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The Wilmington morning star. (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, April 30, 1940, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1940-04-30/ed-1/seq-5/

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Broughton Charges Use 1
Of Whispering Campaign
Savs Opponents Have Linked
k ‘ His Name With ‘Outlaw
ed Gambling Machines’
(liv The Associated Press)
I \i Broughton of Raleigh, a
/ democratic candidate for governor,
iast night that he had been
“victim of a whispering cam
:i,r|1 wtiich linked his name with
Outlawed gambling machines.”
Jn a ,-adio speech, Broughton said
t).e rmnors had been “diligently put
forth by some of those actively con
nected with the campaign of at least
anel of the (other gubernatorial)
candidates.
■ U has been whispered around in
undercover fashion than I was
responsible for the licensing of out
]a~ved gambling machines which
have so tremendously increased in
clir -pate during the last two years,”
he said.
,,eod only say that such state
ment' is wholly and viciously false,
and the use of statements and ru
mors of this character will undoubt
,i:ilv pe resented by all right-think
iii- and fair-minded voters of the
state.
"Several years ago I appeared as
lawyer before legislative commit
tees onbehalf of manufacturers and
operators of machines vending such
merchandise products as peanuts
am] other products raised and sold
by farmers of North Carolina.
"Peanut growers and others inter
ested in these products in this state
Jere sufficiently interested of their
own volition to appear before the
committee and urge a reasonable li.
cense provision with respect to their
merchandise vending machines on
the ground that they would stimu
late the sale of peanuts raised here
in North Carolina.
“This clearly legitimate and
ethical appearance as an attorney
before legislative committees has
been the foundation of a false and
malicious rumor that I have appear
ed on behalf of slot machines of the
gambling variety.”
Broughton added that he “not only
aid not appear for the slot ma
chines,” but denounced these gamb
ling machines as vicious and harm
ful.”
The question of the re-election of
President Roosevelt held the poli
tical spotlight on several other
fronts.
Gubernatorial Candidate L. Lee
Gravely, Rocky Mount democrat, de
clared in Mantel that the people
would demand a third term for Mr.
Roosevelt. “A great federal admin
istration, directed by a magnificent
leader, is cooperating in the solu
tion of our problems,” he said.
At the same time, Gravely's man
ager, C. C. Efird, issued a state
ment in which he asserted that in
Gravely and Mr. Roosevelt “the peo
ple will have leaders to whom they
can look for consistent liberal lead
ership.” He added that “anyone
who claims Western North Carolina
is sewed up for any particular gub
ernatorial candidate is suffering
from a warped imagination.”
At Raleigh U. S. Senator Claude
Pepper of Florida, told young demo
crats of the Fourth congressional
district that the American people
would not "give up Roosevelt.”
Ronald Wilson, assistant manager
for gubernatorial aspirant A. J.
Maxwell, Raleigh democrat, said his
workers were steering clear of the
third-term issue, and were "putting
Maxwell in the lead for governor,
with organizations in 93 counties.”
Maxwell attended a conference in
Sylva of his managers in Cherokee,
Swain. Macon, Graham and Hay
wood counties, and his headquarters
issued a statement that “reports
from all section of the west indicate
clearly that the Maxwell plan, for
giving every rural mail route and
every school bus route an all
weather road, is bringing the sup
port of town and country people
alike. Maxwell also spoke in Way
nesville.
Broughton, besides his radio talk,
spoke in Elizabethtown and attend
ed the meeting of young democrats
in Raleigh. Calling for vital changes
in farming methods, he asserted:
“The wisest leadership and fullest
To Check Constipation
Get at Its Caose!
If constipation has you down,'so
you feel heavy, tired and dopey,
it’s time you did something about
it And something more than just
taking a physic! You should get
at the cause of the trouble.
If you eat the super-refined
food most people eat, the chances
are the difficulty is simple-you
don't get enough “bulk.” And
"bulk" doesn't mean heavy food.
It’s a kind of food that isn’t con
sumed in the body, but leaves a
soft "bulky”mass in the intestines.
