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The Wilmington morning star. (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, April 30, 1940, Image 10

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1940-04-30/ed-1/seq-10/

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WRITTEN FOR AND RELEASTOJYCESTHAL^R^S^A^OCIATION^^^^^^^
CHAPTER ONE
“You won't gain anything by be
ing sulky about it,” I called back
over rny shoulder. My voice shook.
Out here in thfe garden all was
quiet. The full moon glistened on
the placid river just beyond the
willows. The tall figure of Alfred
Markham, with whom I had been
talking, leaned against the railing
at the end of the rose arbor, face
tilted up toward the stars.
Through the partly opened glass
doors of the clubhouse I had seen
Jerry Montcalm approaching across
the lighted hallway, staggering a
bit as though he would welcome
fresh air. j met him in the doorway.
Laughter and the clink of glasses
sounded from the ciubroom beyond.
“What's matter dear old Al-Al
fred?” Jerry asked, clutching the
handle of one of the doors for sup
port. “Heard you quarreling. Bill,
you — hie -— look sick. V\ hat s
wrong?”
I waved him back inside and
wiped my perspiring forehead ierv
ously. "Nothing, Jerry. Please cave
him alone. We've had a row. ’
“What? You and Al? Good old
Al. Best of friends. W. at vould
you—hie—rove about?”
I moved into the hall, pushing
Jerry with me, and determinedly
shut the door. "It really wasn’t
important, Jerry. Forget it. Every
thing will be all right. I don’t know j ;
how it started. I’m sure he didn’t'
mean it.”
“ ’Course he didn’t. I’ll speak to 1'
him !"
1 put an arm around Jerry’s
shoulders and guided him away, t
“Come upstairs and soak that head;
of yours in cold water," I suggest-' ‘
ed. “You're a little under the weath- ‘
er, old man.”
“Never felt better in my life,’’ he
protested, stubbornly, pulling loose, j '
“Go upstairs yourself:”
“Okay, if you'll go back to the
party.”
“A bargain—a bargain, pal.”
My head swam. My fingers v.el-}
corned the cool, solid support of the [ 1
stair rail. I started up the deep car-j ’
peted steps to the living quarters =
on the second floor. At the landing, j ‘
turning to look back. I made sure j;
that Jerry was stumbling back to
ward the double doors of the main j ]
clubroom. Someone had started to j
play a lively tune on the piano and
the crowd was singing. Jerry was
singing, too, off key.
Jly hands still were trembling as
I washed them. I hadn't realized I
how the quarrel with Alfred had|
frightened me. I had suspected late
ly that there was something wrong
with him, but I hadn't known until |
tonight that lie might become vio
lent.
Through an open window I faced!
the opposite ''L” of the clubhouse. |
jutting out toward the river on the |
south side of the garden court. On i
the far shore slumbered the long
wharf at which the river steamers i
discharged their cargoes of pota
toes. Beyond, the lights of the city
marched away until they blended
and glowed in wisps of fog drifting
over the theatrical district in the j
distance.
The clubhouse had b^en built for
quiet and privacy near the end of
a narrow peninsula around which
the river made a sharp bend. The
building cut across the neck of land
so that the rear court on which 1
looked down was enclosed by the
two “Jb's” and by the river flowing
past on the west. It was in this en
closed court that I had left my
friend.
I was glad there was no one else
on the second floor, and that my
absence from the party aroused no
attention. The singing and piano
playing continued.
But just before I stepped out of
the room ten minutes later, the mu
sic drifting up the stairs stopped.- A
man in the hall below was speak
ing excitedly. A sudden confusion of
other voices broke in upon him. A
chair overturned.
I ran around the corner of the
hall to the top of the stairs and
looked down. The speaker had come
in through the glass doors from the
court.
I didn’t recognize him until some
one in the startled group in the
clubroom doorway noticed me and
pointed up. He tilted his head back,
and I saw he was John St. Clair,
the self-assured young broker and
president of the club.
