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The Wilmington morning star. [volume] (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, April 09, 1940, Image 10

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FIVE FEARED DEAI
AFTER T0RNA1 IE!
Louisiana Towns Count
Property Damage In Hun
dreds Of Thousands
AMITE, La., April 8.—OT—Citi
Sens and relief agencies toiled to
day to clear Amite of tangled debrii
in the wake of a tornado whicl
left three persons dead here, 21
seriously injured, and property dam
age estimated at $500,000.
Another tornado at Barataria, 10(
miles away, caused widespread dam
age and took at least one life, with
another person missing.
The dead at Amite were C. C. Pitt
man, 50, superintendent of Tangi
pahoa parish schools, his wife, 47
and Oliver Ruter*, 64-year-old ne
gro.
Houseboat Splintered
Mrs. Albert Guillie, 24, drowned
at Barataria, in the picturesque
bayou country when a tornado splin
tered a houseboat. Her husband,
38, is missing. Several homes and
houseboats were wrecked, but there
were few serious injuries. Damage
there was unestimated.
The two tornadoes and smaller
storms in Mississippi, Alabama and
Florida early yesterday developed
‘ from a low pressure area which
moved northeastward out of Texas
Saturday.
The twister here naueneu six
square blocks of the business area,
destroyed 55 homes, damaged nearly
100 more and made 700 persons
homeless.
Amite, a town of 3,000 population,
is in the heart of the rich straw
berry belt.
Terrified residents groped about
in darkness in their night clothes
after the vicious twister raged di
agonally across the town. It cut a
swatli more than a quarter of a
mile wide and three or four miles
long, uprooting gigantic oak trees,
biowing over a string of freight
cars and wrecking buildings In hop
skip-jump fashion.
Children were blown from their
parents’ arms. People watched their
homes swirl away while they re
mained unscathed.
A tornado killed 50 persons and
injured 150 in this area April 24,
1908.
The wettest spot in Alaska is
Little Port Walter. In 1938, it had
the all-time, all-Alaska high of
264.53 inches of rainfall. Last year
255.23 inches fell there.
ADVERTISEMENT
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For The Best In |
Shoe Repairing
CALX. 2487
SMITH SHOE REPAIR
127 PRINCESS ST.
St. John's Lodge
No. 1
Chartered 1755
Ancient Free
and Accepted Nasons
STATED COMMUNICATION for
month of April will be holden
tonight at eight o’clock.
Visting Brethren fraternally in
vited to meet with us.
By Order of the Master.
HENRY L. TAYLOR, P.M.,
; Secretary.
I High - Flying Plane Photographs
‘Ring Phase ’ Of Eclipse Of Sun
By MALCOLM JOHNSON
JACKSONVILLE, Fla., April 8.—
■ <jj>)—The moon turned the sun ipto
a flaming golden band of light yes
terday afternoon with a spectacular
show that won’t be repeated in the
United States for 54 years.
In a rare alignment of heavenly
bodies, the moon came directly be
' tween the earth and the sun. The
moon was farther away from the
earth than usual and the sun clos
er than usual with the result that
only the inside of the sun’s f' oe
was blocked out.
The effect—seen through smoked
glass, over-exposed photographic
film and special filters—wag that
of a big black polka dot with a shin
ing orange rim around it. It was the
first eclipse of such widespread
visibility in the United States since
1865.
The annular or ring phase of the
eclipse, which obscures 93 per cent
of the sun's diameter, entered the
United Stateg at Big Bend, Tex., at
4:40 p. m. (EST) and sped 2,000
miles eastward across the southern
part of the country in slightly more
than half an hour.
Persons living in a path, 150 miles
wide, saw the full annular phase if
weather permitted. The rest of the
nation and Canada saw only a par
tial eclipse.
Astronomers in Texas set up in
struments to study rays thrown out
from the edge of the sun, the eclipse
effect upon radio reception and oth
er scientific factors. Results of
their observations may not be
known for many months.
An experimental United States
army bomber -went so high into the
substratosphere after eclipse pic
tures that its four motors left a
wake of frozen exhaust in the sky.
