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The Wilmington morning star. [volume] (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, April 08, 1940, Image 3

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DR braunstein
WILL TALK HERE
writer And World Traveler
To Speak In Behalf Of
Jewish Appeal April 14
Baruch Bra nstein, writer,
A,;.,,,- and world traveler, will
eC»k at the Jewish Social Center
"" Sunday night, April 14, at 8
°n]ock in behalf of the United Jew
jfh Appeal for Refugees and Over
seas Needs.
Tbe united Jewish Appeal for
Refugees and Overseas Needs, rep
seiuing the combined efforts of
f. ( joint distribution committee,
,i United Palestine appeal and the
National Refugee service, Inc., Is
devoted to the three-fold task of
■ lief and reconstruction in Europe,
f initiation and resettlement in
’ l,stine, and refugee adjustment
jn the United States.
Bom in Pennsylvania, Dr. Braun
ttein received his education at
Adelbert college of Western Reserve
university. Ohio State university,
Jewish Institute of Religion and
Columbia university, from which he
received a degree of Ph. D.
He served for five years as a
member of the staff of Columbia
university and was a member of the
executive staff of the Emergency
peace campaign. He has directed
"The World Affairs Forum of the
ijr;' a weekly radio broadcast of
international events and interviews.
\ lecturer and writer on travel,
historical and literary subjects, he
has appeared on public platforms
throughout the United States and
hlurope and was a special lecturer
a, tiie American university of
Beirut, in Beirut, Syria.
His writings have appeared in
"The New York Times,” "Travel
■Masazin - ” "Christian Education,”
•Religious Education,” "Vital
Speeches of the Day,” “The Church
man,” "The London Jewish Chron
icle.” "The B'nai B'rith Maga
zine,” and in other newspapers and
magazines here and abroad.
> He is the author of “The Chuetas
of Majorca,” a history of the out
cast people of that Spanish island,
acclaimed as a classic in its field.
Be is a member of numerous liter
ary and scientific organizations and
is’a fellow of the National Council
on Religion in Higher Education.
MAN IS ARRESTED
ON FIRE CHARGES
(Continued From Page One)
fire near Hampstead was reported
nearly under control.
One blaze was eating its way
through the Padget section of Ons
low county last night and during
the last few days fires have been
reported in the vicinities of Swans
boro, Lloyd’s Meadow, Richlands, the
State college property and near the
Southern Kraft Paper company
property.
The fire wardens attributed the
large number of forest conflagra
tions to the dry condition of the
woods and to the brisk winds. The
flames are carried from one tree to
another by the heavy undergrowth
of dry grass.
Fire Warden Dawson Jones said
last night the fighters there have not
yet turned in detailed reports hut
most of the flames were extinguish
ed with a destruction of something
Eles than 5,000 acres of timber.
Several of the blazes were started
ly farmers burning of land, burning
stumps and other areas. One area
of 600 acres was destroyed through
carelessness by a farmer who, w-hile
burning a stump, allowed the flames
to get away from him.
NO OPPOSITION TO
CENSUS QUESTIONS
NOTED IN SECTION
(Continued From Page One)
forts on the people travelling the
roads, railways and airways.
At every tourist home, hostelry
and hotel they will leave blanks to
be filled in by the transients.
Each blank will be returned to
!'le enumeration district in which it
belongs and will be added to the
names of people resident within the
district.
In this way, census officials have
pointed out, the decennial count will
show not only the number of people
hi each enumeration district who are
home during the enumeration pe
riod, but will also show the number
°f People in each district who re
ride in the district but are on the
move during the two-week counting
Period.
PRESSURE BOOSTED
ON SCANDINAVIANS
(Continued From Page One)
Pursuit and bombing planes in the
United States within the next few
Weeks.
indication that the flood of de
mands from both the Allies and Ger
many were forcing Norway and
o'veden to take a firmer stand was
in the gloomy statement by
Norwegian Foreign Minister Halv
an Noht In parliament yesterday
tlat any attempt by the Allies to
a'op free Norwegian shipping to
'U'rnany would force Norway into
War.
