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The Wilmington morning star. [volume] (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, April 27, 1940, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1940-04-27/ed-1/seq-8/

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CHAPTER FORTY-SEVEN
At the door of Terry’s room Rom
any turned to Cholly.
"Will you let me go in first, Chol
ly? I’ve a message from Myra for
Terry. And if he’s very ill it might
upset him more to see you."
Cholly nodded.
“All right. I'll wait here."
Romany knocked and a large,
round-faced nurse opened the door.
“I’ve permission to see Mr.
O’Rourke a moment,” she whis
pered.
Nurse Boyer admitted her and
went out.
“Terry,” Romany called softly.
"It’s — Romany. I’ve come to see
how you feel.”
“Oh — Romey." Terry opened his
eyes dully. Then he made a gallant
attempt to grin. “I’m glad to see
you, Glamor Gal.”
Romany tried to smile back.
“You sort of ran into something,
it seems.”
"Argument with a truck, and I
lost.” Terry closed his eyes again.
“How’s Cholly?”
“She’s fine,” Romany told him.
"She’s outside. I thought I’d better
come in first and see if you wanted
to see her.”
eyes again. "Have you seen Myra,
Romey?”
Romany nodded.
"Yes. She sent for me.”
"Goodr’ Terry grinned painfully.
“Guess the kid had a few things
to get off her conscience."
"She asked me to forgive her and
I told her there was nothing to
forgive."
Terry smiled.
"Myra isn't a bad guy. She’s had
to climb up the ladder the hard •
•way and doesn't want to see any- i
body take her place. I guess any- ]
body would fee] that way.” ]
“Surely they would," Romany
generously agreed. r
"Tell me the truth," Terry said i
then. "Is she going to be all r
right?” £
"I—think so. It's her legs that
are injured."
Terry covered his eyes with a ]
bandaged arm. s
“It’s all my fault,” he said t
hoarsely, "if she doesn’t walk again.
I was potted, and she didn’t want -
me to drive. But you know me when
I make up my mind!”
Romany touched his arm sympa
thetically.
“You mustn’t blame yourself too
much, Terry. You must get well.
Try not to worry about anything
till you're stronger.”
"I — I’ll make it up to her."
Terry’s voice trembled. "As soon
as I am well enough I’m going to
ask her to marry me. I’m not much
good—but—”
"Oh, Terry,” Romany said happi
ly, "I’m so glad! Myra loves you.
She told me for the first time in her
life she knows what love is. She
sent me to see how you were.’ ’
Terry grinned.
"Mvra—said that? Swell! Then
I guess everything’s all set. Maybe
somebody’ll give me a break so 1
can support a family.”
Romany said fervently:
•’Terry O’Rourke, if you settle
down to your singing, nothing in
the world can keep you from the
top. If you stay sober—”
When she hesitated. Terry
sighed.
“Listen, if a scare like this
doesn’t put a man on the water
wagon, there isn’t much hope for
him. I’m cured. I’ve wrecked my
self and injured a woman for life.
I’ve had my lesson.’’
“I’m sure you have.” Romany’6
troice was warm with friendliness.
“About — Cholly.” Terry closed
his eyes. ‘Did she take my busting
•up pretty hard, llomey?”
"She was terrtbly sorry,” Rom
any assured him. "It happened just
as she was about to announce her
engagement.”
The muscles in Terry’s face
tensed, but there was no other sign
cf emotion.
“I guess Hayworth is a pretty
ewel! guy. Tell Cholly they have my
blessing. But no man is good
enough for my—for Cholly.’'
“I know,” Romany said sadly.
••But Terry, this is all for the best.
nrVT i T llTiV ^i
Would you like to see her for a
moment? She is outside.”
Terry hesitated, then shook his
head.
“No, Romey — not yet. Not now.
I—I’d kind of like to wait until I
get used to the idea of marrying
somebody else—and everything.”
Romany choked.
“I understand. And so will
Cholly.”
She bfent and touched Terry's
cheek with her fingers.
"I like you, Terry! And good by
for now. I — I'll be hearing big
things about your singing some of
these days.”
"Thanks, Glamor Gal.” He
grinned again. Then he closed his
eyes wearily and Romany went
hurriedly from the room.
Outside the door, Romany took
Cholly’s arm and led her down the
torridor.
"He — thinks it's better for you
to come later,” she told Charlotte
with great relief. "He's very tired.
Cne visitor was about all he could
stand today.”
“He—he’s going to be all right?”
Cholly asked, wiping her eyes on
ier wisp of a handkerchief.
"I’m afraid so,” Romany smiled.
"Or he'd hardly be making wea
ling plans."
Cholly stopped.
Romany nodded.
“He’s going to marry Myra
is soon as they are out of the hos
pital. He says he guesses sonte
ine’ll give him a break so he can
mpport a family."
Chollv’s eyes were clouded.
“Myra—oh, that'll never do!”
"Oh, yes it will," Romany smiled.
‘Myra and Terry have both learned
heir lesson. The hard way, as
jerry says. He needs responsibility
0 spur him to do things. He blames
limself for injuring Myra and feels
le must take care of her."
