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The Wilmington morning star. [volume] (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, May 31, 1940, Image 11

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Buy? Rent, Sell With Want Ads For Quick, Economical Results—Call 2800
i jhe Wilmington Star
classified rates
„ ,.s.sried ads inserted in both
A wilm’ngton News and The Wil
The | Star. Insertion ol
! in be°on same day or evening
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Iirst proud insertion will run Mon
i thea News. No classified ads sold
i f'He'? per only.
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I .we rate-Me per line
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| up///,j’ad3 will be received by
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t , will be sent next day.
6 Count five average words to the
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Xce. or if by telephone, must be
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rnDer classification and to the reg
ar STAR-NEWS style of type.
Errors in advertisements should
be reported immediately. The Star
ves will not be responsible for
i,ore than one incorrect insertion.
No ad taken for less than basis of
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Cards of thanks charged for at
rate ol cents per line. Count five
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A charge of $5.00 is made for pub
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sDonsibility for any advertisement
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Ask For Ad-Taker.
" NOTICE TO PUBLIC
All advertising appearing in these
columns is for reputable and reh
ab e concerns, so fa. as we can
ascertain from a careful investiga
tion.
i it our Intention, however, to
see that every firm that uses these
columns is required to live up to
their obligations. Therefore, should
you reply to any advertisement on
this page and set vices are not ren
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The 0. S- postal regulations are
very strict in such -natters as such
an act would be misuse of the U. S.
mail and the Star-News will see
I that any attempt to defraud is
promptly handled by the P. O- de
; partment.
1 Announcements
GARMENTS ALTERED. SUITS
mace to measure. Selection tailor
ed pants. New York Tailoring,
202 Princess St., Phone 395.
2 Automotive
FOR SALE AT SACRIFICE ONE
Kabin Koach Trailer. Coastal Serv
ice Station, 3rd and Grace.
1839 PACKARD SEDAN, PERFECT
condition. Radio and heater. Bar
gain.
MacMillan Buick-Pontiae Co.
Phone 345,
1334 CHEVROLET PANEL TRUCK.
Excellent value. See today. Pet
erson-Barnes Motor Co., Phone
1427.
FOR SALE - CHRYSLER 5-PAS
senger, 6-cylinder sedan. Perfect
condition. Sacrifice, $150. 1205
Market, Phone 2635,
SNOW'S ESSO SERVICENTER
Dodge & Plymouth Sales & Service
3rd & Market. Phones' 1493-9130
WESTBROOK - B R OWN MOTOR
Co., Inc., Home of Chrysler and
Plymouth, 113 No. 2nd St„ Phone
I860,
CHEVROLET SALES & SERVICE
406-108 Princess Street
Raney Chevrolet Company
1940 CHEVROLET MASTER DE
*uxe Too n Sedan. Radio; heater.
Low mileage. Harris Haskett,
. '-LQ. Mauldin Motor Co.
1S'?i™0DEL A F0EE ROADSTER;
4J-9 Packard Sedan. Will .sell
l £leaP for cash. Robert’s Used Car
f _ Exchange.
13f OLDSMOEILE COUPE. COME
“r demonstration.
danPACKARD 120 TOUEIXG SE
Both are bargains!
-lany other good used cars
LONG MOTOR CO.
-lIa'0 2nd St. Phone 72
'— -—_
“__ Guilders
BonL». ! SPECIAL PRICES
Beach t C5tases at Wrightsville
tractor LroT' Ro=ers’ General Con
—Phone 253.
!?_Builders' Supplies
Ctal innpL W0RKS- SPECIALIZ
factim r‘ames and Screen. Satis
J^p^aranteed. 1207 Princess
^Buiiaers^B^ Y0Xj NEED IN
try nS SPPPliea. we have it! Ev
j Promt-/,,?r receives courteo is.
E tvrap‘attention.