M ‘th increasing frequency and
moefulness, influential Norwegian
sources have termed a defensive al
liance as the only means by which
small northern countries can
H.l!, 'vilh tlle situation with any
1 ar(ie of success.
ambassador named
■ iOSCOW, April 7.—(IP)—Appoint
o£ Ivan s. Zotoff as Soviet
lishSlaS minister to Helsinki, estab
. nlnS diplomatic relations again
Rowing theft' rupture last Novem
,Was announced today by Tass,
■ c*al Russian news agency.
Will Speak Here
PR, BARUCH BRAITNSTEIN
ADAMS PROPOSES
BORROWING TO
MEET SPENDING
(Continued From Page One)
the budget, but might necessi
tate a later supplemental ap
propriation.
Adams said he thought that
congress had “an obligation to
decently take care of relief,
but it shouldn’t attempt to fool
the public and itself.”
“We ought to get a fair,
honest estimate of what seems
to be required for relief needs
and make an appropriation for
a full year,” he said. “Then
we should make provision to
raise that money. There would
be no use putting it down on
paper when we couldn’t trans
late it into bread.”
Supporting Adams’ stand for ,
a full year appropriation, Sen
ator Austin (R-Vt) said he
would prefer new taxes to fi
nance relief rather than an in
crease in the debt limit.
He observed that Adams’ propos
al to grant specific borrowing auth
orizations to the treasury might
“take the ceiling" off the debt
limit and said he would not be in
clined to favor it.
Economy advocates, meanwhile,
were none too enthusiastic about
the possibility of making any sav
ings in the remaining appropria
tions bills to be considered.
The senate appropriations com
mittee will resume work tomorrow
on a war department civil func
tions bill, already boosted $74,900,
000 by a subcommittee to provide
$30,000,000 for flood control, $25,
000,000 for new rivers and harbors
projects, $15,000,000 to start a third
set of Panama canal locks and
other minor items.
THOMAS NOMINATED
BY SOCIALIST PARTY
(Continued From Page One)
the things necessary for plenty,
peace and freedom as the rightful
possession of 130 million Ameri
cans."
"Why do I run? Because it is al
ready clear that no matter what the
old party conventions may do there
can be no effective independent
farmer-labor ticket in the field in
1940. It is already too late for such
a party to appear on a national
scale, except perhaps as a tempor
ary expression of personal interest or
desire for vengeance or a commun
ist front.
No Prophesy
“I make no prophesy of the size
of our vote. But this I affirm: if
we can make our fellow-citizens stop
and listen to our program for keep
ing America out of war, and abolish
ing poverty, if we can make our
words like a burr to stick in their
minds and consciences in this hour
of darkness, doubt and confusion,
we shall not have failed.”
Most of the convention’s day was
taken up with a renetval of yester
day’s controversy over the party’s
position with respect to American
economic assistance to the Allies. A
majority report had been prepared
calling for a position against any
sort of intervention. A minority
arguing for assistance to the Allies
lost 28 to 159 in an effort to sub
stitute a statement of their own
views. The adoption of the remain
der of the party's platform was post
poned until tomorrow.
In nominating Thomas, Felix
praised him as one whose "entire
adult life” had been spent "in the
service of the oppressed and exploit
ed.” He praised him, too, for his
many fights for civil liberties and
his “lifelong uncompromising strug
gle against war.” The latter alone,
he said, should "make him the na
tural choice of all, whether socialist
or not, of those who abhor war.”
DESTROYER ROE
ARRIVES TODAY
(Continued From Page One)
by the Country club, and the men
will be guests at a dance at the
Cape j'ear armory, with music to
be furnished by Ozier Stevens and
his orchestra.
Tuesday night a stag dinner will
be held by the Propeller club with
the officers as their guests.
The ship will leave Wilmington
Thursday.
