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The Wilmington morning star. [volume] (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, May 31, 1940, Image 3

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RILLION MORE lb
askedJ2?-?efense
(Continued From Page One)
special message, the .
^^it'lunounced.
111 Rock Funds A oted
. event bearing on defense
A maJruired late today on Capi
.Vthe house voted, 187 '
101 H1 , make funds available for
10 lU' l. third set of locks for the
tuildi c a ‘ial at an ultimate cost
Faitama _ ^ j277.ooo.OOO. The pro- ,
eslicnaldvc.cates have emphasized it
V®1 * cessitry defense measure,
st a_ hat if existing locks were ,
sayinP n)V.|i communications
destru.1 ft • and Atlantic oceans
JST* ^ "T f
1,reposal- in the form of an
imrnt to a pending war de
«mf”'unt -civil functions” appro
1., rim'' was approved some time
prial'°”'tiie senate. Today’s action
a?0 yrtversal of a previous stand, .
^-int-i, the house refused to vote
the funds. I
the ;,! <n. $15,000,000 would
Ln.-;e available immediately, and
hc mtim would be empowered to '
,l!r into contracts calling- $99,
entei “1LU
000.000. ;
..-Hie the President held his first
i with the defense commis- (
mef spmini- Bvrnes (D-SC), acting ,
01., Mr. Roosevelt s approval.pro
j a vast program of training
W000 civilian conservation corps ;
,rolleCs in motor vehicle mainten- (
j fj,.st aid. road building, cook
“nj ' photography and other non
combatant activities vital to the
arme(i services in war-time. The ’
-rpposal took the form of an 1
amendment to the pending relief 1
bill.
I \eiv Agency Planned 1
! vnother development was a sen- ;
a,j banking committee vote ap
proving a bill permitting the Re- 1
construction Finance corporation to
s« up a new agency empowered to i
tnild plants or acquire machinery :
the production of defense sup- ,
mes. senator Taft (R-Ohio) op
posed the measure as granting p0w
M's that were too sweeping.
For nearly an hour and a half. Mr.
Roosevelt was closeted with the de
ense commission—a group of seven,
irawn from industry, labor and gov
ernment, to oversee the big expan
sion of industry and production
vhich the defense program neces
sitates and stand guard against labor
iifficulties and inflated prices.
Then, he called correspondents to
lis office and told them what had
leen done, and cleared up, in part
it least, an aspect of the commis
iions work upon which there had
leen much speculation ever since the
innouncement of its creation on
I’uesday.
He replied with a sharp nod of his
lead to a question whether the eom
nission would have "all the author
ty of its war time predecessors,”
vitli another nod to a question
vhether it would report to him di
•ectly, and a shake of his head to a
bird, whether the commission would
lave to clear its activities through a
(roup of cabinet members.
Technically, the commission is sub
irdinate to a cabinet council, by the
erms of the war-time law under
vhich it was established. Some had
luggested that the rearmament pro
tram might be impeded if cabinet
nembers were placed over the indus
rialists and others on the commis
!ion, although the President told re
lorters Tuesday that they may as
veil forget the cabinet angle of the
■ommissinn
Seven Parts
Today's meeting, Mr. Roosevelt
laid, divided the work ot ttie com
nission into its seven parts, and he
ielded that the members were rearing'
,o go. He expected, he said, to get
nto full production in about six
nunths. or half the time it took to
each that stage in the World war
irmament program.
The first task of William S. Knud
ien, in charge of the fabrication of
aw materials into the finished pro
luct, will be to get on to paper the
• pecifications and requirements of
he armed forces for the items which
vill be purchased. This, he added,
nvolves a decision on the part o£ the
irmy and navy as to whether, for in.
itance, one or two types of training
ilanes and engines shall be used in
head of the much larger number
row in service.
Knudsen's next responsibility, lie
continued, will be scheduling pro
inction. so that various items will be
■oming along as needed for assembly,
fhis means, he added, a system of
working out priorities of manufac
:ure, as was done in the AVorld war.
Knudsen's third and last responsibil
ity will be the delivery of the finish
ad products, he said.
Ralph Budd. in charge of trans
portation, Mr. Roosevelt said, will
nave the problem of making prepara
tions for taking care of a much
larger tonnage of freight than now
r Ai i n ■> i r 7—r- 1
"FRANCE 1
FRENCH GUARD
ALLIES’ ESCAPE
(Continued From Page One)
wall of the Allied armies of the
north.
