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The Wilmington morning star. (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, May 05, 1940, Image 3

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1940-05-05/ed-1/seq-3/

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jHEXICO REJECTS
OIL ARBITRATION
(Continue* From Page One)
•r interests “represent approxi
mately 4,J Per cent of the tavest
T" nts’ of American interests in the
i industry.” New York financial
0 -les estimate that Standard Oil
Cf New Jersey, Standard Oil oi
®L. York, and the Sinclair group
■ -estments are valued at $200,
S qoo, of which only approximate
Jv $16,000,000 is owned by the Sin
clair group
The Mexican note promised that
. iiar settlements would be made
/th the other American oil com
ics whose properties had been
expropriated.
General Hay charged, however,
,bat long delays had resulted from
Vtructionist tactics by the Amer
?°n companies “which have sys
tematically refused to allow the
lue of their properties to be de
termined. whether in the friendly
manner proposed by Mexico
through private negotiations or be
fore the competent courts.”
“By All Means”
The companies, the note alleged,
>‘bv all means at their disposal,
have prevented the attainment of
a knowledge of the amount of the
Lomnitv. an absolutely indispens
able requisit for being able to af
fect payment.”
The note charged the companies
v.ere directing their efforts “to
wards delaying the settlement of
the dispute, by which means they
have caused serious economic in
jury to Mexico and to the commer
cial relations between our two
countries—even going so far as to
cherish the hope that these differ
ences. which ought not to exceed
the bounds of a dispute between the
government and a group of private
companies, should weaken the
bonds of friendship which unite
our two peoples.”
MEXICO CITY, May 4.—(rP)—
United States Ambassador Jose
phus Daniels visited President Car
denas tonight for what was describ
ed as a farewell call prior to Dan
jets' departure for a stay at his
home in Raleigh, N. C.
MVY~wilTSEND
AMPHIBIAN HERE
! (Continued From Page One)
dedication ceremonies are rapidly
nearing completion.
The NYA seaplane base landing
float, located on the northern slip
of the city-owned Liberty ship
yards. will be formally launched
and dedicated with appropriate ex
ercises at 2 o’clock Friday after
noon. A number of out-of-town rep
resentatives are expected to attend
the ceremonies.
Commissioner Wade said invita
tions to attend had been extended
to the following: Captain Robert S.
Fogg, seaplane consultant of the
Civil Aeronautics authority; John
A. Lang, of Raleigh, administration
official of the National Youth ad
ministration in North Carolina;
Addison Hewlett, chairman to the
board of county commissioners; W.
Louis Fisher, commissioner of fi
nance; J. K. Sumner, represent
ing the chamber of commerce, and
army and navy officials in the
Wilmington vicinity.
_CITY RELIEF GARDENER_
cabbVL ofpL’ „ ' V ot the garden program, examines the
farc hp Lf H°"ard’ ,,eg1ro- of Brooklyn alley, who, despite the
nirt in the ,?," 'V °"e es a,u 0,le °f ,lis eyes is missing, has taken
HoL„'Il’L o 5,os,anl ev.ery year Slllre u "as started four years ago.
S * s. garden was judged “excellent” by Rehder, who says that
vegetaf'iles* from !,is LT.'t,1”* well as his family, with
GOERING CLAIMS
BATTLESHIP SUNK
(Continued From Page One)
him say he lias waited for weeks
for just this test as conclusive proof
that the German air force can ac
complish any task set for it and
that it has, in German eyes, “once
and for all destroyed the myth of
British mastery of the seas.”
There are five battleships of the
Queen Elizabeth class: the War
spite, flagship of Vice-Admiral Wil
liam ,Tock Whitworth, which on
April 13 led the British fleet which
smashed into Narvik fjord and sank
seven destroyers; the Queen Eliza
beth. Valiant, Barham and Malaya,
all of approximately 30,000 tons and
carrying complements of more than
1,100 men.
Up to now Britain has admitted
the loss of no capital ships to air
action; it has, however, conceded
the sinking of the sloop Bittern and
the destroyer Gurkha by air bombs
since the start of the Norwegian
campaign, and damage to various
other vessels.