The temperature dropped to 34
degrees below zero in the plane’s
cabin, where a window had been
left open to accomodate th nation’s
biggest aerial camera.
MRS. WEINSTEIN
HOSTESS AT PARTY
LUMBERTON, April S.—-Mrs. X.
E. Weinstein was hostess to forty
six guests Thursday afternoon at
Hotel Lorraine. Bridge was in play
at ten tables during the afternoon
and prizes were won by Mrs. Fred
erick Lennon, high scorer, Miss
Elise Monroe, second high and Mrs.
Graham McKinnon, Jr., travelling.
Refreshments were served in two
courses and joining the party at
this time were Mmes. F. Ertel Car
lyle, Erwin Williams, K. M. Barnes,
Aaron Weinstein and Max Wein
stein. Out-of-town guests were Mmes.
Sam Schilds and Joe Cohn, of Con
way, S. C., Mrs. Joe Sugar and Miss
Beatrice Sugar, of St. Pauls; Mrs.
Dolph Morse, of Newark, N. J.; Mrs.
Harry Levinson, of Fairmont. Lum
berton guests were Mmes. Hugh
Williford, William Pearlman, Jack
Goldberg, Menda Schaeman, Dan
Costin, H. P. Allen, Emanuel Sugar,
A. R. Stanton, L. R- Hedgpeth,
Chalmers Biggs, Leslie Huntley,
Graham McKinnon, Jr., J. L. Mee
han, J. J. Hood, Edwin Whiting,
XIarold Collins, Frank McLeod, R.
C. Ivey, John Knox, R. H. Liver
more, J. E. Johnson, Fred Lennon,
George Allen, J. A. Moffit, W. D.
Reynolds, Robert Samet, Furman K.
Biggs, William Parmele, J. B. Roun
tree, John Stedman; Misses Elise
Monroe and Martha Adams. A gift
of silver in her pattern was pre
sented Miss Sugar, bride-elect.
The Bachelors club held its
monthly meeting at Goodyears’
Thursday night and discussed plans
for the spring dance which will be
held in April or May. Cameron Mc
Lean, club president, expressed ap
preciation to members for the splen
did work they did in sponsoring the
Armory dedication dance here March
21, and appointed a committee to
serve on the board of directors of
the Community Chest. Ten dollars
was voted as the club's contribution
to the fund for the East Lumberton
school Safety Patrol who will attend
the annual conference at Washing
ton, D, C.
Mrs. Frank Moore entertained her
bridge club Friday afternoon at Ho
tel Lorraine wnth three tables in
play and prizes won by Mrs. E. K.
Butler for members and Mrs. A. PI.
McLeod for visitors. Refreshments
were served in two courses. Mrs.
J. L. Meehan and Mrs. McLeod were
the only visitors,
• * *
LELAND SCHOOL TO
STAGE PLAY TONIGHT
LELAND, April 8—On Tuesday
evening, April 9, at 8 o’clock, the
Senior1 class play of the Leland
High school will be presented in the
auditorium of the school.
It is entitled "Song or My Heart”.
A romance, the greatest since
“Smilin’ Through.” The play is pre
sented in a prologue, two acts and
an epilogue. The prologue and epilo
gue takes place in the present and
the two acts carry us back to life
as it was lived sixty years ago. All
the characters will wear costumes
of the period, hoop skirts and flare
tail coats. All the hilarity lies in
the two colored parts, but the other
characters play the more serious
parts. The plot is built around a
broken romance of old that taught
a lesson and which brings about
new romance of the present. Come
see the way each sentence unravels
the story. Small, but not least is an
old trunk which plays an important
part. What will it reveal?
P ollowing is the cast of charac
ters in order of appearance in pro
logue and epilogue: Sylvia, the girl,
FLASHES
OF LIFE
(By The Associated Press)
MACON, Ga.—A man parked his
car in a storage garage for the night
and left for his hotel.
A little later he reappeared at the
garage.
“I left something in my car,”
he said, mopping his brow.
Sure enough, he had. His six-year
old daughter was fast asleep in the
back seat.
BED-TIME
YAKIMA, Wash.—John Freauf
was having a hard time convincing
his 12-year-old son it was bed-time.