-^20£WIN-S SONS, PHONE 562
your hnZERI0RATI0N! PAINT
2 vears ?le " lth Perfection. 1 to
JX_Pho4 155' North-Smith Coal
Dl®.B Ww- RUBRIC AND
! American t, atlon- Estimates.
i -1/Market 2tmeplmProVement C°'
let estimitUR BUSINESS. SO
/c'u:renient«ttr?d q/ote 011 your
—670 Ca&e Fear Lurnber
EXASC° TEST ROOFING
„ Dura hi Beautiful
Best hr x<4?t w Economical
-1/ Wnti;a/0Ver Iron Works
Phone 600
„ ' t'io4l4nVIOR ^REPLACE
B°me p/ew comfort for your
Aafe'toinrtaU-sIveB
BeckerV Phone 82 Flreplace cost.
13 Boats
JOHNSON SEA HORSE OUTBOARD
Motor 22 H. P., bargain. Also 14
ft. Dunphy boat. Both practically
new, Howell Motor Co.
Weld Wood Skiffs and Moth Boats
Stock and Custom Built
Cash or Terms
MARINE SERVICE, INC.
Wrightsville, N, C„ Phone 7771
14 Bnsiness Opportunities
SMALL BAKERY FOR SALE AT
very reasonable price. Doing good
business. Located at 923 North
4th Street.
35 Drags
FIGHT THAT COLD. GET A BOT
tle of Prescription No. 7. For
colds and coughs. Helps to clear
the head, mild laxative. Price,
25c. Brooklyn Pharmacy, 4th and
Bladen Sts„ Phone 1330,
41 Eatables
'FISH
FRESH DAILY
BEST—CHEAPEST
(SMALL OR LARGE ORDERS')
EXPERT DRESSER
Vegetables
ALL VARIETIES
Meats
AND FULL LINE
Groceries
PEARCE
SIS X. 4th St. Phone 2796
INSTANT DELIVERY
FISH, MEAT. GROCERIES, \ EGE
tables, all varieties. Pearce’s
Quick Delivery, 818 North Fourth
street. Phone 2796.
•u taxing races
"THE HOME OF GOOD EATS."
Fried Chicken, Bar-B-Q conceded
best steak. Capt. Ben’s, Phone
5813, _
48Feeds
TO RAISE BIG, HUSKY, DEEP
chested pullets with strength .o
la? Big eggs for several seasons
fted Ful-O-Pep Growing Mash.
■J. J. Allen # Son. Phone 380.
TUXEDO QUALITY FEEDS.
"Quality Has No Substitute. ’ Feed
Tuxedo "'--i Best Feed For
Every Need." Cross Seed Co.
Phone 1111.
52-A Resorts
FOR RENT — WRIGHTSVILLE
Beach cottage, very attractive
price. June 1st to 8th. Phone
2411-R,
62 AUGUSTA STREET. WRIGHTS
ville Beach, 8 bedrooms, 3 baths.
Excelien, condition. Apply Samuel
Bear, Sr., and Son. 311 No. Front.
55 For Rent, Apartments
STEAM HEATED THREE ROOMS,
hardwood floors, bath, garage and
private entrances; 1802 Market.
Phone 1306-M.
FOR RENT—FURNISHED APART
ment, Wrightsville Sound, facing
Marine Railway. Reasonable.
Phone 7345.
226 SOUTH FRONT ST. 5 ROOMS
upper apt. and bath. Steam heat
ed. Garage. Call 9147 day; 1028
night.
TWO LARGE NICELY FURNISH
ed rooms, private bath, 806 Orange
street. Five rooms unfurnished
down stairs, 320 South Sixth street.
Apply 806 Orange Street
FOR RENT ON
MARKET ST. ROAD
OPPOSITE BROOK WOOD AVE.
Duplex apartment with five
rooms and bath. Very de
sirable location. Possession
on June 15th.
MOORE-FONVIELLE
REALTY COMPANY
201 Princess St. Phones 97-98
LOWER APARTMENT, 4 ROOMS,
bath and kitchen. Available June
1st. 421 South Fifth St. L. C.
LeGwin.
80 For Rent, Rooms
LARGE CORNER ROOM. PRIVATE
bath with shower. Private en
trance. Garage. Apply 208 So. 3.
65 For Rent, Houses
410 NORTHERN BLVD., SUNSET
Park. Five room house in very
good condition. Reasonable. Foster
Hill Realty Co. Phones 1467-1468.