ANOTHER GIRL,
CAIRO, Egypt, April 7. — <-T) —
Queen Farida of Egypt today gave
birth to her second child—another
girl. Both the queen and the baby
were reported getting along nicely.
The first child, Princess Ferial, was
born Nov. 17, 1938. The queen, a
commoner, and King Farouk were
married Jan. 20 of that year.
BROUGHTON NAMES
THREEASSISTANTS
MacDonald, Wells And R. L.
McMillan Appointed Eull
Time Field Workers
RALEIGH, April 7.—(JP)—The ap
pointments of three full-time field
workers for J. M. Broughton’s cam
paign for the democratic guberna
torial nomination were announced
today.
They are A. Carlton MacDonald
of Southern Pines, who has obtained
a leave of absence from his post as
deputy commissioner in the state
unemployment compensation com
mission; Robert C. Wells, Kenans
ville attorney; and R. L. McMillan,
Raleigh attorney.
An announcement of Broughton’s
speaking schedule said that in
Waynesville Tuesday the candidate
would make his first “political ad
dress” of the campaign.
Other engagements are:
Monday, in Raleigh before the N.
C. State college chapter of the Fu
ture Farmers of America; Tuesday,
Canton post office dedication; Wed
nesday, post office dedications in
Boone and Statesville; Thursday, in
Columbia at a meeting of young
democrats; and Friday, in New Bern
at a meeting of group three of the
North Carolina Bankers association.
BRITAIN PLANS
FURTHER CUT IN
U. S. PURCHASES
(Continued from Page One)
been home several months, and
Sir Percy Lorrain, ambassador to
Italy, will attend the meetings of
Britain’s representatives in the
Balkans. Foreign Secretary Lord
Halifax will preside at the first
meeting tomorrow.
Britain has warned the Balkans
that they would be deprived of
rubber and other products of the
empire if they act as reservoirs
for German war supplies.
Confidence in tightening of the
blockade around Germany and the
drive for markets was expressed
freely in Britain.
The Sunday Chronicle proclaim
ed that “Britain has taken the
offensive. The great push is on—
bloodless but deadly.”
Reynolds News reported the plan
for wtjsky dumping with the head
line “Whisky to Buy Us Bombers.”
The paper said Sir Andrew Rae
Duncan, president of the board of
trade, also would announce plans
regarding limitation on imports of
American-made movies next week.
Determined
“The government is determined
to stop the transfer of sterling
abroad wherever possible and if
the process continues it is possible
that eventually a ban on Holly
wood films may be declared,” the
newspaper declared.
Britain was said to pay between
£8,000,000 and £10,000,000 ($28,480,
000 to $35,600,000) for American
films annually.
Britain’s economic drive was
careful to take in dominion sources
of supply. Dispatches from Sydney
said Australian wool exports would
be limited to those countries which
guaranteed to refuse exports to
Germany.
Radio reports were quoted as
saying Spain already had arranged
a big wool purchase on these terms
and that Australia also had fixed
wool exports under similar condi
tions to several southeastern Euro
pean countries, notably Greece and
Hungary.
The ministry of information’s
foreign division was given a new
director with the appointment of
I. A. Kirkpatrick who acted as in
terpreter for Prime Minister Cham
berlain at his Godesberg confer
ence with Adolf Hitler in 1938.
Kirkpatrick succeeded E. H. Carr
who resigned.
BRITISH BOMBERS
DOWNED BY NAZIS
(Continued from Page One)
my warplanes” flew over Luxem
bourg territory yesterday to enter
Germany and returned by the same
route.
Its communique said:
"No special events in the west.
"The air force April 6 made recon
naissance flights over northern and
central France. One German Cor
nier reconnaissance plane was at
tacked by four Curtiss planes.
“The reconnaissance plane de
fended itself so long the enemy had
to retire because of lack of fuel.
The reconnaissance machine landed
safely at a home port.
