat zone where dust
storms were reported.
In both the Kansas City and Min
neapolis markets mills reported buy
ing May wheat in exchange for de
ferred contracts. At Minneapolis
loan wheat sales were small.
Open High Low Close
WHEAT:
M,v _105% 107 106% 106%
July _105% 105% 103% 105%
Sept I_103 104% 102% 104%
May11!!!._56% 57. 56% 57
Ju“y _57% 58 57% 58
Sept _ 58 58% 58 58%
MavTS: - 41% 41% 41% 41%
TulV " - 36% 36% 36% 36% ;
Sept 33% 33% 33% 33%
^SOT BEANS: m n2 n2W
July HI_108% 110 108% 109%
... 68 68% 67% 68%
jXy ".68% 70 68% 69%
:::_69% 70% 69% 70%
LARD: _ __ 5.72 j
“ -T.ri 5.85 5.77 6.82
May - 6,05 6.00 6.05
July - l 6.27 6.20 6.22 !
OCt -""I" «-27 6 35 6,27 8‘S2 *
BELLIES: __ g .55
May - 6.27
July .
CHICAGO LARD J
CHICAGO, March 23.—<-T> [
I tierces 5.77; loos* 4.87; bellies 5..a. <
FOREIGN EXCHANGE
NEW YORK, March 25.—<£>>—
rhe free British pound tumbled 2
3-4 cents today to the lowest price
since England went off the gold
standard in 1931.
The drop coincided with the ef
'ective date of British foreign ex
change regulations announced sev
eral weeks.
Since England restricted uses to
ivhich the free pound may be put,
iemand has steadily contracted.
(The free pound may not be used
:r pay for such Empire-produced
joods as tin, rubber and jute.)
While the break in sterling has
ipparently been the result of an
idjustment necessary to get in line
with current supply and demand,
noney dealers said, the market has
tlso been unusually sensitive to
ouying and selling orders.
Closing rates follow (Great Brit
ain in dollars; others in cents):
Great Britain, demand 3.67 1-2,
cables 3.68 1-3, 60-day bills 3.66 1-2,
30-day bills 3.65 1-2; Belgium 17.04,
Denmark 19.33, Finland 1.80n.
France 2.09, Germany 40.25n (benev
olent 16.90, travel unquoted), Greece
70 l-2n, Hungary 17.65n, Italy 5.05,
Netherlands 53.11, Norway 22.73,
Portugal 3.62n, Rumania .55n,
Sweden 23.83, Switzerland 22.43,
Jugoslavia 2.35n, Argentina official
39.77, free 23.60, Brazil official 6.05.
free 9.18.
DRY GOODS
NEW YORK, March 25— (.PI —
Business in gray goods was active
today with sales of print cloths and
related Items aggregating about 3,
000,000 yards.
Some of the sales were believed
to have been taken at slight price
concessions.
Feature of the rayon market was
broad movement in 40 1-2 inch pig
ment taffeta. Spot delivery goods
commanded premiums and forward
shipments as far ahead as May and
iune were booked.
Aside from a few orders for silk
sheers and all-silk dye prints, turn
ever was small in the silk market.
Business in woolen goods *
i g h t. Manufacturing operations
vere expected to be maintained at
iresent level for the next few weeks
lowever, with an increase in sight as
'all production gets underway.
N. O. COTTONSEED OIL
NEW ORLEANS, March 25.—(AV
-Cottonseed oil closed steady;
deachable prime summer yellow
.27 asked. Prime crude 5.62 1-2 to
.75 nom; March 6.17b; May 6,25b;
uly 6.30b; Sept. 6.32b; Oct. 6.31b
b—Bid.
PEANUTS
SUFFOLK, Va„ March 25.—(.P»—
’eanut quotations: Jumbos 3 7-S
o 4; buch 3 1-2 to 3.60: runners
3-8 to 3 1-2. Market quiet.
j ;
TREND IS HIGHER
IN BOND MARKET
Numerous Low-Yield Corpor
porate Loans Are Firm
In Light Dealings
NEW YORK, March 25— <iP> —
Excepting a spill in some inactive
foreign dollar issues the trend was
generally higher in today’s bond
market.