314 SO. 17TH ST., 6 ROOM BUNGA
'.dw. Apply Willetts Realty Co.
Phone 304-342._
70 For Sale
3 PAIR OF LADIES SHOES FOR
$1.45 (Mostly narrow widths) also
first quality ladies’ full fashioned
hose for 38c at Dlugin’s, 10 South
Front St.
MOTOROLA AUTO RADIOS, $24.95
up. New models. Beautiful recep
tion. Easy terms. Goodrich Silver
town Stores.
ICE—Full Weight. Prompt Delivery
McKEE BROS.
710 Castle St. Phone 356
BEST FRICTION BELTS
2 inch width, 14c per foot.
4 inch width, 26c per foot.
6 inch vidth, 40c per foot.
8 inch width, 65c per foot.
10 inch width, 95c per foot.
Shaft Boxes. Pulleys. Etc.
LINGO METAL WORKS
-ENETIAN BLINDS—FOR OFFICE
or Home. Standard size or made
to order. $4.50 up. Edwin J. Far
relly’s.
EVERYTHING YOU NEED FOR
Fresh and Salt Water Fishing!
W’ilmington Cycle Co., 114 Market
St. Phone 526,
GIVE THE YOUNG LADY GRAD
uate a Lane Cedar Hope Chest. See
Window Display. Peoples’ Furni
ture Co. 213 No. Front St.
MEN YOU CAN DRESS WElT
and save real money on your en
tire clothing bill at Finkelstein’s
Front and Market,
70 For Sale
BARGAINS—RADIOS
MODELS TAKEN ON TRADE
Battery and 110 Volt Sets To Be
Sold for Amount Allowed on
Trade-In.
Radios m fin
THRIF-T-STORES, INC.
25 So. Front St. Phone 726
12 ir PORCELAIN GENERAL
Electric Refrigerator. Bargain for
$100. Gregg’s Appliance, 115 Mar
ket Street.
FISHERMEN ATTENTION! COM
pl-te stock Pflueger and Penn
reels .rods, line. Special—Fishing
tackle 2 for 25c. Cooperative Hdwe.
610 Castle St.
73 Hardware
CHROMIUM PLATED TRIM, BIND
ings, edgings and mouldings. Con
tinuous strips. Cut to measure.
Wide variety. Gregg Bros. Hdwe.
Phone 632.
-———-—... ...
75 Household Goods
CLOSEOUT—KELVINATOR ELEC
tric Range, standard model, §80.
Also 3 used ice boxes. Bargains. C.
B. Wessell, 305 No. Front St.
ONE ANTIQUE 4 POST CANOPY'
Also used bed suitable for beach.
Phone 7545.
SPECIAL SALE ON BEACH FUR
niture! Folding cots and mat
tresses $5.95. Also Porch Furniture.
Carolina Furniture Co., 617 North
Fourth St. Phone 2283.
" Frigidaire FEIGIDAIRE
LOWEST PRICE IN HISTORY
6 Cu. Ft.
Size, only _
LOW DOWN PAYMENT
ii
Sutton-Council Furniture Co
SPECIAL SALE INNERSPRING
Mattresses. Price $16.95 up. Terms
$1.00 weekly. Alarm clock free
with each mattress. See window
d'spiay. Jones Furniture Co., IS
So. Front St.
FREE — LOVELY 18x36 or 27x36
Crescent Seal Scatter Rug with
Each Gold Seal Congoleum Rug.
Limited Offer! Pender Furniture
Co. 28 So. Front St.
WHATEVER YOU NEED FOR
your bdach cottage, we have it.
Bost Furniture Co.. 29 S. Front St.
ICE REFRIGERATORS, FLOE
ence Oi! cook stoves, breakfast
room suites. Greatly reduced
prices. Castle St. Furniture Co..
714 Castle St.
GIVE THE GRADUATE A GUAR
anteed Cavalier Cedar Chest.
Priced $14.95 and up. Home Fur
niture Co. 23 Market St.
SEE THE 1940 NORGE ROYAL
Rollator Refrigerators; Norge
Steri-Seal Washers. Easy l..m
Sneeden-Y'ork 119 Market St.