If this common form of con
stipation is your trouble, eat
Kellogg’s All-Bran regularly, and
drink plenty of water. All-Bran
isn’t a medicine-it’s a crunchy,
toasted cereal. And it will help
you not only to get regular but to
keep regular. Made by Kellogg’s
in Battle Creek. If your condition
is chronic, it is wise to consult
physician.
Two Eastern N. C. Men
Are Recommended For
Advancement In Navy
WASHINGTON, April 29. — OP) —
President Roosevelt today approved
a naval medical corps selection board
report recommending the promotion,
as vacancies occur, of 22 lieutenants
to lieutenant commander and eight
lieutenants, junior grade, to lieu
tenant.
Among officers selected for promo
tion, and their usual home address
were:
For lieutenant commander:
William F. E. Loftin, Mt. Olive,
N. C., and Bishop L. Malpass, Golds
boro, N. C.
Increase In Traffic
Deaths In U. S. Noted
CHICAGO, April 29. — (/P) — An
"alarming” increase in traffic deaths
brought a warning to American mo
torists today to “apply the brakes."
The national safety council re
ported 7,200 persons were killed in
motor vehicle accidents in the U.
S. during the first quarter of 1940—
450 or seven per cent more than in
the same period in 1939.
In March alone 2,440 fatalities
were recorded. That total was 11
per cent higher than in March of
last year.
DIVIDEND
GADSDEN, Ala., April 29.—('P)—
Goodyear Tire & Rubber directors
declared today a 25-cent dividend on
the common, payable June 15 to
holders of record May 15. This
brings to 75 cents the common dis
bursements for 1940. President P.
W. Eitchfield announced resignation
of George T. Bishop of Cleveland as
a director for reasons of health. A.
G. Cameron, veteran head of Good
year's foreign sales, was elected to
replace him.
cooperation on the part of state and
federal agencies will be needed if
these changes are to be made pru
dently and successfully.”
W. P. Horton of Pittsboro. demo
crat. spoke in Halifax and Edenton,
urging diversification in agriculture
and the adoption of measures to
improve the peanut industry.
“It is imperative that we do every
thing feasible to improve the mar
ket for peanuts,” he said.
Horton’s manager, Daniel Bell,
said the candidate wan taking no
part in the third term movement.
“Horton will actively support all the
nominees of the democratic party,
national, state and county,” he
added.
The Canadian jay lays its eggs
during weather 30 degrees below
zero.
Employment W eek Proclamation
Is Issued By Mayor T. E. Cooper
Designating the week of May 1 to
May 8 as National Employment
Week, Mayor Thomas E. Cooper,
who will continue his sound-truck
campaign for governor later in the
week, issued the following proclama
tion yesterday:
“The welfare and happiness of all
the people of the City of Wilming
ton are dependent upon the oppor
tunity which the employable head of
each family has to obtain gainful
employment. It is imperative that
all of us cooperate with the indus
trial, commercial, labor, civic, fra
ternal, church groups, the American
Legion., the North Carolina State
Employment Service and the Vete
rans’ Placement Service in a unified
effort to find or create work oppor
tunities for capable men and women.
“Those over forty are finding it
increasingly difficult to obtain
eludes heads of families, property
steady employment. This group in
owners, World war veterans, and
large numbers of loyal citizens who
have contributed greatly to the de
velopment of this state. By virtue of
their experience they have much to
offer employers in competence and
judgment.
“It is my desire to aid in alleviat
ing this deplorable condition. Let all
of us bring the unemployment pro
blem more forcibly to the attention
of all employers.
"Now, therefore, I, T. E. Cooper,
Mayor of Wilmington, in pursuance
of this effort, do hereby proclaim
the week of May 1 to May 8, 1940,
as National Employment Week, and
Sunday, May 5, as National Employ
ment Sunday, and urge all the peo
ple of Wilmington to give proper
consideration and encouragement to
this worthy program.”
OBITUARIES
Ehada Wright Wade, 49. ' un
ton, died Saturday, funeral Sun
day.
Angus Zeb Currie, 6”, Fay
etteville, died Sunday, funeral
Monday.