"Late in the afternoon of April
6, numerous enemy planes entered
Germany by flying over Luxem
bourg territory northwest of Trier
and returned the same way.”
War Increases Value
Of American Exports
WASHINGTON, April 7- — —
Six months of war boosted the value
of United States exports 33 per
cent over 1938-39 levels, the Com
merce department disclosed today,
but caused notable shifts in the
type and destination of American
products.
Trade trends mirrored such inter
national policies as the British
French eforts to conserve exchange,
the blockade of Germany, abrogation
of the United States-Japanese trade
agreement and the 'eedom of arms
sales under the American neutrality
act.
During the period from September
1939 through February 1940, Cana
da and Latin America increased
their purchases about 47 per cent
each, Europe 27 and Asia 33. Eu
rope, in spite of war-time trade re
strictions, took 4'2 per cent of the
total, ^
OBITUARIES
JAMES LEE CLEWIS
LUMBERTON, April 7.—Funeral
services for James Lee Clewis, 64,
former textile worker, who died
Saturday were held this afternoon
at 3:30 o’clock from the late resi
dence. Interment followed in the
Clewis cemetery.
He was a deacon in the West
Lumberton Baptist church.
W. J. C. ITTNER
Funeral services for William John
Christian Ittner, 51, who died Sat
urday morning, will be held Mon
day afternoon at 4 o’clock from the
residence of his sister, 1604 Market
street.
The Revs. Walter B. Freed and
C. D. Barclift will conduct the
services. Interment will follow in
Oakdale cemetery.
Active pallbearers: T. N. Rowell,
D. B. Seitter, W; H. Best, J. H. H.
Tiencken, John Boesch, C. J- Olden
buttel, A. M. Carpenter and H. J.
Farrow.
Honorary; A. L. King, Dr. James
H. Hall, George T. Farrar, A. L.
Council, J. R. Sneeden, Dr. J. H.
Dreher, W. M. Edwards, G. F.
Tiencken, W. H. Montgomery and
Aaron Goldberg.
MRS. INGA TOBIASSEN
SOUTHPORT, April 7.—Funeral
services for Mrs. Inga Tobiassen,
wife of K. Tobiassen, who died Fri
day morning, were held here this
afternoon at 3 o’clock from the
Southport Methodist church.
The Rev. Mr. Harrellson conduct
ed the rites, assisted by the Rev.
Walter B. Freed.
Active pallbearers were John
Erickson, Robert St. George, J.
Berg, Alex Lind, Cronley Ruark and
W. H. Walker.
Honorary: Judge E. H. Cranmer,
B. J. Holden, C. E. Taylor, Willie
Dosher, H. T. St. George, W. T.
Butler, T. E. Hubbard, George Gal
loway, H. M. Shannon, R. Sanders,
Robert Thompson, Sr., Allen Ewing,
J. Rudolph, P. M. Snell, H. E. Hicks
and Thomas St. George.
MRS. R. K. BRYAN
Funeral services for Gertrude
Foy Bryan, who died here Friday
night after a long illness, were held
at 10 o’clock yesterday morning
from the chapel of Andrews’ mortu
ary.
The Rev. J. L. Plyler, of Scotts
Hill, conducted the services, assist
ed by the Rev. J. S. Crowley. In
terment followed in Oakdale ceme
tery.
ROSA MORRIS JOSEPHSON
Funeral services for Mrs. Rosa
Morris Josephson, who died at her
home here Saturday morning, were
held yesterday afternoon at S:30
o’clock from the home of her daugh
ter, Mrs. G. Dannenbaum.
The Rabbi M. M. Thurman con
ducted the rites and interment will
follow at Macon, Ga., her former
home.
She is survived by her daughter
and three grandchildren, Mr3.
Louise Fold and Robert and George
Dannenbaum.
MRS. I. K. MARSHBURN
Funeral services for Mrs. India
Koonce Marshburn, who died at her
home in Onslow county Friday aft
ernoon, were held yesterday after
noon at 2 o’clock from the late
residence. Interment followed in
the family cemetery.