80 Houses For Sale
OCEAN FRONT COTTAGE $2600—
will accept vacant lot as down pay
ment, balance $25 per month.
Phone 474. P. O. Box 1058.
SUPER - VALUE
233 Kenwood Ave.
SUBSTANTIAL REDUCTION
IN PRICE FOR THIS NEW
AND MODERN SIX ROOM
HOME. OIL HEAT; HARD
WOOD FLOORS. MODERN
IX EVERY’ RESPECT.
Foster-Hill Realty Co.
Salesmen
Edw. B. Allen
L. E. Alien B. B. Bryan
7 ROOM HOUSE, BEAUTIFUL
lot, 10 No. 10th St. Low price.
W. M. Hewlett, Realtor, 214 Prin
cess St.. Phone 943.
ATTRACTIVE 5 ROOM BUNC V
low 209 No. 11th St. Large lot.
Priced low for quick sale. Phone
145. W. A. Davis. W. A. Mc
Girt, Agency, 217 Princess St.
85 Help Wanted, Male
WANTED COOK, MUST HAVE
health certificate. Eli’s restaurant,
Happyday cottage, Station 1.
Wrightsville Beach.
YOUNG MAN EXPERIENCED IN
selling hardware. In applying state
age, (• reference, experience and
salary expected. Box W-14 care of
Star-News.
WANTED — EXPERIENCED MO
tor truck salesman. Mail applica
tions with references to P. O. Boy
957, City.
32.468 PRINTING AND PUBLISH
ing plants in the U. S. employing
500.000 trained people. We offer
training in Hand Composition,
Linotvpe, Presswork, Monotype.
Using more than $100,000 worth of
equipment to train you in a scnool
controlled by printers and publish
ers. Not operated for profit. Write
Southwest Vocational School. 3800
Clarendon Drive. Dallas, Texas.
95 Insurance
Hinton Insurance & Realty Co.
General Insurance—Lewis P. Hinton
210 1-2 Princess St. Phone 209
100 Insirnclion
COMPTOMETER. STENOTYPY
and all business subjects taught.
Mrs. Motte's Secretarial School.
313 Church Street.
105 Last and Found
RODERICK & LAND. MFGRS.
doors, sashes, windows, door
frames, screens, turned columns,
balusters. 17th & Castle. Phone
446-J _
110 Livestock
MANY FINE YrOUNG MULES FOR
sale now and through the summer,
j. p. Newton, Wilmington, N. C.
Phone 2006-J._
FOR MULES" HORSES AND
cows, see us, 20 head farm
mules. T. E. Cooper & Co., Inc.
(Foot Parsley St.)_
120 Office Equipment
GRADUATES -^LEt"US FRAME
your Diplomas. Reasonable prices
James Book Store. 113 Market.
Phone 824
120 Office Equipment
ENGRAVED WEDDING INVITA
tions and announcements. Rea
sonable priced. O. H. Shoemaker’s,
Phone 954.
125 Painting, Papering
Paint
Your House Now
On Sears
Easy Payment
Plan
Estimates Given
LITTLE JIM SHARPE. PAPER
hanger, moved from 16 St. to 714
Grace. Phone 1420-J.
135 Personal
SPECIAL MATTRESS RENQVAT
ing ivttes for next 30 days (Beach
Property Owners Only). Call for
particulars. New Way Mattress
Co.; Phone 428.
iJo Poultry
TURKEY POULrS MAMMOTH
Bronze from N. C. Hatchery. De
livery same day hatched. Phone
ICS, Keith Milling Co.
STA RTED CHICKS — EASIEST
raised: 2.80C 3-weeks old Barred
Rocks, 15c each. Roudabush’s
Seed Store.
139 Radio and Repairs
WE DOCTOR ALL RADIO TROU
bles. Radio Service Co., 208 Prin
cess St.. Phone 823. Sound Sys
terns for rent.
THOMPSON BICYCLE CO. 702
Castle St. Radios, bicycles, repairs,
lawn mowers electrically sharpen
efl. Phone 939, Quick delivery.