U. S. governments were scarce
when buyers appeared for limited
quantities ot treasury maturities and
prices were bid up as much as 1-2
point in one case before the order
was filled. News dispatches from
Washingtoi telling of higher income
tax collections than government of
ficials had expected, strengthening
the belief held in some quarters that
the $45,000,000,000 government debt
limit would escape upward revision
for the time being, aroused interest
in investment circles.
Low-yield corporate loans likewise
were firm in light dealings. Ahead
fractions to around a point were
Pennsylvania General 4 l-2s at 1021
7-8, Remington-Rand 4 l-4s at ICO.
Standard Oil of N. J. 2 3-4s at 105
1-2 and Youngstown Sheet & Tube
Grs at 105 1-2.
Edging ahead elsewhere were a
large assortment of corporate loans
including Missouri Pacific 5s, Nickel
Plate 4 l-2s, Portland General Elec
tric 4 l-2s, Western Union 5s, Rock
Island 4s and International Paper 5s.
Losers of a point or more in the
foreign group included Uruguay 6s,
Lrisbane 5s, Norway 4s and Can
ada 3s.
Sales of $5,160,400. par value, com
pared With $4,443,175 last Thursday.
BOND AVERAGES
20 10 10 10
Rails Indus Util For
Net change _ unch a.l unch d.4
Monday _ 57.1 102.4 96.5 52.3
Prev. day ... 57.1 102.3 96.5 52.7
Month ago .. 56.9 102.4 96.5 50.5
Year ago ... 61.6 100.4 94.8 61.2
1940 high ... 59.9 102.6 96.8 53.5
1940 low _ 56.6 101.9 96.1 49.9
1939 high ... 64.9 102.0 97.5 64.0
1939 low _ 53.4 95.8 90.4 41.7
10 Low Yield Bonds
Monday -112.3
Prev. day _112.2
Month ago _112.1
Year ago _111.4
1940 high __ 112.6
1940 low _111.5
1939 high__ 112.0
1939 low . 103.6
NEW YORK COTTON
NEW YORK, March 25—(7P1—
Old and new crop deliveries struck
out on divergent price paths in the
cotton market today. The former
lost 4 to 6 points but the new gain
ed 1 to 2.
The entire list stumbled at the
start on reports Great Britain had
decided to buy more cotton in South
America, which would presumably
cut into U. S. foreign sales.
Continued talk among traders of
an export subsidy on the 1940-1941
crop, however, encouraged specu
lative demand for deferred deliver
ies. This was backed up by belief
among market men that the Brit
ish policy might stimulate official
action on subsidy payments for
overseas sales in order to maintain
the competitive position of the do
mestic fiber.
Exports Saturday 9,664 bales; sea
son so far 5,318,119. Port receipts
17,298; port stocks 2,936,926.
Range follows:
Range follows:
New—
upen nign l ,ow c,iose
May 10.67 10.67 10.67 10.67 oft «
July .. 10.47 10.47 10.45 10.45 off 6
Oct _ 9.85 9.82 9.85 9.91 up 1
Dec 9.74 9.79 9.73 9.78 upi
Jan .. 9.65 9.74 9.69 9.74 up 2
Mch __ 9.60 9.60 9.59 9.60 up 1
Old:
May „ 10.53 10.57 10.52 10.54 off 5
July .. 10.34 10.35 10.32 10.33 off 4
Spot nominal; middling (%-inch)
10.79.
NEW YORK SUGAR
NEW YORK, March 25— (.'PI —
Offerings of domestic sugar futures
increased a little near the close to
day, cutting into early price gains
and ’moving final levels 1 point low
er to 2 higher.
Cuban producers bought and trade
interests covered but inertia had ap
parently overcome speculative forces
and prices were easily swayed. Sales
totaled 10,400 tons.
The world list ended 1-2 to 2 points
higher on turnover of 1,700 tons;
May 1.56 1-2, Sep. 1.52 1-2. Limited
supply came from trade sources.
Offerings of raw sugar broadened
considerably but no business was
done. Cubas were priced nominal
ly at 2.85 cents a pound, duty-paid,
for prompt shipment.