This wall, extending from Cassel
to Gravelines, formed one side of
a 40-mile-long corridor of escape
running northwest from the re
gion of Lille to Dunkerque—a be
sieged city manned by French sail
ors and marines—through which
the British and French streamed
toward the coast.
The other side was formed by
an Allied line running from Nieu
port to Ypres along the Yser river,
and here the French war ministrv
spokesman declared that the Nazi I
rush was being held.
While the broken Allied bat- j
talions which already had reached
Dunkerque were being moved across
the English channel under cover I
of the guns of the British and
French fleets, others were pouring
down the corridor, forcing a bloody
passage at points where the Nazi
advance guards sought to bar them.
Smash Nazi Line
The Germans were successful dur
ing the day in throwing a light
line across the corridor from Cas- j
sel 1:? miles northeast to Poper- i
inghe, but French rear guard tanks j
at once smashed into it.
Air battles raged along with the I
vast ground movements and a !
French source declared about 7.1
German planes had been shot
down.
The German advance on the
southern wing had its first big
success of the day in the capture
of Mount Cassel—two miles from
the town itself—and was carrying
on tonight.
Declared by a French spokes
man to be outnumbered nearly
three to one, the Allies left the
tragic fields of Flanders punished'
as they never had been. Many
areas lay under water, flooded by
lay the conquering- German march
to the sea. They were alight with
the fires of burning buildings and
torn bv the incessant explosion
of thousands of guns.
Despite the loss of Flanders—
which gave the Germans control
of 10,000 square miles of rich ter
ritory, virtually all of France’s
coal mining region and about half
her industrial area—the French
authorities took it with chins up.
Homes and buildings lay in black
ruins.
“Now, more than ever, American
industrial aid is absolutely neces
sary,” said a spokesman for the
ministry of information.
But in the face of defeat and
devastation, the French spoke with
pride of the “‘glory” of the Allied
struggle from the beginning of the
battle to its present end and de
clared, in contrast to Berlin re
ports, that there had not been “a
single surrender.’’
To illustrate the grave peril of
the surviving Allied companies, a
French authority said that they
numbered about 170.000 men, in 18
divisions of which ten were
French and eight were British,
against 700.000 Nazis—40 infantry
divisions and eight armored col
umns.
OBITUARIES
WILLARD A. PERKINS
Funeral rites for Willard Arthur
Perkins, who died at Janies Walker
Memorial hospital Wednesday morn
ing after a lingering illness, were
held from the graveside in the Gar
ris cemetery at Watha yesterday
afternoon at 4 o’clock.
The Rev. Austin Wheeler conduct
ed the services.
He is survived by his wife, Mrs.
Effie Perkins; one son, Willie Per
kins; and two daughters, Miss
Mable Lee Perkins, of Watha, and
Mrs. O. C. Huggins, of the Castle
Hayne Road.
A. A. HILBURN
BLADENBORO, May 30.—Funer
al services for A. A. Hilburn, 73.
prominent citizen and farmer, post
master and merchant here, who died
at his home Wednesday afternoon
at 1 o’clock following a long illness,
were held from the iate residence
this afternoon at 4 o'clock.
Burial followed in viT'e Bladenboro
cemetery.
The Rev. R. J. Hall, pastor of the
First Baptist church, of which Mr.
Hilburn was a charter member, con
ducted the services. Pallbearers were
nephews of the deceased.
He is survived by his wife and the
following children: W. S. Hilburn, of
Longview, Wash., A. A. Hilburn, Jr.,
of Whiteville, Carr Hilburn, of
Bladenboro, Mrs. C. O. Letcher, of
Marion, S. C., Mrs. R. C. Boyd and
Mrs. Leonard Fox, of Hamlet, and
Mrs. George Clark, of St. Augustine,
Fla.
ALBERT SIMMONS
WHITEVILLE, May 30.—Albert
Simmons, six-month-old son of Mrs.
Clemmie Simmons and the late Mr.
Simmons of Whiteviile, route four,
died in the hospital here at 9:45
a. m. yesterday of a complication (
of diseases. Funeral rites were con
ducted today.
MRS. W. C. WARD I
WHITEVILLE, My 30.—Funeral
services for Mrs. W. C. Ward, 39. j
being handled by the various types i
if carriers. His work will extend to
ships, barge lines and trucks, as well J
is the railroads.___ ,
SAVeTTaVE! SAVE! !
rlenew your fire or auto insur
ince in a strong non-assessable s
nutual company. Current savings J
!5 per cent. f
F. E. LIVINGSTON & CO. '
MUTUAL INSURANCE «
MEETING PLANNED
(Continued From Page One)
a common goal, for the common
good of humanity would seem, he
believes, the safest, soundest prin
ciple upon which to found a new
national aspiration.