COME IN AND SEE THE SKY
Buddy! French Radio Co. Sales
and Service. Luke French, 1304
Market St.. Phone 852
SHACKLEFORD’S RADIO SERV
ice. Any make — any model. 3rd
and Grace. Phone 2709. (Com
mercial Frigidaire Dealer).
150 Real Estate
INVESTIGATE THE JOYS AND
advantages of living in Oleander,
“the Suburb Beautiful.” Hugh
MacRae and Co.
CHEAPEST LOT XEW FOREST
Hills, Colonial Drive; beautifully
wooded. Meares, Harriss, Real
Estate. Phone 1129.
WRIGHTS!’ 1LLE BEACH LOT
facing Channel; terms. H. F.
!Vilder. Phone 631
SALES-RENTALS-INVESTMENT
Moore-Fonvielle Realty Co.
We are equipped to serve you
LIST YOUR RENTAL AND SALES
with us. A-I Service.
Frank G. Harriss 120 Princess St.
FOR BEST RESULTS. LIST YOUR
property with Marshall Realty
Co., 216 Princess St. Phone 976.
155 Seeds and Plants
PLANT
WOOD'S ALYCE CLOVER NOW
FOR SUMMER GRAZING!
Also Field Peas, Soy Beans,
Crotalaria, Sudan Grass,
Arsenate of Lead, Rotenone
Dust, Calcium Ansenate etc.
T. W. WOOD & SONS
317 No. Front St. Phone 133
SPRAYING, PRUNING AND PER
tilizing shrubbury. Cut flowers.
John Verzaal, Phone 392-XR.
TOKIO SOYBEANS $1.50 BUSHEL.
Cowpeas $1.85. Rotenone Bean
Beetle Dust, fertilizers, feeds.
Roudabush’s Seed Store.
SOIL IMPROVEMENT AND HAY
Crop Seed. Crotalaria. Velvet
Beans, Coypeas, Soybeans, Sudan
Grass, Millet.
CROSS SEED CO.
12 Market St.Phone 1111
156 Situations Wanted
EXPERIENCED WAITER OR DO
mestic helper desires work. Col
lege student. References. Address
806 No. 6.
170 Wanted
WANTED SMALL H O U SE OR
lower apartment. Must have 2 bed
rooms. Telephone 1139-W.
WANTED LARGE CLEAN RAGS
to bring to Press Room. Star-News,
Murchison Bldg.
FOR QUICK RENTAL RESULTS.
List You; Vacancies in the Want
Ads. Phone 2800—Cos* Small.
WANTED 5 OR 6 ROOM UNFUR
nished bungalow. Convenient to
downtown. State price and loca
tion- “House” care Star-News;
180 Legal
lxixiikixxoticl
Having qualified as executrix of
the estate of Edward Clayton Moore.
Sr., deceased, late of New Hanover
County, North Carolina, this is to
notify all persons having claims
against the estate to exhibit them
to the undersigned at 314 Tide Water
Building. Wilmington, N. C„ on or
before May 3, 1941, or this notice
will be pleaded in bar of recovery.
All persons indebted to said estate
will please make immediate payment.
This the 3rd dav of May. 1940.
DELLA POWELL MOORE.
Executrix of the Estate of Ed
ward Clayton Moore. Sr.
E. Clayton Moore, Jr., Attorney.
INCREASE IN U. S.
INCOME REPORTED
Estimate On Wages During
First Third Of 1940 Given
By Government
WASHINGTON, May 30—<^P)—
American wages and other income
were $1,147,000,000 higher in the
first four months of 1940 than in
the same period of 1939, the com
merce department estimated to
day.
A department statement noted,
however, that the rate of increase
over last year had been declining
since the first of the year. In
January and February, for in
stance, income was about 6 per
cent higher than in the same 1939
months, while March and April
income was about 4 per cent high
er than the corresponding months
last year.
Wages and salaries made the
biggest gain compared with a year
ago, but, after allowance for sea
sonal factors, a slight decline was
indicated since the first of this
year.
