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The Wilmington morning star. (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, June 19, 1940, Image 8

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1940-06-19/ed-1/seq-8/

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CHAPTER FORTY-FOUR
McGuire motioned to me across
the courtroom. Reluctantly I went
through the swinging door in the
railing and mounted the witness
stand. I couldn’t very well refuse.
I repeated the story I had told
him earlier. “Yes, I looked out
the upstairs bathroom window,” I
said. “I saw Mr. Montcalm come
out of the clubhouse and stumble
over the body. He did not strike
Markham. He acted frightened.”
“Witnesses have testified that
someone threw a stool into the
river,” Harvey McGuire reminded
me. “Did you see anyone else in
the garden?”
"I saw no one in the garden but
Jerry and—the body.”
“You didn’t see William Calla?”
i\o.
“How do you account for that?”
"There may have been willow
trees in the way, or possibly he
was around the corner of the build
ing from me.”
“Do you have any reason to
doubt his story?”
“None at all. He described Mr.
Montcalm’s actions exactly as I
saw them.”
The district attorney wasn’t sat
isfied. He asked a few queston of
his own. “This stool that supposed
ly was thrown into the river—did
you see it earlier in the evening?
Where had it been standing?”
“In the rose arbor.”
“Could a man have thrown it
from there into the river? Was the
river close enough?”
“A very strong man might be
able to make such a throw.”
“The rose arbor was in plain
view from the bathroom window?”
“It was.”
“Can you swear there was no
one in the rose arbor?”
I hesitated. “No, I can’t swear
it. I saw no one there.”
I was waved down from the
stand by a very puzzled district
attorney. He asked Jerry if he
was willing to testify. Jerry nodd
ed, swallowed hard, and took the
_J
The judge warned him that any
thing he said might be held against
him. flHe did not need to answer
questions.
"I have nothing to hide,” Jerry
told him.
“Did you throw anything into
the river?” the district attorney
asked.
“Mr. Strickland says that as far
as he could see there was no one
else in the garden. Mr. Strickland
was upstairs. You have testified
that you saw him go up stairs. Was
he carrying a stool at that time?”
Jerry look surprised. “No. He
was not.”
“Are you sure?”
“Sure I’m sure. He had nothing
in his hands.”
the district attorney looked help
lessly at the judge. “They say
somebody threw something in the
river.” He shrugged his shoulders.
“It’s beyond me. No more ques
tions.”
George Markham spoke up. “If
it please the court, I have some
thing more to say.”
The judge raised his eyebrows.
“You wish to testify?”
"I would like the coroner to an
swer one question. Was my brother
stabbed by a man who was right
landed or left-handed?”
The coroner, who was one of
the spectators and had taken no
part in the hearing, seemed flus
tered for a moment, but on re
quest from Harvey McGuire he
went forward to the witness stand,
was sworn in and given the ques
ion.
“There is no way to determine
positively that George Markham
was stabbed by a left-handed as
sailant,” he said, ‘but the position
of the wound indicated that it
could have been inflicted more
easily by a left-handed man.” He
gave a technical description of the
course followed by the blade that
struck Alfred’s heart. “Any evi
dence of this nature is mullified
in part at deast, by the peculiar
chape of the instrument we believe
was used. We believe it was a
garden trowel with a T-shaped
handle. Such a trawel might have
been held in closed fist, the blade
projecting out between the fingers,
or it might have been gripped as a
knife would be gripped. The angle
of the blade would vary accord
ingly.”
“But is it your expert opinion,”
the judge asked, “that the wound
more likely was made by an instru
ment in the hands of a left-handed
person?”
“It seems more likely. I cannot
testify that that was the case.”
The judge nodded. “I see no
need for further testimony.” He
addressed the courtroom. “I can
find nonthing against Mr. Mont
calm but the circumstantial evi
dence tends to show that there
was someone else in the garden—
someone well hidden. In regard
to this last testimony, I am well
enough acquainted with the accused
to know that he is right-handed—
and awkward with his left hand.
Case is dismissed. Discharge the
prisoner.”
George Markham was one of the
first to rush forward and congrat
ulate Jerry. “I take all the blame,”
he said. “I acted on impluse. I am
dreadfully sorry.”
A girl flung herself between them
and threw her arms around Jerry's
neck. “Oh, Jerry, Jerry.” Her face
was buried on his coat. She was
sobbing.
He put his arms comfortingly
around her. “It’s all over, Muriel.
All over” I don’t think he ever
saw George.
I elbowed out through the crowd.
My feeling was one of vast relief.
The testimony I had feared would
come out, had not even been hint
ed. Behind me was the flash of
photographic bulbs, but the Mark
ham family would not be in the
headlines. The story now was
Jerry — all Jerry.
There was no sense in my con
gratulating him now. I would speak
to him later, when the public left
him in peace. Or should I say,
when the public left Jerry and
Muriel in peace?
I saw reporters rushing to the
telephone booths outside the court
room. Each was in a hurry to get
his story to his editor first. Belzer
was among them, but instead of
hurrying to a booth he was talking
with a man I recognized as a plain
clothes officer.
When Belzer and the officer part
ed I approached my former con
federate. “Too bad The Morning
Eagle doesn’t put out a midday
edition,” I told him. “For once I'm
afraid you’re scooped.
“That’s what you think.”
“But — you didn’t even tele
hone.”
“Why should I telephone an ex
clusive story?”
“Do you know something that
didn’t come out in this testimony?”
“You’ll be surprised” He gave
me a look I didn’t like, and walked
away.
Puzzled, I turned to a telephone
booth myself. I wanted to report
the good news to Louise Mark
ham.
In the booth next to mine was
the plain clothes officer. He had
neglected to shut the door tightly
and I heard him say: “Listen,
Chief, here’s a hot tip from Belzer
of The Mornig Eagle. He says to
send someone right out to search
William Strickland’s room on
Laurel street. You know the ad
dress. Yeah. He says Strickland’s
been holding out some evidence on
us. Hurry. This guy Strickland may
be on his way home now.” 2
(To Be Continued)
SINKING CONFIRMED
PORT ARTHUR, Tex., June 18—
LfP)—Texaco marine officials con
firmed today without details the sink
ing of the tanker, Italia, which sail
ed from Port Arthur for European
ports. May 21. It was owned by the
Texas company of Norway. Earlier
reports from other sources said the
vessel was torpedoed or bombed
June 14 off the coast of England and
sank with the loss of 19 men.
LABOR PLEDGE
LONDON, June 18—(A*)—The na
tional council of labor issued a state
nent tonight pledging British work
trs to "give their utmost in every
Held of production and energy for
vhich this crisis calls." The council
■epresenting the entire British ia
10r movement, declared “we are de
tending our liberty, fighting for our
principles. The price of victory is
the courage to endure.”
THIS CURIOUS WORLD '