Bishop Darst appointed an ex
ecutive committee, with himself an
exofficio member, to complete the
round table organization plans.
The members he named are Har
ry Solomon and Rabbi Thurmar
for the Jews. Father Cornelius
Murphy and J. J. Allen for the
Catholics, and Rev. J F. Herberl
and O. F. Cooper for the Protest
ants. These are to choose a sec
rotary, with instructions to nam<
Rev. James T. Lawson if Mr. Law
son’s engagements will permit him
to serve. A programming meeting
of this committee will be h e 1 c
next Monday at the office of Mr
Dosher.
In attendance at the luncheon
which was held at the Crystal cafe
were: J. J. Allen, Harry Solomon
Wilbur R. Dosher. Robert Strange
O. F. Cooper. Phil Buchheit, th(
Eev. Mortimer Glover, Bishoi
Thomas C. Darst, Rabbi Thurman
Rev C. D. Barclift, Dr. Edwii
F. Keever, the Rev. James T. Law
eon and John FT TTonp.
MAXWELL THROWS
AID TO BROUGHTON
(Continued From Page One)
day showed these totals: Brough
ton. 147,431: Horton 103,794; Max
well, 100,945. otals for the othei
four democratic gubernatorial can
didates had not been brought u{
he complete vote for all state
and congressional posts may no(
be known until Monday, when the
state board of elections will meel
here to certify returns.
Any doubt that there would be a
second primary in the eighth con
gressional district was dispelled to
day when the state board received
a telegram from the runner-up,
C. B. Deane of Rockingham, call
ing for the run-off. Leading the
field in the eighth district was W.
O. Burgin of Lexington, the incum
bent.
Burgin and Deane also were can
didates in a run-off primary in the
district in 1938, which resulted in
a heated controversy over illegal
voting. A board of arbitration fi
nally declared Burgin the winner.
Horton will have five days after
returns are certified to file his for
mal request for the gubernatorial
run-off. If the board files certifica
tion Monday, as expected, Horton
will have until 6 p.m. June 8 to
make the request.
Maxwell’s telegram to his coun
ty managers follows:
“My statement in Monday’s pa
pers opposing any second primary
in the governor's race represents
my very definite opinion and I
icpe that no second primary will
oe held. I have also publicly stated
that in the event of a second pri
ADVERTISEMENT
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That's a quick and effective way
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Remember the kidneys often need
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mary I will personally support Mr.
J. M. Broughton, the leading can
didate, and I earnestly hope that
my managers and supporters will
follow the same course. I again
express appreciation lor your fine
support of roe.”
Horton did not comment on Max
well’s telegram, but reiterated the
belief that Burgin Pennell of Ashe
ville, who managed Maxwell’s
campaign, would join the Horton
forces as co-manager.
Ronald Wilson of Raleigh and
Mrs. W. B. Murphy of Snow Hill,
Maxwell’s associate managers and
women's manager, respectively,
have indicated that they will fol
low Pennell.
Horton added that many county
managers for Maxwell had pledged
him their support, and that many
managers for L. Le Gravely of
Rocky Mount, who ran fourth in
the gubernatorial primary, also
had come into his camp.
Gravely has announced his sup
port for Broughton. Broughton’s
headquarters said that approxi
mately one-third of the Maxw'ell
and Gravely county managers had
pledged their support to Brough
ton. 1
Leigh, Olivier Called
Home For War Service
N'KW YORK, May 30.—OP)—Vivi
on Leigh and Laurence Olivier, Eng
lish actors new playing on Broao
way in Romeo and Juliet, were sum
moned home by the Plritish govern
ment. today to enter war service.
The screen and stage stars said
they recently volunteered, in let
ters to the British ministry of in
formation, to serve in any available
capacities.
They announced they would close
their Broadway run on June S and
take the first homeward bound ship.
They said they were not advised
what their duties would be.
Healthy snakes cast their skins
approximately once in every two
months.
CRAVER TO HEAD
POSTAL WORKERS
Winston-Salem Man Selected
President At Meeting In
Greensboro
GREENSBORO, May 30. —t.P)—
Prank Graver, of Winston-Salem,
was elected president of the North
Carolina branch of the United Na
tional association of Postoffice
Clerks at its annual convention, held
here today.