Today's brief announcement of
the battleship’s destruction said it
was proceeding on a westerly coast
of Namsos yesterday afternoon when
the German dive bombers swooped
down on it, dropping heavy bombs.
Between Turrets
“It was hit . . . between the for
ward turrets." said the communi
que. ‘'Half a minute after the bombs
hit, shooting flames flared 500 met
ers high amidst great clouds of
smoke. After the clouds disappeared
there was nothing more of the ship
to be seen except debris.”
Single bomb, German experts said,
must have hit a powder magazine
on the warship, although others
were dropped.
The impression was that the bat
tleship was shielding the departure
of British troops from Namsos. They
embarked Thursday night.
No sooner had the power diver
unit reported the feat to Goering
than he hurried to the Reichs chan
cellery to tell Adolf Hitler about it.
The two decided, then, to with
hold the news until Saturday noon
“to see whether Churchill (British
first lord of the admiralty) will have
the courage to admit this terrific
loss.”
Churchill, however, said nothing.
"For some time we have been
waiting for an opportunity to prove
to the world that even a battleship
can be sunk by air raiders,’’ said
one man in the know today.
“General Erhardt Milch, secretary
of state in the air ministry, went
personally to Norway with orders
from the Fuehrer and Goering that,
if and when the hour for the test
came, a battleship must be sunk,
come what may.
“We are simply amazed, our
selves, that the experiment succeed
ed without so much as a single
loss for us. Gur airforce was deter
mined to send wave after wave of
power divers into action and to con
tinue tlie assault, even if at first,
every attacking plane was shot
down.
“In our fondest dreams we didn't
think it possible that the job could
be completed in less than three min
utes without the loss of a single
plane.”
Germany has claimed that at least
98 British naval ships have been
“sunk, destroyed or set afire” by
Nazi air and naval action and mines
in the eight month period from
Sept. 3, 1939, to May 3, 19-10, an un
official compilation showed tonight.
The list, drawn up from army com
muniques and DNB (official Ger
man news agency) summaries and
including development^ which were
reported today follows:
Two battleships, including the
Royal Oak.
The airplane carrier Courageous.
Eleven cruisers, including the aux
iliary ship Rawalpindi.
(British have acknowledged the
loss of tlie Royal Oak, the Coura
geous anu the Rawalpindi, but had
admitted to the loss of only the one
At least 17 destroyers.
Twenty-four troop transports.
Twenty-two submarines.
Twenty-one vessels in the mine
sweeping patrol service.
The summary does not include
warships claimed to have been put
out of action by damages.
The authoritative Jane’s "Fighting
Ships” gives Great Britain’s naval
strength as of September, 1939 (com
pleted ships only'/ as 15 capital ships
(battleships ana battle cruisers), six
aircraft carriers, 15 heavy cruisers,
43 other cruisers, six anti-aircraft
ships, 179 destroyers, 57 submarines,
and 26 motor torpedo boats.
GREECE WORRIED
BY FLEET REPORT
(Continued From Page One)
for training will be sent to the Al
banian frontier, whence Italy con
ceivably might launch a drive if she
enters the war.
At the same time German sources
reported that Greek police had raid
ed a secret British radio station in
Athens which had been sending me
teorological reports to British war
ships. This could not he confirmed
officially in Athens.
Yugoslavs received new if unof
ficial assurances that Italy has no
designs on their country.
Tension in Dalmata, across the
Adriatic sea from Italy, diminished
somewhat as the fascist newspaper
in Fiume, II Gazetta Di Fiume,
which has a wide Yugoslav circu
lation, said:
“Italy has no aspirations toward
Yugoslavia. Italy’s preparations are
directed only against events in the
Mediterranean.”
At Ankara, the Turkish capital,
German Ambassador Franz Von Pa
pen postponed indefinitely his tri
to Berlin to report to Chanceilor
Hitier on the situation in the Near
East. In Istanbul, Turkish police
announced the release of Prof. Hans
Von Osten, one of five Germans ar
rested on suspicion of espionage and
spreading German propaganda, be
cause of failure to prove charges
against him.