What he had been telling the oth
ers I could only guess. Everyone
was staring at me in peculiar si
lence.
I descended the stairway, my fin
gers sliding uncertainly on the ban
nister. There were more than
twenty in the group facing me, the
ladies mostly still inside the club
room, standing on tiptoe to peek
over the shoulders of the men, and
they a!l seemed to be holding their
breaths.
“Jerry says you were quarreling
with Al,” St. Clair announced in a
strange tone of voice. "Is that
right?”
"It was a personal quarrel,” I
told him, stopping on the bottom
step. "I shouldn't have said any
:hing about it. It doesn't affect the
•est of you.”
“Oh, yes. it does!. I'm sorry, Bill,
jut you’ve got to tell us what it
,vas about. You've got to clear
,-ourself—if you can.”
"I—I can’t tell you.”
There was a sharp collective in
ake of breath.
“What do you mean?" snapped St.
Hair. “Don’t you know what's hap
pened?”
“Easy!” expostulated Jerry, who
tad sobered surprisingly. “He’s
teen upstairs. He didn't hear you.
rorget what I said about him and
-and Al.” His voice was rising in
>itch. "It doesn't mean a thing. It
tally doesn't."
I took the last step slowly and
nechanically. “What doesn’t mean I
thing? What's this I don't know j
bout?"
"It's Al.” St. Clair turned and
jointed through the door toward
he court. Even St. Clair, master
if most any situation, was upset.
I found him out there by the lily
pond—lying—stabbed through the
i cart!”
Muriel Benson, who with fright
ned brown eyes had been staring
it. me from the parlor doorway,
ave a weak, far-away cry and
ollapsed. It was as though a taut
tring holding her had broken.
Muriel and I. only a year ago,
lad been engaged to be married.
BURNEY, EVERETT
TO SPEAK TONIGHT
Will Be Principal Speakers At
Meeting Of New Hanover
County P.-T. A.
Principal speakers at the annual
year's-end meeting- of the New Han
over County Council of Parents and
Teachers at the New Hanover High
school tonight at 7:30 o'clock will
be judge John J. Burney, of Wil
mington, and Mrs. Ruth Vick Ev
erett, of Chapel Hill.
The meeting this year, in the
form of a reception, takes the place
of the banquet of past years at
which delegations from all the Par
ent-Teacher associations in the
county gathered to review activities
of the past year.
The following program will be
given: Band Concert 7:30 p. m. Lieu
tenant Eugene Lacock, directing the
High school band: March, Campus
on Parade, Selection, Southern Mel
odies, American Patrol, March, Star
and Stripes Forever;
Program S p. m. Mrs. W. P. Roud
abush, presiding; Invocation Rev.
Carl Fisher; Presentation of honor
guests; Summary of Council Activi
ties; Music N. H. H. S. Glee club,
Albert Brown, directing; introduc
tion of Judge JGlm j. Burney by
T. T. Hamilton, Jr.; Address Judge
John J. Burney; Introduction of Mrs.
Ruth Vick Everett by Mrs. A. M.
Alderman; Address Mrs. Ruth Vick
Everett; Reception and Exhibit Li
brary.
Judges of Exhibit for P.-T. A. pub
licity and procedure books. Mrs.
Ransey Weathersbee, Mrs. Walter
B. Freed. Miss Ethel Williams.
Some of the new safety features
in taxicabs are: a light on the
dashboard telling driver if doors
are not closed tight; a device to
prevent car from rolling backward
downhill if motor stalls; a buzzer
that warns pedestrians behind the
car when the gearshift is in re
verse.
Jerry had won her from me, but it
was still a shock to hear me ac
cused of murder.
(To He Continued)
- — —---—■
THIS CURIOUS WORLD V.rglT
If
/X
OBSERVED IN
DECEMBER, 1939,
HAD AN AREA
ESTIMATED AT
3,000
AAILLIONJ
SQUARE AAIL-ES
...AN EXPANSE
SIXTEEN
TIMES LARGER
THAN THE
ENTICE SURFACE
OP THE
GARTH.