Highlight of the refined market
was the report the British control
board had inquired in several Latin
American countries for possible sup
plies of the staples.
Refined moved locally at 4.50
cents.
No. 3 range follows:
High Low Closo
May . 1.92 1.91 1.91
July _ 1.98 1.97 1.97
Sep. - 2.04 2.03 2.02b
Jan. - 2.04 2.03 2.04
March _ 2.07 2-07 2.07
NEW ORLEANS COTTON
NEW ORLEANS, March 25.—<2P> '
—Cotton futures traded irregularly
here today. Distant positions were 1
supported by cold weather in the 1
belt while reports that Great Brit- i
ain might curtail imports of cotton :
from this country to conserve for i
eign exchange encouraged selling in ]
the near months. Closing prices
were steady net 4 points lower.
Open High Low Close
May — 10.63 10.6G 10.61 10.65 off 4
July 10.44 10.46 10.41 10 44 off 4 '
Oct ... 9 90 9.97 9.90 9.95B 1
Dec — 9.76 9.79 9.76 9.S1B c
Jan .. 9.G9B. 9.75B f
Mfh .. 9.5SB_ 9.63B f
----, _+■
Closing Bond Quotations |
(By The Associated Press)
GOVERNMENT BONDS
Treasury
I'/is 41 -... 104.19
!%s 47-43 _ 109.2ft
S'/is 45l43 - 109.27
!%s 46-44 - 110.1?
Is 54-44 __ 114.28
!%s 47-45 - 109.19
!s 50-48 - 104.7
!%s 53-49 _106.17
!94s 54-51 - 108.11
!%s 60-55 _108.28
!%s 59-56 _-_107.24
:%s 63-58 _107.17
2%s 65-60 ...107.J 6
Federal Farm Mtg.
3s 4944 _ 108.14
Home Owners Loan
3s 52-44 ___108
L%s 47-45 _-_102.3
DOMESTIC
A.T and SF 4s 95 _105
B and o Cvt 4%s 60_ 13%
Bk-i Un El 1st 5s 50_101%
2an Pac 4s Perp_ 68
2 and O 4%s 92 _122%
2 B and Q 4%s 77 .. 83%
2hi E III 5s 51 -__ 16%
2hi Gt West 4s 59 .__ 27

Cri and p Rfg 4s 34__ 6%
Clev Un Term 4%s 77C_ 69
Erie Rf os 67 __ 16%
Fla East Cst 5s 74_ 6%
Hud Coal 5s 62A _ 32%
Hud and Man Rfg 5s 57 47%
Int Mer Mar 6s 41 __ 67
L. and N 4%s 2003 .. 92%
M K and T Adj 5s 67_ 5%
Mo Pac Gen 4s 75 _ 3%
NYC Rf 's 2013 _ 58
N and W 4s 96 _124%
Nor Pac 6s 2047 _ 54%
Penn rr Gen 4%s 65_102%
Purity Bak 5s 48 _104%
SAL Con 6s 45 _ 6%
So Pac Rfg 4s 55 _ 57%
So Ry Cn 5s 94 _ 87%
So Ry Gen 4s 56__. 54%
Third Ave 4s 60 __ 59
West Md 4s 52 ..- 83%
FOREIGN
Australia 5s 55 _.___ 80
Belgium 7s 55 _107%
Brazil 6%s 26-57 _ 16%
Ger Govt 7s 49 _ 3 5
Italy 7s 51 _ 66
Japan 6%s 54 _ 87
Orient Dev 5%s 58_ 56%
Rio Gr Do Sul 6s 68_ 10%
CHICAGO LIVESTOCK
CHICAGO, March 25— (JP) —Hog
prices advanced 5 to 15 cents today,
topping at $5.55, paid for 190 to 225
pound averages.
(U. S. Dept. Agr.)—Salable hogs
12,000; total 21,000; market closing
5-15 higher than Friday’s average;
butchers scaling 240 lbs. up in fairly
broad demand showing most gains;
lighter weights having least upturn;
good to choice 18-240 lbs. 5.35-55; top
5.65; 240-270 lbs. 5.20-50; 270-330 lbs.