He had just w'on the argument,
he told the state patrol, when a car
crashed through the wall of the
boy’s room and landed on his bed.
The boy, just entering the room,
was unhurt.
TWO IN ONE
DUMONT, Iowa—An old biddy
here successfully tried a variation
on the ‘‘making two blades of grass
grow where one grew before”
theme.
One of the eggs in an electric in
cubator operated by Mrs. M. V.
Schuler hatched two lively and per
fectly formed chicks.
REUNION
CHICAGO—Twenty-one years had
passed since Thomas Burroughs and
Joseph A. Aubert last saw each oth
er, but neither is very happy over
their reunion. Two automobiles col
lided at an intersection, and enroute
to a hospital the drivers—Burroughs
and Aubert—recognized one another
as boyhood chums.
After some reminiscence over old
times, they began discussing re
sponsibility for the accident. The
result: Aubert signed a complaint
charging Burroughs with reckless
driving.
FRANKLIN SCHOOL
TO PRESENT PLAY
KERR, April 8 — The Franklin
High school in Sampson county be
gan its commencement program Fri
day, March 29, with the operettos
"Tomboy Joe” rendered by the Fifth
and Sixth grades and “Strange
Visitors” by the Seventh grade.
On Friday evening, April 12, at 8
o’clock the high school, combining
the interests of the agricultural de
partment with the other representa
tive high school activities, will pre
sent the annual commencement
play. This play will be “The Coun
try Cinderella” and is supported bj
a strong cast of characters. There
will be an admission charge, and re
serve seats will be available for an
additional cost. The proceeds will be
divided to cover commencement ex
pense, stage equipment and agri
cultural supplies.
The baccalaureate sermon will be
preached on Sunday afternoon,
April 14 at 3:30. The Rev. S- L. Mor
gan, Jr., pastor First Baptist
church, of Clinton, will preach. Miss
Estelle Fussell will present her
music pupils in a recital on Mon
day evening, April 15 at 8 o’clock.
The senior class will render their
class day exercise on April 17 at 8
o’clock in the evening. The graduat
ing exercise will be Thursday even
ing, April 18 at 8 o’clock.
ADD HEADACHES
FOR HEAD-WRITERS
CINCINNATI—(TP)—The Cincin
nati Reds and the St. Louis Cardi
nals, twin favorites to win the Na
tional league baseball pennant this
season, have pitchers named Bar
rett and both are nicknamed Red.
Cincinnati’s Barrett hails from Car
fornia, while the Cardinals’ hurler
comes from Florida.
Mary Rebecca Allen; Poley, the
servant (colored), J. c. Chadwick;
Laurel, the friend, Minnie Ruth
Potter; Michael, the boy, George
Thomas Rourk.
Play: Mandy, negro maid, Barbara
Adams; Poley, Mandy's boss, J. C.
Ci.adwick; Mrs. Carlotto Mayne,
Sylvia’s mother, Mary Wells Rourk;
Sylvia, the melody, Gertrude Mills;
Michael Willoughby, the lyric,
George Thomas Rourk; Steven
Mayne, Sylvia’s brother, Laurence
Williams; Harley Foreman, the dis
cord, George Hollis; Faith, life of
the party, Eva McGee; Shirley,
cause of the duel, Odessa Mintz;
Janet, who kept the song alive,
Viola Mintz.
Michael and Poley are played as
dual roles, but the part of Sylvia is
played by two girls.
A small admission will be charg
ed but the Senior class guarantees
; ■> evening of wholesome entertain
ment that will be well worjfh your
while, -
<**
RALEIGH
B RIEF S
Star-News Bureau
Sir Walter Hotel
By HENRY AVERILL
RALEIGH, April 8.—Mrs. Anna
Kitchin Josey, state women’s mana
ger for Lieutenant Governor Wil
kins P. Horton, was just a little
late for breakfast Saturday morning
all because she is a firm believer in
the old adage that "Friday night’s
dream on Saturday told is sure to
come true—if told before break
fast.”
It seems that Friday night she
had a beautiful dream—Horton had
lead so far in the first primary vot
ing that there would be no neces
sity for a second primary.