For the first four months, total
income from all sources was $23,
478.000. 000, the department cal
culated
Of this figure, it reported, $14,
871.000. 000 was paid out in wages
and salaries, an increase of $699,
000,000; $2,944,000,000 was paid
out in dividends and interest, an
increase of $152,000,000; $4,703,000,
000 was paid out in rents, royal
ties and profits from unincorporat
ed businesses, an increase of $248,
000,000; and $960,000,000 was paid
| out in relief and similar payments,
a gain of $48,000,000 over a year
ago. 3
England Turns Plane
Engine Patents Over
To U. S. Government
WASHINGTON. May 3—(IP)—
England turned the patents on its
prize airplane engine over to the
United States today to facilitate
production of power plants both
for the American and Allied air
fleets.
The announcement was made by
Dr. George Jackson Mead, air
craft adviser to secretary of the
treasury Henry Morgenthau, Jr.
Mead said the British gave this,
government full rights to use in
any desired manner the patents to
its famed “Merlin”—A 12-cylinder,
liquid-cooled Rolls-R o y c e — the
same engine powering British
“Spitfires,” “Hurrican” and other
speedy pursuit ships.
Negro Is Injured When
Tornado Hits Vandemere
WASHINGTON, May 30. —UP)—
A tornado hit the town of Vande
mere near here about 1:30 p. m.
today, injured one person and de
molished about twenty small build
ings.
James Mizzelle, an Atlantic Coast
Line Railway section hand, had a
leg almost severed when a garage
biew down on him.
Reports here said the waterfront
was not damaged.
The damage was confined to one
section of town. Trees were uproot
ed and telephone poles twisted away.
Vandemere, a town of about 600
population, is in Pamlico county.
LINER NEARS IRELAND
NEW YORK, May 30.—UP)—The
American liner President Roosevelt,
sent by the state department to
Galway, Ireland, to remove Ameri
cans fleeing war areas, is expected
to arrive there tomorrow night, the
U. S. Lines said today. The liner
left New York May 24.
daily crossword
ACROSS*. 9. Bird’s beak 28. Pronoun
1. Often 10. Small child 29. Singing
(poet.) 12. Illusory bird
4. Perform image 34. Music note
7. French 16. Ready 35. Calm
cheese money 36. Bum
8. A blessing 17. A butterfly 37. Type of
10. Article of 18. Type molding
furniture measure 38. Floor cov
11. Short 20. A footway erings
13. Seed 21. Region 39. Affirmative
coating 22. Conflicts reply
14. Mediterran- 23. Sloth 41. Haul Yesterday’* Answer
ean island 24. Compact 42. Russian 45. Pronoun
15. Found out 26. Father river 46. Crushing snake
20. Stroke ZzZ ^_///_‘ UJ.
E:_Ii_
25. Therefore IO y/ il (2
26. Turkish coin //,
27. Destroys --77y?77?7u
30. Tightly draw 15 XX /// XX 14
31. Note of scale 7— — —--7“ -y. 7"-r-r-; -777 ——
32. Dried grass ~> 16 17 Id XX XX
33. Strain at -r-r- -rr~____ Z22 ___
34. Peltry 77/777^ 77. 20 21
36. Art of basket XX XX XX , ___ _ XX ______
making 22 23 24 yV 25 /V7 26
40. Jewish month __ _____ XX ___ __ XX _ _
43. Debauchee 27 2S 24
44. Soft fabric
46; £e masses 30 ^ ^ ^32
«:Scen ---
Neptune — -rT? CC2.----f.XZ ZXf XX
50. Roman money //' 7y, ~>~* 38 34
DOWN 4o" 4/ 42 %/ ^ ^ 43" **“
1. Eye socket _____ _____ ____ _____ ^ Xx /X
2. A snood uu 4c, XX 46 “““
3. Golf ball XX
4. Warp’jam ^ ^ ^
:5r war 1 HH 1 M
7. Naked Distributed bv 'Br!— - 3 31
Wall Street’s Students
Study Start Of Last War
Numerous Important Differ
ences Between Two Pe
riods Noted, However
BY FRANK MacMILLEN
NEW YORK, May —(A*)—The
manifold uncertainties of war have
set Wall street’s students of stock
market trends to studying records
of price movements in the early
days of the conflict of 1914-18 for
clues to the future.