Mrs. Marshburn was born on
November 12, 1848, at Tar Landing,
near Catherine’s Lake.
BENJAMIN F. SHAMBAUGH
IOWA CITY, Iowa, April 7— UP)
— Professor Benjamin F. Sham
baugh, 69, head of the political
science department at the State
University of Iowa, died here early
tonight.
The widely-known historian was
stricken a week ago with cerebral
thrombosis. He had rallied over
the week-end.
RUSSELL G. KELLEY
SARANAC LAKE, N. Y., April
7.—UP>—Russell George Kelley, 55,
veteran stage comedian, died of a
heart attack at his home here to
day. A native of Philadelphia, Pa.,
he toured with minstrel shows and
on the vaudeville stage until his
health failed m 1922. He came here
15 years ago.
WALTER W. WILHOIT
LOUISVILLE, Ky., April 7.—(A>)
—Walter W. Wilhoit, 59, a vice
president and for 25 years general
superintendent of the Stewart Dry
Goods company, one of Louisville’s
largest department stores, died to
day after a heart attack. He was
widely known in merchandising cir
cles.
HORACE S. SIKES
Horace S. Sikes, 60, died early
yesterday morning at his home,
712 North Fourth street, after a
long illness.
He is survived by his wife and
four sons: L. E. and Elbert W.
Sikes, of Wilmington: Thurman
D., of Carolina Beach: Leon H.
Sikes, of Elizabeth City; two
daughters, Mrs. L. H. Yost and
Mrs. A. O. Huffman, of Wilming
ton: two brothers, B. E. and J. B.
Sikes, of Rocky Mount; two sis
ters, Mrs. Eula Herring, of Tur
key, and Mrs. S. T. Bradshaw, of
Magnolia; and five grandchildren.
The deceased operated a grocery
business at Sixth and Bladen streets
for the past ten years.
The body will remain at Har
rell's Funeral home until 2 o’clock
this afternoon, when it will be tak
;n to Calvary Baptist church to
lie in state until 3 o’clock when
the funeral services will be held.
The Revs. Earl F. Bradley, J. E.
Allard and Walter B. Freed will
conduct the services. Interment
will follow at Bellevue cemetery.
Active pallbearers will be: L. M.
Sikes, Fred Powell, P. Townsend,
D. Horrell, P. J. Parish, and J. A.
Anderson.
Honorary: John Alexius, Ronald
W. Lane, Dr. J. Watts Farthing,
Dr. J. F. Robertson, John Penny,
Charles Casteen, Joseph C. Rourk,
Edgar Brown, W. W. Lewis, L.
Hines, Charles Newton, W. M.
Kelly, W. H. Best, E. L. Mathews,
J. R. Sellers and R. H. Williams.
MRS. PAULINE J. GREEN
HALLSBORO, April 7. — Mrs.
Pauline Jackson Green, 40, died
at her home near here tonight aft
er a lengthy illness.
Funeral services will be held
from the late residence Monday
afternoon at 2 o’clock, to be con
ducted by the Rev. R. J. Rasp
berry, of the Hallsboro Baptist
church.
Interment will follow in Smith
cemetery near here.
She is survived by her husband,
C. W. Green; two daughters, Re
gena and Reba Green, of Halls
boro, and one brother, Vasco Jack
son, of Bath.
E. W. BURT
SALISBURY, April 7.—W—E. W.
Burt, a grain broker here for many
years, died of a heart attack late to
day at his home. He was 74 years
old and a native of Holly Springs
N. C.
RUSSELL G. KELLEY
SARANAC LAKE, N. Y., April 7,
W—Russell George Kelley, 55, vet
eran stage comedian, died of a heart
attack at his home today. A native
of Philadelphia, Pa., he toured with
minstrel shows and on the vaude
ville stage until his health failed in
1922.