HY DO WE EINJD - I
EARTI—IWORMS
ONI THE LAWM O ’
AFTER A PJAINJ / I
T. M. REG. U. S. PAT. OFF.
SEECH TREE
PROTECTS ITS BODS
FROM WINTER. COLD
BY WRAPPIN6 AND
COUNTER- WRAPPING
EACH IN A BLANKET
1 OF -SMOTFSV 5CAZFS.
I
i T > ^ COPR. 1940 BY NEA SERVICE. INC. ^
ANSWER: The rain floods their burrows and drives them to the
surface.
BELA LANAN—COURT REPORTER By L. Allen Heine
Founded on Actual Court Records and You Can Be the Judge
The
Strange
Case of
HENRI,
THE
LION
TAMER

IN SIX
EPISODES
| No. 2
IN yesterday's episode, the metropolitan
Circus troupe gave a birthday dinner to
HENRI ..THE LION-TAMER ! HE WAS TOASTED
AND LAUDED BY ALL EXCEPT THE "LIVING
SKELETON” AND "THE DWARF” W/i-IO_ON
ACCOUNT OF THEIR DEFORMITIES __ HOI D A
SEC RET, JEALOUS GRUDGE AGAINST HIMl!
AND NOW,. IT'S NEARLY SHOW TIME !
UvUJ'UUSA* I
GIRGUS ;
9 Bio SEN SAT 1(1 AM, ms l)
'Jeattuwq '
iWWSfJ?
A(H<)»^TN ,R .o„.
x A>> ^
STEP EIGHT OP/
BUY YOUR t
tickets here!
^ And for the same]
PRICE ,VOU SEE_
that sensation OF
THE AGE-HENEl
THE LION-TAMER,
IN HIS DEATH-DEFyiNG
ACT, WITH SIX
FEROCIOUS BEASTS
FROM THE AFRICAN
JOngle ; console!
COME ALL !
TICKETS • TICKETS I
WHILE j
I
0.4
THE
inside!
J*
.4^—.
FINE , PEDRO! VOU ARE SMART /
VOU have a small BODY—
but— A LA&GE HEAD/
OUT OUR WAY By J, R. Williams
W ^ ■' rs, 4 29 (V/ |
BORN THIRTY VEARS TOO SOON j.9Wlu.^s J
OUR BOARDING HOUSE . . with . . . Major Hoop|e
f7 ALL X KNOW IS HE WAS
I READING THE PAPER AND |
/THEN HE JUMPED UP ALL I
I OF A SUDDEN, GRUNTED %
| SOMETHING ABOUT"GOLDEN
HAND OF OPPORTUNITY
(jAND GALLOPED OUT/
MISSING TWO if
CONSECUTIVE %
NOSEBAGS ISN'T)
^HOOPLE/'— d
THAT'S AS OUT|
'of character!
1 AS ANTS IGNOR
ING A PICNIC/^
— -O
1^i6cussin& the.
■ LARGE MAN, WHO
■ WASN'T THERE/
LITTLE ORPHAN ANNIE We, The fiT
W SURE- ^ ^EXACTUy'ALlT^ \ f^XJ SAID IT- V K SURE- FEW \( YEAH» FEW \f~~SO,Tr CAN ^
I *19^ .5f^-^!y8?_DY 1 WHY. NONSENSE-AND [/ ALWAYS HAVE I SORE-HEADS LOUD-MOUTHED U HAPPEN HERF ?
WRECK A COUNTRY THIS I WHO'D f MHO COULD IF ) BEEN A FEW J WHO'D RATHFP I piDnc am Ca&d k ,i
i' THEY WANTED To? SCREW-B^LS 1 TALKTH^N ’ BWK-WKO 1 WSA ’
IS- W TO 6WHY BOTHER. TO J HATCHING PLOTS- I WORK- OUST VISTENS TC I GOOD ONE!