Mrs. Mozzell Culbreth, 64, Fay
etteville, died Saturday, funeral
Monday.
Mrs. J. A. Martin, 55. Lum
berton, died Friday, funeral Sun
day.
William H. Langston, 63,
Goldsboro, died Friday, funeral
Saturday.
G. H. CARTER
HAMPSTEAD, April 29.-Funer
al services for Gideon H. Carter,
35, of Plampstead, who died at 3:30
o’clock Sunday morning after a,
length}' illness, were held at 2
o’clock yesterday afternoon from the
late residence. Burial followed at
Neighborhood cemetery.
Services were conducted by the
Revs. L. C. Piner and J. L. Davis.
Mr. Carter is survived by his wife,
Mrs. Louise Batson Carter, three
children, Jewell, Allen and Joe;
his mother and father and several
brothers and sisters.
Active pallbearers were: R. E.
Batson, Woody Hall, Leonard
Thompson, R. B. Batson, Richard
Sidbury, Emmett Sassen.
Honorary: W. R. Harrell, H. E.
Andrews, D. M. Porter, D. W.
King, W. S. King, W. S. Dowless,
J. E. Sidbury, E. B. Blake, W. C.
Andrews and Joe Howard.
MRS. C. L. SKELTON
Mrs. C. L. Skelton, sister of Mrs.
J. W. Jackson of Wilmington, died
Sunday in Augusta, Ga.
Funeral services were conduct
ed from the St. Matthews Luther
an church in Augusta yesterday aft
ernoon at 3 o’clock.
In addition to her sister here,
Mrs. Skelton is survived by her
husband, four daughters and two
brothers, E. H. Diemmer, of
Brunswick, Ga., and M. J. Diem
mer, of Baltimore, Md.
She had been a lifelong resident
of Augusta.
O. H. WRIGHT
Funeral services for Oscar H.
Wright, 62, Atlanta, wholesaler who
was formerly a broker in Wilming
ton, were held Sunday afternoon
from Andrews Mortuary. Mrs. Elsie
C. Jones of the Christian Science
church officiated. Burial followed
at Oakdale cemetery.
Pallbearers were: A. M. Alder
fnan, T. A. Henderson, W. A. Whit
ney, Dr. L. J. Meredith, Ed Heins
berger, and Phillip Heinsberger.
Mr. Wright died Saturday at his
home in Atlanta. He is survived
by his wife; three sons, Egber,
Goodrich, and Oscar Jr., all of
Atlanta: one brother, R. K. Wright,
of Tabor City; and two sisters*
Mrs. Lillie Matthews of Raleigh,
and Mrs. Willie Richardson, of
Madison, Fla.
A resident of Wilmington for a
number of years, Mr. Wright mov
ed from here to Georgia some 30
years ago.
JOSEPH A. PASTERNACK
CHICAGO, April 2D.—GP)—Joseph
A. Pasternack, 59, radio orchestra
conductor, collapsed and died today
as he was beginning a rehearsal at
the National Broadcasting company
studios for his program scheduled
tonight.
Dr. Eugene Hamilton, summoned
from his office in the merchandise
mart, said Pasternack died ot heart
disease. The conductor came to Chi
cago last August and directed the
symphonic music for the (Carnation
Milk Co.) weekly program known as
the Contented Hour.
He W'as bom in Poland and came
to this country as a youth. He be
came a solo viola player with the
Metropolitan Opera company in New
York. Arturo Toscanini recommend
ed him as a conductor and he be
came one for "the Met.” Later he
directed symphony orchestras for
concerts and radio.
WILLIAM W. FLOWE
CHARLOTTE, April 2.—(.Pi
William Winslow Flowe, 66, Con
cord mill executive, died here to
day in a hospital. He was presi
dent of the Hugh Grey Hosiery
mills and the Hoover Hosiery mills
and was secretary and treasurer
of both the White Parks mill and
the Roberta Manufacturing com
pany. His widow and two children
survive.