MRS. SARAH EVANS
Funeral services for Mrs. Sarah
Jane Evans, 74, of Wilmington, who
died Saturday afternoon at the home
of her daughter in Savannah, will
be held this afternoon at 4:30 o’clock
from the Yopp Funeral home herp.
The Rev. Walter Pavy, pastor of
Epworth Methodist chrch, will con
duct the services. Burial will follow
in Bellevue cemetery.
Active pallbearers will be: Eugene
Williams, George D. Williams, Wal
ter Coleman, Harlee Williams, G. D.
Robbins, Jr., and W. H. Austin, Jr.
Honorary: D. W. L. Skipper, E. S.
Williams, Henry Davis, E. F. Davis,
R. M. Kermon, D. H. Barnett, L.
Potter, Dr. Houston Moore, Leslie
Bass and L. J. Coleman.
FARM BOY ADMITS
MURDER OF WOMAN
(Continued from Page One)
driving while children were his pas
sengers in a car.”
Armed farmers and possemen
searched a wide area after the boy
said a negro forced him from the
Beck home at gun point. Two air
planes later joined the hunt.
The woman was wounded by a pis
tol bullet tftat tore througth her
body and shattered crockery.
Physicians said the victim had not
been attacked criminally. There
was no evidence the home had been
ransacked.
Mrs. Beck’s body was found by her
husband on his return from Fort
Worth.
Stoically, young Butler related his
part in the crime.
•'She said she was going to get
Clifton to kill me, so I went to my
house, got the pistol, came back and
shot her in the back,” the youth
said in the presence of newspaper
men.
‘‘She said: ‘Oh, Joe,’ as she fell,
but she didn’t say anything else,”
Butler continued. “I left the house,
drove down the road and threw the
pistol into a field about three quar
ters of a mile from the house. Then
I met Beck, his brother and my fath
er returning from the Fort Worth
trip.”
Saluda Man Found Dead
In Smoke-Filled Room
SHELBY, April 7.— <-'P) — John
Cambridge Miller, 24, of Saluda, N.
C., was found dead in his smoke
filled room at a hotel here early
today. He died of suffocation.
Coroner Roscoe Lutz said Miller
apparently dropped off to sleep
while smoking a cigarette and the
bedclothing was ignited. He check
ed in the hotel at 3 a. m. His body
was found four hours later.
His body was sent to Waynes
ville.
MILLIONS WITNESS
LENGTHY ECLIPSE
(Continued from Page One)
show, opened up at several places
along the eclipse path to give ob
servers a clear view.
New Orleans reported perfect
weather, and some observers said
the shadows of trees during the
eclipse looked like “double expo
sures” on a photographic film.
That was an expected feature which
probably was noticed in other
places.
The full, ring phase—known to
astronomers as the annular phase—
was visible where skies w-ere clear
in an area about 75 miles both
north and south of a center line
which touched San Antonio, Tex.,
New Orleans, Pensacola, Tallahas
see and Jacksonville, Fla.
The rest of the United States
and Canada saw a partial eclipse in
which the moon covered varying
amounts of the sun’s surface.
In the annular phase, 93 per cent
of the sun’s diameter was obscured.
The light was about 100 times that
of a full moon.
Astronomers and physicists set up
elaborate instruments throughout
the path to study a wide range of
scientific factors connected with
solar rays.
These rays can be studied only
when the sun is in eclipse, because
they are too intense for practically
all instruments when the full solar
power is on.
The Chisos mountains in Texas
w-ere the scene of an expedition to
measure the intensity of rays com
ing from the edge of the sun.
THOUSANDS VIEW ECLIPSE
NEW YORK, April 7. — C£>> —
Crowding various points of vantage
throughout the city Sunday, thou
sands of New Yorkers observed a
partial annular eclipse of the sun
by the moon, which first became
visible at 3:50 p. m. and reached
its climax at 5:05 p. m. when 08
per cent of its surface was covered.
As the partial phase of the black
out occurred, the city took on the
appearance of dusk or a very cloudy
day. The eclipse itself was visible
only to those persons equipped with
dark glasses or a strip of over-ex
posed film.