There are numerous important
differences between the two peri
ods, as most analysts are quick
to point out. The chief of these,
most agree, is the fact that na
tionals of the warring powers are
no longer holders of the enormous
quantities of American securities
they possessed in the earlier
period.
Even those they did hold at the
outset of this war were largely
taken over by belligerent govern
ments, who have marketed them
cautiously, so as to avoid depre
ciating needlessly these valuable
assets.
But despite this and other diver
gencies, many in Wall street are
today studying the records of 1914
and 1915.
the outbreak of World War No. 1
brought a flood of selling, especial
ly by foreigners, which made it
necessary to suspend dealings in
stocks from the end of July ter
mid-December, and to keep certain
restrictions in effect until April 1,
1915.
Stock averages of that period do
not show any wide change in
prices when trading was resumed,
although some individual "war
babies, especially among steels,
coppers, rubbers, sugars, were
much higher.
In this conflict there have been
two distinct war shocks, the first
in September with outbreak o f
hostilities, the second in May with
the start of "total war.”
Neither of these events produced 1
convulsions which made it neces- ,
sary to stop trading or even seri- ]
ously impair the market mechan
ism. 1
The rise in the associated press 1
average of 60 stocks from Sep- i
tember 1 to the autumn peak on
October 25 was 11 per cent. The '
30 industrials in the compilation 1
rose 16 per cent. ;
Whem trading was resumed in t
December, 1914, stocks showed al- i
most no change on the average i
:or about 3 months. Then began :
l long climb which has scarcely ;
nterrupted until November 1916,
and which lifted general averages ;
about 35 per cent and industrial \
averages about 88 per cent. 1
Prices generally declined 1
.hrough 1917, and averages toward c
,he end of that year were a bit :
aelow levels of December. 1914. '
The year 1918 was the beginning
if a long inflationary period which i
inally ended in the collapse and £
Presbyterians To Pray
For Peace On June 2
The General Assembly of the
Presbyterian Church in the United
States, meeting in Chattanooga,
renn., recently, called upon the
3,500 churches in the denomina
tion to observe Sunday, June 2,
as a day of fasting and repentance
and prayer for peace throughout
sts bounds.
All Presbyterian churchs of Wil
mington will take pai’t in the ob
servance Sunday.
The public is invited to attend
:hese services. 3
Wolff Grocery Store
Robbed By Negro Man
The grocery store of Clyde Wofff,
at Sixth and Nixon streets, was
aeld up and robbed of an undeter
mined amount of cash late yester
lay afternoon.
Wolff told police that a negro
lame into the store and while his
jack was turned, grabbed a hand
mi of bills from the cash drawer,
de said that he held his gun on
he negro and he dropped two dol
ars. While coming from behind
;he counter, Wolff said, the negro
lashed out the door and escaped,
although he fired twice at him. 3
NAVAL STORES
SAVANNAH, May 30.—<A>)—Tur
pentine firm 27; offerings 52, all
sold, receipts 117; shipments 586;
stock 7,880. Rosin firm; offerings
i-3, all sold; receipts 761; shipments
1,433; stock 161.443.
Quote: B, 3.60; D, 3.65 E, 3.95;
5\ 4.35; G, 4.35; H. 4.35; I. 4.35;
X, 4.45; M, 4.85; N, 5.20; WG, 5.40:
VW. 5.80.
)ear market of 1921, when indices
;howed prices about 10 per cent
ower than in 1914.
Where markets stand now, in
his classic pattern of war-infla
ion-deflation, most analysts are
eluctant to guess.
They point out that our second
var-shock, the collapse of allied
orces in Belgium, and the pos
ibility of a short war, combined
o cause one of the sharpest bear
narkets in history, over a short
leriod. Nearly 25 per cent was
heared from average values in
bout 10 days, earlier this month.
Whether this action is compar
ble with periodic “peace scares”
duch briefly interruped the 1914
6 bull market, most analysts are
esitant to estimate. Like many
ther questions in Wall street, the
nswer probably depends on:
‘How long will the war last?”