5.00- 25; heavier butchers downward
to 4.75 and below; good 400-550 lbs.
packing sows 4.25-70; few lights up
to 4.85; shippers 1,500; estimated
holdover 1,000.
Salable cattle 12,000; salable calves
I, 000; choice fed steers slow, steady,
all othejs weak to 25 lower mostly
10-15 down; general market slow
; potty but even limited shipper de
mand ascribed bulk steers and year
lings of value to sell at 10.50 up
ward ; yearlings comparatively
scarce most fed steers and yearlings
8-25-10.50; extreme top 12.00 on long
yearlings next highest price 11.75;
not much here of values to sell above
II. 00; numerous loads however at
10.00- 75; best Wyoming fed 1,444 lbs
steers 11.00; weighty Colorados
10.75; heifers steady to weak; best
weighty Colorado fed offerings 10.25
V.IO, cuws We<tK LO 10
lower cutters at 5.50 down; most
beef cows 5.85-6.75; bulls strong;
practical outside weighty sausage
bulls 7 00; vealers steady at 10-50
down; stock cattle steady mostly
8.75 down to 7.50; with light year
lings and calves at 9.50 up to 10.50
and better; calves reaching 10.65.
Salable sheep 10,000; total 12,50 ;
fat lambs slow 15-25 higher than
Friday; best fed range, wooled lambs
10.65; bulk 10.50-65-; only few under
10.60; fat sheep steady; handy
weight fed range ewes 5.25; small
lots fat natives 6-00 down.
BALTIMORE POTATOES
BALTIMORE, March 25— Cff>) —
Potatoes—(old)—dull. Truck: 100 lb.
sacks Md., Pa., Round Whites 1-60
75; Chippewas and Katahdins 1.75
90, few higher. N. Y. Round Whites
1.60-70. Rail: 100 lb. sacks U. S. Is
Maine mountains 1.85-2.00, few high
er; Chippewas and Katahdins 1.90
2.15, few higher. Idaho Russet Bur
banks 2.25-40. Neb. 100 lb. sacks
Bliss Triumphs U. S. Is 2.40, few
higher; 50 lb. sacks 1-80-85. (New)
Very dull. Fla. rails: bu. crates
Bliss Triumphs U. S. Is 2.35-40; U.
S. 2s 2.10-15; bu, baskets Bliss Tri
umphs U. S. Is 2-25-35; U. S. 2s 1.90
2.00.
Sweet potatoes—steady. Eastern
Shore Md., bu. baskets Goldens and
Jerseys U. S. Is 1.00-25; ungraded
75-90; Puerto Ricans, Nancy Halls
and White Yams U. S. Is 85-1.00,
few higher; ungraded 60-75. N. C.
bu. baskets Puerto Ricans U. S. Is
90-1.00, fine quality higher; ungrad
ed 60-75. Nearby bu. hampers and
bus. baskets Jerseys and Goldens U
S. Is 90-1.00, few higher, ungraded
65-75.
CASH GRAIN
CHICAGO, March 25— CP) —Cash
wheat No. S hard 1.08; sample grade
hard 1.05 3-4; No. 2 yellow hard 1.08
1.08 3-4: No. 1 mixed durum 1.01 1-2;
sample grade mived (tough) 1.00 1-2.
Corn No. 3 mixed 65 1-2; No. 4,
63; No. 1 yellow 59; No. 2, 58 1-4—
60; No. 3, 58-59.
Oats No. 2 white 44—44 1-2; No.
3, 43—43 1-2; No. 4, 41—42 1-2;
sample grade 38 1-4—40.
Rye, sample grade 60.
Buckwheat No. 2, 1.50-1.55 nom.
Soy beans No. 3 yellow 1.13 1-4;
No. 4, 1.11 3-4.
Barley, malting 53—64 nom; feed
40—50 nom; Nr. 2 malting 62; No.
5, 62.
Field seeds per 100 lbs. nominal:
timothy 4.90-5.25; sweet clover 4.50
3.25; red clover 12.50-15.00; red top
3.50-9.00; alsike 15.00-18.00; alfalfa
18.00-23.00.