Some 200 persons were gathered
on the terrace of the Empire State
building where Arthur Draper, as
sistant curator of the Hayden
planetarium gave a short lecture
on the astronomical phenomenon.
The National Broadcasting company
televised the eclipse from the top
of the RCA building, making it pos
sible for some radio listeners to
view the sight from their homes.
GERMAN FREIGHTER
STARTS TEST TRIP
(Continued From Page One)
merchantment against seizure in her
waters.
German shipping agents said,
however, that if the ship gets
through without interference, “many
dozens” of German freighters would
ply the route. They hinted that Ger
many might get supplies through
neutral territorial waters from points
as far away as Russia's Black Sea
oil ports.
Yugoslavia was said to hold that
bauxite is not a war material and
therefore not subject to seizure, al
though what she would do to up
hold this view seemed uncertain.
Britain contends that bauxite is a
war material and therefore contra
band.
(Informed quarters in London said
Friday that reports of German ship
ping activity in the Adriatic were
“greatly exaggerated” and that
Britain would continue to exercise
control over sea-borne war mate
rials without giving the Germans ad
vance notice of her plans of strate
gy.)
Only yesterday the Yugoslav
freighter Dubac, bound for Italy, of
ficially was reported seized by the
British off the Greek coast and tak
en to the contraband control base at
Malta for examination.
tour members Of family
Are Drowned In Florida
MIAMI, Fla., April 7.—UP)—Four
members of a family were drowned
today when their skidding automo
bile plunged from a highway into
a drainage canal.
The dead were D. W. Crosby, S7;
his wife, 28; their 5-month-old
child, and the husband’s brother,
Dewey Crosby, 38, all of Miami.
The tragedy left four other
Crosby children orphans.
TO REPUDIATE LAWS
SHANGHAI, April 7. — <£>) — Ja
panese advices from Nanking to
day said Wang Ching-Wei’s "reor
ganized national government of
China” would notify fr reign powers
shortly of its repudiation of all laws,
decrees, treaties, agreements and
contracts made by General Chiang
Kai-Shek’s government at Chungking
after March 30. Wang’s Japanese
sponsored regime was inaugurated
on that day in opposition to the
Chungking government. Only Japan
has recognized it.
WEATHER 1
(Continued From Page One)
WASHINGTON, April 7. — (JP) —
"Weather bureau records of tempera
ture and rainfall for the 24 hours end
ing 8 p. m., in the principal cotton
growing areas and elsewhere:
Station High Low Free.
Alpena, rain _ 40 29 0.01
Asheville, rain _ 55 4S 0.29
Atlanta, cloudy _ 64 51 0.19
Atlantic City, cloudy . 55 40 0.00
Birmingham, cloudy _ 72 57 0.20
Boston, cloudv _ 54 30 0.00
Buffalo, cloudy _ 58 30 0.00
Burlington, cloudy _ 44 26 0.00
Chicago, rain _ 47 40 0.47
Cincinnati, cloudy _ 54 44 0.51
Cleveland, rain _ 53 35 0.24
Dallas, cloudy _ 62 41 0.00
Denver, clear _ 48 32 0.17
Detroit, rain _ 49 36 0.17
Duluth, rain_ 41 35 0.01
El Paso, cloudy_ 72 54 0.00
Galveston, clear _ 71 53 0.00
Havre, cloudy _ 45 27 0.00
Jacksonville, cloudy _ 70 60 0.01
Kansas City, rain_ 46 42 0.4S
Key West, cloudy ... SO 70 0.00
Little Bock, cloudy _ 62 52 0.00
Los Angeles, clear_ 68 51 O.SS
Louisville, cloudy _ 63 50 0.00
Memphis, cloudy _ 64 50 0.51
Meridian, cloudy _ SI 51 0.53
Miami, clear - 80 76 0.00
Minn.-St. Paul, rain . 41 40 0.14
Mobile, cloudy _ 70 66 1.11
New Orleans, clear .. 76 49 0.1)0
New York, cloudy_ 63 42 (too
Norfolk, cloudy _ 69 4 3 0 00
Pittsburgh, rain _ 59 36 0 00
Portland, Ore, rain . 63 50 0.53
Portland. Me., clear _ 48 30 0.00
Bichmond, cloudy_ 09 34 0.00
St. Louis, cloudy_ 54 48 0513
San Antonio, clear_74 45 OA’7
San Francisco, cloudy 64 54 0.11
Savannah, cloudy _ 70 54 0.00
Tampa, cloudy - 82 71 0.00
Vicksburg, clear _ 66 58 0.6S
Washington, cloudy _ 63 39 0.00
Wilmington, cloudy _ 67 45 0.00
TWO MEN ADMIT
‘PROFIT MURDERS’
(Continued from Page One)
ble confederates of Kasap and Kur
zawa.