E. C. MOORE
Funeral services for E. C. Moore,
St., 62, of 218 North Sixth street,
operator of a wholesale notions
business in AVilmington, who died
suddenly Saturday afternoon in Bal
timore, Md., were held at 4:30
o'clock yesterday afternoon from the
chapel of Andrews mortuary.
Dr. A. D. P. Gilmour, pastor of
the First Presbyterian church, con
ducted the services. Interment fol
lowed in Oakdale cemetery.
Active pallbearers were: O. H.
Young, Harry Payne, Graham Burk
heimer, J. G. McLelland, Theo Has
hagen and AV. L. Burkheimer.
Honorary pallbearers were: AV.
G. Farmer, Max AVarshauer, Marsh
all Starkey, AV. H. Pryde, R. H.
Bowden, Robert Tate, Albert Beach,
AVilliam Rosenman, Dr. V. T. Sul
livan, J. H. Bowden, Glasgow Hicks,
Colin S. Lewis and E. I. Bear.
Mr. Moore was born in Bladen
county July 1, 1877, the son of the
late Emanuel H. and Lula Robeson
Moore. He came to AVilmington as
a young man and for years was a
wholesale merchant in the' city ana
for the past 12 years he had been
owner and operator of E. C. Moore
and company.
He was a well-known businessman
throughout the state and also held
an executive office in the United
Commercial Travelers association.
He is survived by his wife and
the following children: Mrs. P. E.
Riley, Mrs. H. F. Converse, Miss
Nell Moore, John R. Moore, E. Clay
ton Moore, Jr., all of AVilmington,
Mrs. John Harrison, cf. Cincinnati,
Ohio, Mrs. J. K. Tadlock, of Tulsa,
Okla.; three brothers, George R.
Moore, of AVilmington, B. H. Moore,
of Tar Heel, and J. AAV Moore, of
Florence, S. C.; and two grandchil
dren.
St. Anne de Beaupre, Quebec,
the rvorld-famous shrine of mir
acles and curves, was founded by
grateful sailors in thanks to St.
Anne who had saved them from
shipwreck.
Young Columbus County
Man Escapes Drowning
WHITE VILLE, April 29.—Hubert
Newman, young man living near
Whiteville, had a narrow escape
from drowning Saturday afternoon
w'hen the sailboat which he was pi
loting alone overturned in the wa
ters of Lake WTaccamaw, about a
quarter of a mile from shore.
When the craft overturned, New
man attempted to swim to land, but
was overcome and disappeared be
neath the surface of the water.
Virgil Ray, of Hallsboro, was
standing on the shore, and swam
out to the rescue, and John L.
Moore, of Lake Waccamaw, rushed
to the scene with a boat, and picked
both Ray and the near-drowning
man up.
Newman was said to have been
unconscious for an hour before he
was finally revived through means of
artificial respiration.
CITY MANAGER NAMED
KANSAS CITY, April 29——L.
P. Cookingham, president of the In
ternational Association of City Man
agers, was appointed city manager
of Kansas City today. Cookingham,
now city manager of Saginaw,
Mich., was chosen by the new city
council which was elected early this
month in a “cleanup” campaign.
INSPECTION SLATED
RALEIGH, April 29— UP) —The
War department's annual inspection
of the R. O. T. C. regiment at N. C.
State college- v ill be held tomorrow
and Wednesday by Col. G. R. Mac
Kinzie, commandant of the David
son College Military department.
WTSPEED SUITS ME MM
I IN A RACING CAR
I BUT I WANT My I
| CIGARETTE SLOW- 1
1 BURNING. CAMELS I
1 BURN SLOWER. R
i GIVE ME THE'EXTRAS' I
, I IN SMOKING PLEASURE i
I— AND EXTRA SMOKING 1
1 FOR My MONE/, TOOl i
Ml. ^
BOB SWANSON
Midget Auto Racing Champion
WHETHER you smoke a lot
or a little, you’ll find several
definite "extras” in the slower
burning cigarette...Camel. You’ll
find freedom from the excess heat
and drying, irritating qualities of
too-fast burning... extra mildness
and extra coolness. You’ll find a cig
arette that doesn’t tire your taste
...for slower burning preserves the
full, rich flavor of Camel’s match-,
less blend of costlier tobaccos. At
the same time, you’ll be getting
the equivalent of extra smoking
from each pack!