SALES GAIN
LANSING, Mich., March 25.—CP)
—Sales of Oldsmobile automobiles
Torn Jan. 1 to March 20 inclusive
otaled 36,472 compared with 26,680
■ars sold in the corresponding pe
riod of 1939, D. E. Ralston, general
nanager of the Oldsmobile division
>f General Motors, announced to
lay. Sales for the second ten-day
>eriod of March were 5,968 cars,
:ompared with 3,999 in the same
leriod a year ago.
MIDDLING COTTON
NEW ORLEANS, March 25—W
-The average price of middling 15
6ths-inch cotton today at ten south
rn spot markets was 4 points low
r at 10.50 cents a pound; average
or the last 30 market days 10.73.
I
STOCKS IN THE SPOTLIGHT
NEW YORK, March 25. — <TP> —
Sales closing price and net change
of the fifteen most active stocks
today;
Loft, 47,400—34%; al%.
Pan Am Airw, 32,900—22%; a%.
Unit Air L, 30,500—20%; a%.
Radio, 19,800—6; d%.
Nat Avia. 16,400—14%; a%.
Curtiss-Wright, 12,400—10%; d%.
Aviation Coro, 12,100—7; d%.
Man Ry Mod Gtd Ct, 9,100—16%;
no.
Trans and West Air, 8,000—19%;
a Gobel, 7,800—3%; a%.
US Steel, 5,900—55; d%.
Am Airlines, 5,800—64%; a2%.
Crown Cork, 5,500—35%: al.
Bendix Aviat, 5,300—34; no.
Int Nickel, 5,300—34%; d%.
NAVAL STORES
SAVANNAH, March 25.—(TP)—
Turpentne firm, 30 1-2 to 31 1-4; of
ferings 119, all sold ; receipts 17;
shipments 776; stock 11,432. Rosin
firm; offerings 407, all sold; re
ceipts 395; shipments 2,849; stock
173,364.
Quote: B 4.75 to 90; D 4.80 to
95; E 5.10; F 5.25 to 40; G 5.47 1-2;
H 5.50; I 5.55; K 5.57 1-2; M 5.60;
N 5.62 1-2; WG 5.65; WW, X 6.20.
NEW YORK POTATOES
NEW YORK, March 25.—<30—
Potatoes slightly stronger for old
crop. No. 1, 100-lb. sack, upstate,
Chippewa, brushed 2.15 to 25. Long
Island, Green mountain (south sid )
best 2.30 to 35; (north side) 1.85
to 2.15. Maine, Green mountain,
mostly 2.00 to 2.05; Chippewa and
katahdin 2.10 to 15. New crop: Flor
ida, red bliss, bushel crate or box
2.00 to 2.25.
BALTIMORE HOGS
BALTIMORE, March 25.—(30—
(U. S. Dept. Agr.)—Hogs 2,000.
Ste'ady; practical top 6.00.’Good and
choice 170 to 210 lbs 5.75 to 6.00;
220 to 240 lbs. 5.50 to 75; 250 to
300 lbs. 5.00 to 50; 150 to 160 lbs.
5.45 to 70; 140 to 150 lbs. 5.25 to
50; 130 to 140 lbs. 5.00 to 25; 120
to 130 lbs. 4.85 to 5.10. Packing
sows 4.00 to 50.
EGGS
NEW YORK, March 25— (30 —
Eggs 25,010; weak. Mixed colors:
fancy to extra fancy 18 3-4—20 1-4;
extras 18 1-2; storage packed firsts
18; graded firsts 17 1-2; current re
ceipts 16 1-4; mediums 16 1-4; dirties
No. 1, 15 3-4; average checks 14
1-4—3-4.
CHICAGO BUTTER
CHICAGO, March 25.—(30—But
ter 643,204, steady; creamery-93
score, 28 1-2; 92, 28; 91, 27 3-4; 90,
27 3-4; 89, 27 1-2; 88, 27; 90, cen
tralized carlots, 27 3-4 to 28. Eggs
32,949; steady; fresh graded, extra
firsts local 16 1-2, cars 16 3-4; firsts
local 16 1-4 cars 16 1-2; current re
ceipts 14 3-4; storage packed firsts
17 1-4; extras 17 1-2; dirties 14;
checks 13.