“I’ve a strange feeling they'll:
lake a go of it. Myra's helplessness :
las touched the one chord in
jerry's Irish heart that will make j
, man of him."
Cholly smiled suddenly.
“I think perhaps you're right. He
leeded someone weaker than him
elf. Oh, Romany! I'm so glad for
hem both."
“So am I," Romany sighed. “And
■ .a.i... -...
1
Myra will walk. Wait and see.
She’ll walk for Terry’s sake.”
Back at the farm, a beaming
Baxter Tree ran down the steps
to greet the girls when they drove
up to the wide veranda.
"Romany!” He pulled her out of
the car. “Oh, my darling!”
When Romany caught her breath,
she said wonderingly:
"Why. Bax! What has happened
to you?”
“My show!” He lifted her from
her feet and kissed her. "Hal Trot
te* has sold ‘Paradise’.”
Cholly hurried into the house,
leaving them alone in the falling
twilight. Romany clung to him as
if she would never let him go.
"I knew it,” she said finally. "I
was sure you would sell it, Bax.
Now you—won’t go away!”
He kissed her warm cheeks ten
derly.
••Not—if I’m not too late, darling.
If I'm still in the running. Is
there any chance of my using up a
little of the time that Nelson guy
has been taking so much of?”
Romany raised her lips.
"Oh, Bax! I’ve—a lifetime that’s
yours. All yours. You—blind dar
ing."
As Cecelia smiled from the win
dow of the hall upstairs, Bax and
Romany became ablivious to the
world. Then Cissie heard footsteps
behind her and turned quickly. It
was Brent Nelson.
A few moments later Romany
remembered to ask:
"Oh, Bax—and who is our spon
sor for ‘Paradise?’ Naturally, I'd
iike to know, since I'm to be your
leading lady.”
“Our lucky sponsor"—Bax kissed
her again—"is a perfume guy. The
Lenoir Perfume company.”
Romany gasped. Aunt Cissie!
Lenoir was the broken-down com
pany Cecelia had bought in Paris
and planned to move to Chicago.
But she decided it would be just as
well to keep the sponsor's real iden
tity secret for the time being.
She smiled, and her green eyes
were like emeralds. But suddenly
the remembered Brent and what she
■trust tell him, and a shadow crossed
he radiance of her lovely face.
(To Be Concluded)
POSTMASTER
WASHINGTON, April 26. — (IP) —
President Roosevelt sent to the sen
ite today for confirmation the
romination of James H. McKenzie to
3e postmaster at Salisbury.
-- , - , -
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'WHV, THAT \ / VEH, DUMB LIKE A \"\
DUMB FAT- f FOX/ HE SAW THE \
I 'HEAD/ l\ KIP PUT A MOUSE . |
KICKIN' / ) iN HIS LUNCH BOX /
THAT KIP \ / LAST WEEK BUT /
RIGHT IN ( WAITED TILL HE SAW \
CFRONT OF / \ HIM WITH TH' BOSS \
TH' BIG / / SO NO ONE CAN SAY \
\V BOSS/ < I HE'S A RAT,SQUEALER,
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YOU GET THIS HAVE IT BLOW NEVER GET IT ANYWAY
3 SHORTS- ANNIE"- ^
MOST LIKELY fcJ£>BOOY'LL
EVER GET IT-IF NICK
POES GET IT, I CAN
t50MY WRITIN' LATER
THERE— IT’LL FALL
INTO TH’ RIVER, I HOPE
BON VOYAGE
___
WASH TUBBS The Bird Has Flown By Roy Crane
ftcAftS!
EASY SAUNTERS
INTO DUKE'S HIDE
OUT ALONE, RES
CUES MARGOT
LETORE
0ARIV16 PAID AFTER
PARK; ROBBER6AWG
AWAKENS BUT
CAN'T FIND WEAPONS
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TIPS OFF THE
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3AS0LINE ALLEYj Duty Pays Cash, Too
LCO<, MISS SHIPS! THAT'S GOOD NEWS' |] IT'S TOUR OH! I THOUGHT MAV8M
MORTIMER GOODE AND HERE'S SOME J ■ PAT AS WITNESS j IT WAS MT SHARE OF I
GETS POUR TSARS FOR TOU- AN ORDER W || IN THE CA5E. THE SlOOO SEWASE. f
IN TjE PEN! IN YOUS NAME FOR J
- SIX DOLLARS._/
[TIE GUMPS ___ Address Unknown
I - 1 i T 1 r“~ —————— , ' i • • ••■ • ■.■ ■ ■ —i
I/WH6E' MY SUN OF
‘ HAPPINESS IS RISING,/ —
THE WHOLE WORLD IS A
CjORSEOUS SYMPHONY =
\ OF HAPPY HARMONY;/;.1.* Ss
Wye <»ot a ooeWr
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had ADVERTISED for a J
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BRICK BRADFORD-Seeks the Diamond Doll By William Ritt and Clarence Gray
THE BANDIT WHOM BRICK HAS KNOCKED DOWN
_LEAPS UPON HIM-_
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THE THIRD BANDIT RACES FOR rHE'DOOR, FlRINGj
AS "SHE" RIJNS— _J

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