“When I got up, I was determin
ed to tell that to somebody before
breakfast if I had to talk to the
elevator boy or stop some stranger
between the Sir Walter and the
cafeteria,” she said.
Mrs. Lee Gravely keeps perhaps
the most comprehensive scrapbook
on the current gubernatorial cam
paign.
Senator Gravely’s press chief,
Vernon F. Sechriest, says that she
gets every possible clipping and
pastes them almost religiously. Not
only that, but she has the scrap
book properly divided and indexed
according to subjects. She has one
part for her husband’s clippings,
another for those pertaining to State
Manager Clayton C. Efird, and so
on.
Lynn Nisbet, Maxwell press rep
resentative, was back in Raleigh
from the Sandhill section Saturday.
Here in Raleigh there was quite
a touch of frost in the air and jo
your reporter remarked: “Well,
maybe this frost got some of the
peach blossoms, but it’s nothing
compared with the frost that's go
ing to hit this crop of candidates on
May 25.”
“Frost, hell!!!”, snaped Lynn,
‘That’s going to be a complete
freeze out.”
A. J. Maxwell is still in the lead
in number of county managers an
nounced to date—at least so far
as this bureau has been able to
keep track of them.
Maxwell has already announced
his chiefs in 60 counties. According
to what appears to be reliable In
formation this is more managers
than Maxwell had at the end of the
1932 campaign -when he polled more
than 100,000 votes.
Second to the commissioner of
revenue in manager announcements
is J. M. Broughton, with 48.
Worth Freeze, China Grove bank
er, was today named Maxwell man
ager for Rowan county. He is often
called Rowan’s “Ambassador of
Good Will.”
Up in Lieutenant Governor W.
P. Horton’s headquarters Saturday
everybody was exuding optimism at
every pore. They even fell to dis
cussing the possibility that their
candidate might lead so far in the
first primary that there would be
no second one.
One young lady worker said the
only objection to that would be that
they’d miss a month of fun and
excitement if things ended May 25.
“Oh, that's all right,” exclaimed
Mrs. Mary Pollard, “we could just
spend that month celebrating — it
would be worth it.”
Lee Gravely is confident that he
has the support of practically all
the tobacco warehousemen, auction
eers and others connected with the
big weed industry in North Caro
lina.
Paraphrasing a famous cigarette
ad: “With men who know tobacco
best it’s Gravely two to one (or
better.)”
Russians And Finns
Designate Ministers
MOSCOW, April 8.—VP)—Placing
the final seal on her newly con
cluded peace with Finland, Soviet
Russia has resumed normal diplo
matic relations with her small
neighbor.
Tass, official Russian news
agency, announced last night that
the government had designated
Ivan S. Zotoff as minister to Hel
sinki and had approved appoint
ment of Dr. Juho K. Paasikivi as
I Finnish minister to Moscow.
Zotoff has been Russia’s minis
ter to Latvia since November, 1937.
His post there will be taken over
by Vladimir Derevianski, minister
to Helsinki before the Russian
Finnish war.
Paasikivi headed a Finnish dele
gation which negotiated unsuccess
fully with Russia before the war
and participated in the subsequent
peace conferences.
Carolina News
Shorte_
(By thte Associated Press)
SHELBY—Pour hours after he
checked in a hotel here at 3 a. m.
yesterday, John Cambridge Miller.
24, of Saluda, was found suffocat
ed in his room. He apparently
dropped off to sleep while smoking
a cigarette and the bedclothing
was ignited. The body was sent
to Waynesville.
NEWTON ELECTION
NEWTON—A municipal election
will be held here May 6.
TOWN VOTE
WEST JEFFERSON—A munici
pal election will be held here May 7.
NEW ARMORY
LOUISBURG—A new national
guard armory is being built here.
WPA PROJECT
SALISBURY — A 1167,155 WPA
Rowan county drainage project is
under way.
SPEAKER
CHARLOTTE—Dr. P. E. Monroe,
president of Lenoir-Rhyne college,
spoke yesterday at St. Mark’s
Lutheran church here.
ANNOUNCES
LENOIR—Judge A. R. Crisp of
Caldwell county recorder’s court, a
democrat, announced he would seek
re-election.