FEV^5£££T 06 LOOSE‘/ KUIN \ [INVESTIGATE THEMrJ Wf-IAT HARM | A HANDFUL OF ’EM*? LIKE TO 1 WHATD WE BE
VMATBE— JJ THIS [THIS IS A FREE CAN THEY DO? J CRACK POTS- SEE ANY OF'EM 1 DOW IN ThF
rhfi»aip«iC0lOTRYy
WASH TUBBS Credit To Roderigo By Roy Crane
JUST SOT A PHONE CAUL FROM FREDDIE, WHO EU1DEV0TLV HE AND ROPERIGO HAD WITH PUKE DEAD... WE NEUER POOR DUMB CLUCK! Ht
ACCOMPANIED THE POLICE RAID ON THE DUNE &J AN ARGUMENT JUST AFTER MARGOT OH, DADDV IT MEANS I NEED FEAR WAS A LOT MORE HELP
—r HIDEOUT. THE DUKE IS DEAD AND I SOT AWAV. THE POLICE UIC'DC CDCCH /HIM AGAIN... TO US THAN TO HIS
-~ — —r /-* CAPTURED SPIKE, AND RECOV- V KC rKCfc .. /THANKS TO VOU,
kZmS V I ERED OLD LADV PIPPINGTON'S , ---- MV SON —
•*«, O ter NECKLACE ^ > X _^
GASOLINE ALLEY News Summary
SEE, Me. WMPi.fi/ I
COT MV SHA.efi OF
THE efitYAKD FOB \
CAPTJBIN' COOPS. )
) COHGIEATULATIONS?
1 SKEEW. I HOPE
YOU PONT FEEL
THAT NOW YOU
CAN HETIHE. i
iw nor quotin' \
woiexr on $175, An' t
I'M HOT TELLIN' A f
soul i cot rr. jt'
WHAT PO SOU WOW ASOUT
THAI) SNIPS/ MLLBT COT $175
of that s/ooo zemeo: ^
_
F Y
THE GUMPS__ __ The Great Lover I
/I'M <aEYTi.'.t<S A «*T ANNOYED \
/AT BABY'NOT THAT 1 DON'T |
\ "SYMPATHIZE, BUT-EYERSINCE \=
1 SHE RECEIVED THAT UNSiO/WED)
\ Poem, s.he'3. been moo»n<e /
\AROUND THE HOUSE UKEA/
Y EttiE-SlCK
V>CAEF-j-' vvv
[ VJWYMIW-HOW V
/ CAW YOU BEfcRUDCjE e$
/ YHE POOR HUWfcRY M
tilKL. A CRL'Mfo FROM J1
V CUPIb'S FESTIVE Mm
\ EsCARO!” sJ&Bm
Xl UNDERSTAND, BECAUSE.
( I'VE BARTAKEN OF HIS
\ choicest miamds-when
\ i WAS A YOUKXi, FELLOW,
11 HAb To BRUSH LOVE
V Slc>< &IKWS FROM VY
\wthukeleave^^
\
M<E
Ap/,
smr
W -YOU HUNC* AROUND MY
f front door so Loner,
a PEOPLE BECjAN To THINK
Px YOU WERE A COMPANION
S .V-KPiECE ToTrtS IRON
|^|j«*K\Doe on ThEJ-AWN^I
|Toh, There you are/
”couseew miw-and j
YOU ARE NOT YET
Ready? VJt are to
fciO To EUY SHOES AT j
V The wonderful- j
c.J'AvSAUE DWWTOWH
BRICK BRADFORD—Seeks the Diamond Doll
By William Ritt and Clarence Cray
GRAB THAT '
[ IS MY PAL,S
BRADFORD '
. Vtt—-^—'
BRICK DASHES UP TO
SEIZE THE FALLEN THIJfi -
[HEY-LOOK OUT/
^v:—
[taking ADVANTAGE OF BRICK'S MISHAP rHETHiffl
FLEES TOWARD AN OPEN WINDOW ji
mm 1 /

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