It has been estimated that ap
proximately one-half of the fisher
men of the world are Japanese.
BRITISH CONTINUE
SILENT ON CLAIMS
(Continued From Page One)
discreetly silent and official quar
ters declined comment on Ger
many’s claim of having sunk a
battleship of the Queen Elizabeth
class in a bombing attack off
Norway Friday, unofficial military
sources reported that “Britain will
continue fighting in Norway with
great vigor.”
Well-informed quarters describ
ed the German claims as "of a
fantastic character to which the
public fast is becoming accustom
ed.”
These sources also revealed de
tails of the unsuccessful attempts
to capture. Trondheim.
“Allies Failed’’
They admitted that “the Allies
failed to anticipate” Germany’s
lightning move into Denmark and
Norway and thus were left with a
force “which never had been de
signed or intended to land against
opposition forces.”
These sources reported that ter
ritorial troops, similar in training
and equipment to the United States
national guard, were the “spear
head of our troops in the first
landings” in Norway and “formed
the bridge heads through which
more trained and experienced
troops would pass.”
Military circles nevertheless were
optimistic about the situation in
Narvik, the ore port north of the
Arctic Circle where Allied troops
are beleaguering a German garri
son.
FACES TEST
PARIS, May 4.— CP) —Premier
Paul Reynaud's government tonight
appeared to be facing a secret air
ing in the chamber of deputies of
the reasons for the Allied with
drawal from central and southern
Norway.
A secret meeting became almost
certain when two deputies of par
ties supporting the government fil
ed notices- which would open de
bate on military strategy.
Despite increased demand for an
immediate session, it appeared un
likely that the chamber would
meet before its scheduled date,
May 16.
RED MEN WILL
MEET ON MAY 13
(Continued From Page One)
expected to be present: M. C. Brad
ley, Great Sachem, Charlotte; E. M.
A, Wollard, Great Senior Sagamore,
Rocky Mount; M. W .Henderson,
Great Junior Sagamore, Kannapolis;
A. S. Hollowell, Great Prophet, Ed
enton; W. Ben Goodwin, Great
Chief of Records, Elizabeth City; E.
P. H. Strunck, Great Keeper of
Wampum. Wilmington; A. C. Cut
ler, Great Sannap, Washington; S.
A. Satterfield, Great Mishinewa,
Pineville; G. A. Morris, Great Guard
of Wigwam, Farmville; and J. F.
Adams, Great Guard of Forest, Mac
clesfield. Addison Hewlett, Jr., of
Wilmington is a member of the judi
ciary committee.
The Great Chiefs
Great Chiefs of the Degree of Po
cohontas are: Mrs. Marie Wallace,
Great Pocohontas, Gastonia; Mrs.
Sarah Tucker, Great Prophetess,
Greenville; Mrs. Elizabeth Cox,
Great Wenonah, Elizabeth City;
Mrs. Minnie Davis, Great Keeper
of Records, Elizabeth City; Mrs.
Pat Johnson, Great Minnehaha,
Charlotte; Mrs. Lillie Aycock, Great
Keeper of Wampum, Kannapolis;
Mrs. Opal Bateman, First Great
Scout. Leaksville; Mrs. Jennie
Hawkins. Second Great Scout, Gas
tonia; Mrs. Effie Chilton, Great
Guarde of Tepee, Reidsviile; and
Mrs. Carrie Roberts, Great Guard
of Forest. Kannapolis.
The local committee for arrange
ments includes; W. E. Yopp, chair
man ; Mrs. Liliie Pearl Smith, vice
chairman; K .S. Mallard, secretary
and treasurer; J. L. Buck, J. R.
Melton, A. M. Newber, Mrs. Ivey
Barnett, Mrs. Myrtle Canfield, Ad
dison Hewlett, Jr., and Joseph Bar
berri.
All Wilmington business firms
have been requested to put out their
flags on Monday, May 13, opening
day of the convention.