Mrs. R. L. Thompson, of High
Point, was named head of the la
dies’ auxiliary.
Robert Moseiev, of Greensboro
delivered the feature address of the
convention, outlining' seven oasi
rights of mankind. Floyd Sanders
of Atlanta, national vice president
also spoke R. L. Cole, of Atlanta
Georgia state president, invited the
Tar Heels to attend his state’s con
vention at Rome' July 4.
J. E. Joyce, of Madison, was elect
ed first vice president, and Joe Rag
land, of Kernersville, second vic<
president; T. F. Day, Winston-Sal
em, third vice president, Marvir
Eliis, Mt. Airy, lourth vice preci
dent, and H. I,. Parkins, Reidsville
fifth vice president. J. C. Easter
of High Point, became secretary ant
M, C. Foust, of Greensboro, was
re-elected treasurer.
Every second. 15 tons of water
f ’ Ion the earth's surface in the
c._ ....,
PITY THE POOR GORILLA
The sensational gorilla stories of
Paul du Chaillu, first white man to
shoot a gorilla, did much to create
an erroneous impression of this ani
mal. Edgar Allan Poe's “Murders in
.
the Rue Morgue” increased the pub
lic distrust of these apes. The works
of other fiction writers further serv
ed to give them such a terrifying rep
utation that they almost caused ex
tinction of the animal.
vho died at her home in Whiteville,
rt. F. D., Tuesday at noon, were!
leld Wednesday afternoon at Shiloh
dethodist church near Hallsboro at
!: 30 o’clock by the Rev. C. A. Jones,
>f Hallsboro.
Burial followed in the church
lemetery. Mrs. Ward was a mem
ber of the Methodist church. Sur
viving are her parents, Mr. and
VIrs. H. P. Smith, her husband,
md three brothers, Glad, Cam and
Walter Smith, all of Whiteville.
HAYNES L. CAMPBELL
WHITEVILLE. May 30.—Haynes
Lennon Campbell, 65. died at his
home near Clarkton Tuesday morn
ing following an illness extending
lA'er a, period of sometime.
He is survived by his wife, the
former Miss Addie Lou Maultsby,
Df Hallsboro; four sons, John W.
Campbell, of South Whiteville; Ir
vin R.. Linwood and Felton Camp
bell. all of Clarkton; four daugh
ters. Mrs. Wayland Dores. of White
ville. Mrs. .7. K. Nichols, of Coal
wood. W. Va., Mrs. M. L. Carlyle.
3f Whiteville. and Miss Catherine
Campbell, of Clarkton.
Funeral rites were held Tuesday
afternoon at 3:30 from the home by
the Rev. I. T. Newton, Baptist min
ister. Burial followed in the fami
ly cemetery.
BETY THMOPKINS
WHITEVILLE, May 30. — Betty
Thompkins, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. W. P. Thompkins. of Tabor
City, died in the Columbus county
hospital here yesterday afternoon
at 3:35 o’clock after a short illness.
The child was 7 days old.
Funeral rites were held today.
M A MI rv MrnAADI A I
r H. L. CLARDY
KH North Eighth Street
1^PALMOIIVE20c
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ENJOY safe summer driving
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_ BUDGET DEPT._
Receivers Sale
By virtue and in pursuance of a decree of the Hon. J. Paul j
Frizzelle, Judge holding the Court of the Eighth Judicial District, j
in the suit of John W. Fredericks and Finley McMillan against
W. C. Manson for the dissolution of the partnership known as
the Manson Towing & Lighterage Company, the undersigned will
offer for sale, at public auction, to the highest bidder, for cash,
at 12:00 o’clock M., on Saturday, the 1st day of June. 1940, at
the wharf of the Manson Towing & Lighterage Company at the
foot of Chestnut Street in the City of Wilmington. N. C., the
steam tugs or boats ‘‘Battler” and ‘‘Cambria,” one derrick barge,
one preaching barge, one barge A. C. L. No. 8. together with all
their apparel, equipment, furniture and fixtures; subject to a
first mortgage on the "Cambria” of about $2400.00 held by the
Atlantic Towing Company, of Savannah, Ga., a scond mortgage
of about $2600.00 on both the "Battler” and the “Cambria,” and a
mortgage of $1400.00 on the tug “Battler."
The said sale is to be reported to the Court for confirmation
or rejection.
A. S. BATSON.
Receiver of the Manson Towing & Lighterage Company
412 Southern Building.
Wilmington, N. C.
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