A
SIDE GLANCES
[^&^^j^VWEASERy,CE,me, tm.-reo.u.8.p«r.afr I
“That’s why our phone bill is so high—every minute my .1
back is turned your son plays business manl’*^
Southern Senators Prepared
To Battle Anti-Lynching Bill
WASHINGTON, March 25.—VP)—
No sooner had the senate judiciary
committee sent anti-lynching legis
lation to the senate floor today than
southern senators served noti-./
they would do their best to talk the
measure to death.
“If my wind holds out, there are
two bills that are not going to pass
this session—anti-lynching and suf
frage for the District of Columbia,”
Senator Bilbo (D Miss) told reporters.
Another, Senator Connally (D
Texas), who led the forces which
prevented senate passage of an anti
lynch bill jn 1938, declared Finland’s
famed Mannerheim Line would be
nothing compared to the resistance
the pending legislation would en
counter.
Senator Van Nuys (D-Ind), spon
sor of the bill to provide fines and
imprisonment for local officers who
permit lynchings and to make local
governments liable for damages to
lynch victims or their relatives,
agreed that the proposal was threat
ened with “the same trouble we had
before—a filibuster.”
“If we can ever get the bill to a
vote it will pass; there is no ques
tion about that,” Van Nuys said in
an interview.
The anti-lynching legislation,
which already has been approved by
the house, was o. k.’d 11 tc 4 by
the senate committee. Eight demo
crats joined three republicans in
support of it: Chairman Ashurst (D
Ariz), Neely (D-W Va), McCarran (D
Nev), Van Nuys, Hatch (D-NM),
Burke (D-Neb), O'Mahoney (D-Wyo),
Hughes, (D-Del) and Austin (R-Vt),
Wiley (R-Wis) and Taft (R-Oliio).
Four democrats voted against the
bill: Senators Connally, Pittman ID
Nev.), Chandler (D-KY), and Miller
(D-Ark). Taft's and Pittman’s votes
were cast after the committee's
meeting, under a committee rule
permitting such procedure.
James Venable Faulk
Funeral Services Held
FAIRMONT, March 25—Funeral
ser.'ices for James Venable Faulk,
66, retired farmer, who died yes
terday at his home in McDonald
after a short illness, were held at
3 o’clock this afternoon fiom the
late residence. Burial followed in
East Side cemetery here.
Survivors are: his wife; four sons,
W. H., Mack, D. C., and "Alva
Faulk; one daughter, Mrs. Freda
Brown; four sisters, Mrs. Swannie
Faulk, Mrs. Ila McLelland, Mrs.
Dora Ward, of Wilmington, fand
Mrs. G. M. Faulk; one brother, Vol
Faulk.
ADVOCATES WAR
BOSTON, March 25— </P> —War
against Russia would be declared
immediately by the Allies should the
Soviet move against another Eu
ropean neutral, the French ambas
sador to the United States, Count
Rene Doynel De Saint-Quentln- said
during an interview today.
When used according to directions
indicated on each package, we
think you'll agree that "BC" works
fast and relieves in a hurry. Also
relieves headaches, muscular
aches and functional periodic
pains. Consult a physician when
pains persist or recur frequently.
1 HEAR
I DR. J. FRANK NORRIS
I Pastor First Baptist Church, Fort Worth, Texas and
S Temple Baptist Church, Detroit, Michigan
I WEDNESDAY, MARCH 27th
I AT
1 TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
I «TH AND ANN STREETS
I 10 A. M. and 3:30 P. M.
I NEW HANOVER HIGH SCHOOL 8 P. M.
H Moving pictures of world conditions made during recent tour will be
jfl shown at the High School.
■ c Pr* Norris is pastor of the two largest, churches in America and they hare the tw o largest
■ Sunday schools in the world—the aggregate church membership is 17,000.
I j THE PUBLIC IS CORDIALLY INVITED I
| DON'T MISS HEARING HIM! -
. •

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