ITAUANS WARN
ALLIES OF FIGHT
\
(Continued From Page One)
taking” it will find Italy’s reaction
“prompt and strong.”
Tonight the official gazette dis
closed that the war ministry has
been given an extra 8,000,000,000
lir ($400,000,000) for "extraordinary
expense.” Half this sum is under
stood to cover sums spent or to
be spent both in 1939 and 1940; the
other half was added to the 1940
41 budget. The cabinet approved the
outlay recently “to increase the
warlike efficiency of the army.’’
Gayda said Italy is resolved “to
face and repulse any threat from
whatever point it comes.”
He declared the Mediterranean is
keeping “completely quiet” but
that the Italian nation does not
yet really understand “exactly
what particular design inspired the
joint decision of England and
France to reinforce their war fleet
in the Mediterranean.”
Italian newspapers suddenly gave
prominence to the official Italian
report of Allied naval movements,
issue after the Allied battle fleet
had reached Alexandria, Egypt,
near the Suez Canal.
They suggested Britain and
France are trying to find a new
war front in the Balkans and the
Mediterranean after their defeat
in l^orway.
OIL FIRMS PLAN ~
HUGE PIPE UNE
(Continued From Page One)
currently are going over the pro
posed project, but plans have not as
yet reached the point where they
may be submitted to the three
builders for final approval.
Such a line, if constructed, would
need authorization of the interstate
commerce commission, and also of
the various states through which
it would pass.
The line, according to present
plans, would run from Baton Rouge,
La., to the Carolinas.
It would be a carrier of gasoline
and other refined oil products.
HINCKLEY TO GET
COMMERCE POST
(Continued From Page One)
jected to the authority’s taking over
duties of the air safety board.
The issues will be threshed out
next week when congress considers
a resolution to junk the reorgani
zation plan.
Hinckley would succeed Monroe
Johnson, who has been named to
the Interstate Commerce commis
sion, as a commerce department of
ficial.
3,841 REGISTER
IN NEW HANOVER
(Continued From Page One)
posts only one more Saturday, but
voters may enter their names upon
the books by calling at the regis
trars’ homes during the week.
H. G. Carney, chairman of the
county board of elections, yester
day expressed the hope at least
9,000 or 10.000 people will register
for the ballots. He urged that Wil
mingtonians register as early as
possible.
^Hi
DUTCH ROUND UP
‘FIFTH COLUMN’
(Continued From Page One)
Premier Derek Jan de Geer, who
considered them so important he
broadcast the news by radio to the
Dutch East and West Indies, as
well as the homeland.
He compared the arrested men
to the Dutchmen \?ho helped put
Holland under French influence a
century and a half ago.
The group was rounded up in
raids last night in The Hague, Haar
lem and Amsterdam. Communists
and members of other political par
ties beside the Dutch Nazis were
among those reported arrested. All
were interned.
The only prominent Nazi arrest
ed was M. M. Rost van Tonningen,
chief editor of the Nationale Dag
blad, widely circulated National So
cialist newspaper and a member of
the Second chamber of parliament.
He is well known in The Nether
lands for his work as representa
tive of the League of Nations on
Austrian finance some years ago.
He joined the National Socialist par
ty in Holland in 1936.
De Geer said all those arrested
were taken into custody because of
personal activities and not because
of their political views. The meas
ures, he added, were taken under
nation-w'ide martial law because
those arrested “endanger the secur
ity of The Netherlands.”
“They undermine confidence in
our firm will to resist every vio
lation of our territory,” he said.
Automobiles consume less gaso
line when the tires are inflated to
the proper pressure.
SAVE! SAVE! SAVE!
Renew your fire or auto insur
ance in a strong non-assessable
mutual company. Current savings
25 per cent.
F. E. LIVINGSTON & CO.
MUTUAL INSURANCE
I
i tinier.
Fragments to Individuals
The sea-anemone is an animal
that resembles a plant. As it
moves, parts of its broad “foot”
adhere to the surface of rocks and
are torn off, and the' fragments
grow into complete new anemones.