Another complicating factor now
3 the beginning of America’s huge
rmament program. 3
AMERICA HONORS 1
PAST WARS’ DEAD
McNutt Warns U. S. Ideals
Threatened By ‘Totali
tarian Aggression’
By the Associated Press)
The shadow of Europe's holo
caust fell yesterday upon countless
quiet cemeteries in America,
where grateful citizens gathered
to honor the dead of past wars.
At Arlington national cemetery,
across the Potomac from Washing
ton, Paul V. McNutt warned a Me
morial Day throng that the ideals
and the work of the nation’s hero
dead were threatened with annihil
ation by “totalitarian aggression.”
"America must meet the threat
of total war with total prepared
ness.’’ the federal security admin
istrator said. “We will not equal
our potential enemies in military
strength: we will outdo them. We
will show the world what a vigil
ant, alert and free people can do
when danger is recognized.”
If defeat for the cause of “the
democracies” might be averted by
extending credit to them, McNutt
added, the future welfare and safe
ty of this country would justify
such a course.
In the event that the Ames rose
in Europe and Germany obtained
all or part of the English and
French fleets, he said, the United
Slates would be confronted with
“the immediate problem of occupy
ing island bases in the North At
lantic and Caribbean or tolerating
German claims and probable oc
cupation of these possessions as
the legitimate spoils of war.”
Speaking at Gettysburg. Pa , in
the national cemetery where Abra
ham Lincoln made his famed ad
dress, Governor Arthur H. James
of Pennsylvania declared:
“Peace can be attained, if at
all, first by preparing to defend
ourself; second, by tending to our
own business and tending to it
properly; and third, by setting as
our goal the vision of an America
of the future which can be a rock
of liberty in a sea of anarchy and
dissolution.”
The nation could end at once its
long struggle against depression,
the governor said, by spurring in
dustry for national defense.
In many other services there
were counterparts of these mas
sages.
President Roosevelt, himself
busy with the greatet peace-time
armament program in the history
of the United States, sent Major
Horace B. Smith, a military aide,
to Arlington to lay a wreath of
spring flowers on the tomb of the
Unknown soldier.
There was a Memorial Day pa
rade in the capital, and in it was
93-year-old Col. John M. Kline,
commander of the department of
the Potomac, Grand Army of the
Republic.
Gen. Julius F. Howell, 94, of
Bristol, Va., national commander
of the United Confederate Veter
ans, and Frederick James Mc
Wade, 93, of Holmesburg, Pa., a
veteran of the Union forces, ap
peared on the same platform at ,
Gettsburg to hear Governor James.
In Carbondale, 111., Mrs. Juha
Amon recalled that two civil war ;
veterans conducted a memorial
service at the graves of their com
rades 74 years ago, and that this
led Gen. John A Logan to issue
later an order proclaiming May 30
as the annual day of observ- ^
ance. 1
I
California Man Offers
To Sell Secret Weapon [
To England And France
OGDEN. Utah, May 30—W—'Ma
jor Harold W. Webbe of Palo Alto,
Calif traveled toward Washing
ton today to negotiate with repre- ,
sentatives of England and France
for sale of a weapon of his own in- i
vention “so devastating in effect
the Allies may refuse to use it.”
“I do not intend to make public
just what this new weapon is be
cause I do not want the Nazis to
get hold of it,” the retired army
officer told interviewers during a
train stop here.
“But I will say,” he continued,
“that it can be fired from England
to Germany, from North Africa in
to Italy and from battleships. It
will wipe out an entire city at a
time.”
“It is very practical, simple and
effective. It may be the same as
the Germans’ secret weapon.” 1
WHY THEY WEAR RED COATS
When the sport of fox hunting was
in its infancy, it was found that a
hunter who had fallen from his
mount could be more easily located
if he wore a red coat, so most fox
hunters now wear red or pink coats.
_
CLASSIFIED DISPLAY j
Wesibrook-Srown
MOTOR COMPANY
USED CARS
Corner 2nd & Dock S(s.
SUPERMAN Floating Power By Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster: \
fwi LL YA take! TAKE NO *§gS
A LOOK? HE J CHANCES!
— HE FELL \ FULL SPEED *
Iqutath' SKYjJ^ AHEADH
I STOPPING THE CAR IN ITS
TRACKS, SUPERMAN HOISTS
IT OVERHEAD...

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