Previously Dowling said the two
had confessed to killing Loyst and
burying his body in the basement of
an East Side house, luring him there
on a pretext of buying his car.
Not until today did Kasap, a free
lance used car dealer, admit any part
in the crime. Then, breaking under
long grilling, he told how he shot
Loyst in the back and head and then,
w'ith the help of Kurzawa, flung the
lifeless body into a crudely-dug grave
and poured quicklime on it.
In making his confession, Kasap
said he wanted to “relieve my con
science.”
LOUISIANA STORM
TAKES FOUR LIVES
(Continued from Page One)
six miles away, where physicians
and nurses were forced to work
without electric lights.
A medical detachment 6f 12 men
from the Mississippi national guari
at McComb, 35 miles away, came
here to assist the New Orleans Red
Cross in relief work.
Most seriously injured were Mr.
and Mrs. Tate C. Keen and their two
daughters, Dora and Nelds; Mr. and
Mrs. Buren Bennett, Miss Hollis
Birch, Mrs. Eugene Thompson, Mrs.
A. A. McNay, Inez Boyd, and Miss
Nina Spiller.
Also Meclianix Illustrated
Cartoon and News Events
Shows at 11:15-1-2:45-4:30-6:15-8
9:45. Feature In 25 Minutes
• TODAY • r.1 ■ M11 • TODAY •
ONLY I "J ONLY
WITH t_.H
JOHN HUHBARD ★ PEGGY WOOD ★ WILLIAM GARGAN
ALSO—MAGIC CARPET and LATEST NEWS
At 11-12:45-2:30-4:15-6-7:45-9:30 ★ Feature 24 Minutes Later
r “
SHE Was Just a Prairie Flower—
HE Was Growing Wilder by
the Hour—
You'll laugh and scream in hilarity
as you see “Wild Bill” Fields
courageously battle to save him
self from the alluring dangers of
the West.
JOSEPH CAILEIA * DICK FORAN
DONALD MEEK-FUZZY KNIGHT 4
Perfectly Grand Fun!
I
Now Flaying
At 1:15-3:15
5:15-7:15-9:15
Feat. 35
Min. Later
L_
★ SPECIAL ADDED ★ Ml
"The Vatican of Pius XII" 1
The first motion pictures of
Vatican City—
ALSO CARTOON & NEWS
BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES Going Native By Edgar Martin
iUS* VOWS* Vu.
oo ii «>y &on_v ....
V-~
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SOVAtTWtO' , OV BOOTS'S.
TK\6"L.\_ OO__—'
tCsOI/O , GOSH •• 1 HOPE 1 CHtO GE\ TO
TH' ViVTCHEW W\THOOT E>E\tO1 SEEK* 1
KVi' 1 HOPE C.OOHVE OOESKi'T HEEP
TH" BOTTOM'S OE H\S POT'S PftMS
TOO OARtO CEE MO TOO
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[ COPR. 1940 BY WEA SERVICE. INC. T. M. REG. U. S. PAT. OFF.

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