Late Doctor's Discovery
For Stomach Ulcer Pain
Thousands are paying tribute to
the memory of a famous doctor
whose discovery has brought them
relief from acid stomach ulcer pains.
He discovered that coating the
stomach lining with bismuth would
protect the sensitive parts against
the irritating action of foods and
digestive secretions. Udga Tablets
contain bismuth and other valuable
ingredients in a balanced formula.
They have been praised by thou
sands. Try a 25c box of Udga for
relief of ulcer and stomach pains,
indigestion, gas pains, heartburn,
burning sensation, bloat and other
conditions caused by excess acid.
Udga Tablets are safe to use and
must help or your money refunded.
At Saunders and good drug stores
every where. — Adv.
Special!
Lubrication
& Cleaning
This Week Only
S3.25
LABOR ONLY
INCLUDES:
1. WASHING CAR
2. WASHING MOTOR
3. VACUUM CLEANING UPHOLSTERY
4. LUBRICATING ENTIRE CAR
| 5 TESTING BATTERY
6. AIR TIRES
7. DRAIN RADIATOR AND REFILL
8. CHECK REAR AXLE ASSEMBLY
0. CHECK TRANSMISSION
10. CALL FOR AND DELIVER CAR
the ABOVE SPECIAL PRICE IS FOR CHEVROLETS ONLY!
Raney Chevrolet Co.
406-408 Princess Si. Phone 896-897-898
USED BUILDING MATERIAL
FOR SALE
Framing, Windows and Doors, Flooring, Sheathing j
Just the right material for your Beach Cottage. See me on the
job “Old Jacobi Home” croner 3rd and Grace Street. This House
now being wrecked.
S. W. SEBRELL, CONTRACTOR
2500 PRINCESS ST. ROAD PHONE 3025-J
“MOA for the Motorist”
Motorists Oil Association, Inc.
A NORTH CAROLINA CORPORATION <
PETROLEUM PRODUCTS — TIRES
BATTERIES — SERVICING
Watch For Opening Date
’KmllBeln
Suggestions for Mother's
Happiness
white doeskin gloves I AC
perfectly styled __ * ■* ”
Pure Irish linen hankies 9Cm
exquisite quality ___ ■**
White handbags of tailored kid
including I AC
cleaner-kit -___
BEAUTIFUL SATIN SLIPS
Panel, 4 gored and bias cut styles, tearose ADf*
and white—for Mother _•tllW
GOTHAM GOLDSTRIPE HOSE
An ideal Mother’s Day gift. 2,
3, and 4 thread hose in all
S„ 1.00 * 1.15
GOING, GOING
The Anniversary Sale is almost over. Don’t fail to take ad
vantage of the special values NOW!
NEW
Bemberg Sheer
DRESSES
Lovely sheer prints in fa
mous washable Benberg sheer
—pique and lace collars,
pleated and gored skirts and
colorful bouquet trims. Sizes
18 to 44,
695
EVENING
DRESSES
Gossamer Marquisette, net laces and
crisp "Ladyship" crepe evening
dresses. Exquisitely styled and tail
ored to perfection. Colors are soft pas
tel, flower prints, and black. Formals
for fashionable women—
7-95 to
19.50
BOYS’ NEW WASH SUITS
“Laddie Boy” wash suits for boys—pastel colors In durable fabrics
smartly tailored, sizes 3-9. Special Anniversary value.
CHILDREN'S NOVELTY MAGAZINE
SHEER DRESSES DOOR STOPS RACKS
Printed and solid colored sheer Sculptured animals, flower . ,. _.
dresses in a variety of attractive pieces and colored “mammy" Another fine gift for mother,
new spring styles. Sizes are 3- doorstops in bright enameled Sturdily made and beautifully
6% and 7 to 14. iron! finished magazine racks.
48c & 97c 97c to 3.95 97c to 1.95
UTILITY BEDROOM flntllPC Hamnarc
CABINETS amperS I
Hampers of many shapes, in
Perfect for shoes or undies, eluding attractive corner type
ssnsfrs cSS?..ln
1.45 & 1.95 Sr 97c *° 4'95

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