In recent laboratory tests,
CAMELS burned 25% slow
er than the average of the
15 other of the largest-sell
ing brands tested — slower
than any of them. That
means, on the average, a
smoking plus equal to
^ EXTRA
''SMOKES
TER PACK/
\
FOR EXTRA MILDNESS,
EXTRA COOLNESS,
EXTRA FLAVOR.
CAMELS
SLOW
BURNING
COSTLIER TOBACCOS
“““——— {
i
What a thrill to win! .T'. What a pleasure to buy
and ownl. . . This new Westinghouse ARISTO
CRAT-SIX with TRU-ZONE COLD! With just
one setting of a simple control dial you can now
enjoy five kinds of refrigeration at once—the
RIGHT cold and humidity for every type of food.
(1) Low, sub-freezing temperature^ for FROZEN FOODS
)(2) Low temperatures with high humidity for MEATS
(3) Slightly higher temperatures for MILK and BEVER
‘‘L AGES
P (4) Safe “TRU-ZONE COLD” for staples
I (5) Moderate, crisping cold with high humidity for FRESH
/ FRUIT and VEGETABLES
tkaclutiue TRUE-TEMP CONTROL
. . . makes new TRU-ZONE COLD possible; gives you the
surer, steadier cold that makes humidity safe. Be sure to see
this new feature in the 1940 Westinghouse Refrigerators.
See the five distinct zones of cold! Drop in TODAYI
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"Advise-a-Bride" CONTESTS jiltSiTjr,
5 Big Weekly Contests, April 18...May 23 IVestinghouse Refrigerator or
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50 WesHnghouse Streamline Irons
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Belk’s Annual Sale
Summer House Furnishings
Great Value
READY MADE
DRAPES
S1.E9~S1.98
READY TO HANG
Made especially for beach
cottages. Cut 36 in. x 2
1-2 yds. long, and 50 in.
by 2 1-2 yds. long. Crash
es, cretonnes, chintz, sat
een, homespun. Many
beautiful colors in florals
and itripes.
Grass Rugs $3.95 & $6.95
Heavy grass rugs, bound on ends. Come in
many aatractive colors, modern designs, florals and
bordered.
[_,
CHAIR PADS
Give your metal chair add
ed comfort with a water
proof pad, made to fit most
low back metal chairs, round
or square.
p
Each
4
CANVAS
CHAIR RECOVERS
39c and 48c
Complete with ropes to
loop over old frame ends.
Easily attached. Several
colors to select from.
CANNON TURKISH TOWELS
NO. 1 SECONDS jPj
$1.75 Doz- |
15c each 8
22x24, most popular*
of all sizes in the K
average home for 'M
baths. Woven from 11
sturdy cotton yarns ■
that assure you the ||
practical wear you ra
want. Attractive col- if
ored borders. "
GLIDER REPLACEMENT
CUSHIONS
$6.50 - $8.95 - $9.95
Change your faded worn
glider to a new one at 1-3
cost of a new glider. Set of
6 cushions, 3 backs and 3
seats, to fit all standard glid
ers. In selected striped or
figured materials. Water re
pellent.
GLIDER SLIP
COVERS
$1.98, $2.48, $2.98
6 pc. Cover, 3 backs, 3 seats. 1
pc. to fit any number cushions.
32 PC.
Collage Sets
$3-95
Six attractive patterns
to select from. Colors to
blend with any color
scheme. 6 breakfast
plates 6 bread and but
ter plates, 6 fruit dishes,
6 cups, 6 saucers, 1 plat
ter, 1 serving dish.
MIRRORS
$1.29
Oval, round and rectangu
lar mirrors, framed in gilt
frames, suitable for mantles,
dressing tables and buffets.
SILVER PLATE
10c and 12c
Inexpensive silver plated
flat ware for your summer ;
cottage. Knives, forks, tea
spoons, ice tea spoons, table
spoons, salad forks, and soup
spoons.
_ __

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