ELECTED
BURLINGTON—The Rev. J. H.
Lightbourne, D. D., has been elect
ed president of the Alamance Coun
ty Tuberculosis association.
P.-T. A. MEETING
HIGH POINT—The 21st annual
convention of North Carolina Par
ent-Teacher associations will be
held here April 17-19.
WOODMEN
GREENSBORO—Dr. Emmet Brad
shaw, national president, will speak
at a Woodmen of the World ban
quet here Thursday night.
CANDIDATE
NORTH WILKESBORO—Floyd C.
Forester announced he would be a
candidate for the democratic nomi
nation for state senator.
BOND ELECTION
DUNN—Mayor HerDert B. Taylor
said today an election on the ques
tion of issuance of $50,000 worth
of water and sewer bond*
ing studied here. The
would be used to he , ,
$200,000 improvement : 'H
STACY TO SPEAK 5
ROXBORO-H. E. gia , , 1
berton, retiring president ' V
North Carolina School Bosh M
ciation, will be the prinr-j-"‘l"
er at a meeting of the
ty Schoolmasters' club tom0n V
SN^Vll"///^ f|RST CHOICE of millions.
lef their first thought
= IH FOR SIMPLE HEADACHE.
^I^ST. JOSEPH ASPIRIMj
TAKE THE SPRING OUT OF
x SPRING COLDS-USE2OROPSOF
PENETRO DROPS!
Repair Or Modernize Now
Why not decide to make those much n.,
pairs so that your home will be a nu,i> ■■■■'.
one? The CAROLINA has unlimited f
lend for this purpose. The Spring of the year is the j:.
to do this work too. Assets over $2,350,000.00!
Two
The / Million Dollar
Carolina Building & Loan Assn,
“Member Federal Home Loan Bank"
C. M. BUTLEB W. A. FONVIELLE \V. D JONks
President Sec.-Treas. Asst. Sec.-Tr^
ROGER MOORE, Vice-Pres. J. O. CARR, An,
advertisement '—
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With Proved Featuri
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BLACK - DRAUGHT’S principal
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EFFICIENT
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CALL 883
PRESENTED!
The Coca-Cola Bottling (;
motnh;;ys wmfi
FRIDAYS 12:30 P!
'fob ^
picks his racing
cars for speed —
his cigarettes for
slow burning
HERE THEY COME in a hurricane of flying dirt
and squirting oil. You can almost hear the high
whine of the motors and the shriek of brakes and
burning tires as they streak into the sharp curves.
They may call ’em "midget racers,'’ but there’s
speed to burn underneath those toy-like hoods.
Leading above is Bob Swanson, Pacific Coast
champ. In a split second these racers may be
climbing each other’s hoods. Bob Swanson likes
a slower pace in his off-time. Smokes Camels a lot.
He explains: "I don’t like overheating in my
cigarette any more than I like it in a racing
motor. I stick to Camels. I know they’re slower
burning ... milder and cooler.”
Slower-burning Camels give the extras
r SPEED'S MY DISH IN
A RACING CAR—BUT I
WANT My CIGARETTE
SIOW'BURNING.
CAMEL CIGARETTES BURN
ON THE SLOW SIDE —
GIVE THE 'EXTRAS' IN
.SMOKING PLEASURE
WITH BOB SWANSON, it’s always a
slow-burning Camel. "That slower way
of burning makes a big difference,”
says Bob. "Camels are milder—easy on
my throat. They don’t bother my nerves.
They never tire my taste. And they give
I
an extra amount of smoking, too.” Yes,
speed is fine in the right place, but
in cigarettes the coveted extras of cool
ness, mildness (which includes freedom
from irritation), and full, rich flavor
go with slow-burning Camels.
Copjxight, 1340, B. J. Beynolds Tobacco Co., Winston-SjJem, N. &
In recent laboratory
tests, CAMELS burned
25% slower than the
average of the 15 other
of the largest-selling
brands tested —slower
than any of them.That
means, on the aver
age, a smoking pins
equal to
5
EXTRA SMOKES
PER PACK!
more pleasure per puff...MORE PUFFS PER PACK1 j
CAMEL
“the cigarette of Costlier

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