”"7 y' ^ y° f«a
tamsoca,
NETHERLANDS EAST IMDIES, THREW °
OUT ABOUT 3<9 O04S/C „
OF SOLID MATERIAL. IN AN 1815 c»
ERUPTION _ ^ _
, rfk. QUOTATI ON, |
THE PATHS OP 6LORV J
lead but to the l
spave;' is from
_ s^>Ay is- a/aav
□ S>L7(4Aa£57=i£>4A&£.
ANSWER: Thomas Gray’s “Elegy ’
ST. LOCKS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BASEBALL TEAM
HAS NEVER WON A
PENNANT.
Written in a Country Churchyard."
BEilxA. ii AIN AIN LUUKI KEEORTER g”"j—T7j~ --
Founded on Actual Court Reco rds and You Can Be the Judge " em€
The
Strange
Case of
POLLY
AND THE
PAWN
SHOP

I IN SIX
EPISODES
No. 3
->
■ ' wB&Xd
AFTER THE DAB1NG HOLD-UP OF A f~
PAWN-SHOP IN DOWN-TOWN
Sl'i'tP0' °°R SCENE CHANGES TO
I^L£?ME °* M|SS POuy WCLURE
WHERE*.. '
ms
i
1
M HALSTEAD AND CHERRY /
P UNCLE CHARLIE’S PLACE/
|!q GOOD HEAVENS!
IS fAY RING/
Ihr
OUT OUR WAY By J. R. Williams
f Mf OH, NO” YOU \ /WELL.UH" ' HE'S AFRAID V I WOULD
U / WON’T NEED \ WHY, AH-* TO TAI4E IT 1 MYSELF
§yg§Pf,S TO GIVE ME \ WELL, I MOW BECAUSE 1 GUYS LIKE
WTwjp AMY SECURITY | JUST DON’T IT'S GIVEN HIM DON'T
OR INTEREST” I NEED IT \ TOO FREELY/ / HAVE WEAR
IT'S ONLY TWO ( RIGHT NOW- HE WANTS / MOMENTS—
DOLLARS AND JUST KEEP / TIME TO \ HE'S HONEST
Z/WWi>m mot worried it an’ i’ll / thinic whats 1 and i trust
ABOUT YOU/ / SEE YOU 7 BACIC OF SUCH J HIM, BUT I
-t^-r-r—T=c: ‘ LATER /V GENEROSITY/7 JUST DON'T
TOO EASY /a
V . COWL 1X01Y NCA SERVICE. INC. T. M. REG. U. «■ PAT. Off. (0 IS J
---- mn
OUR BOARDING HOUSE . . with . . . Major H ,
E NEVER
SUSPECTED FORA
MINUTE IT WASN'T]
\J^N ACCIDENT -
57--- _____ ***'
f OOPS/?'
^GOSU.IT DON'T happen!
iPZZrVf °NCE in Pivp -
YEARS THftT I t:
drop a brush l
DOGGOned i 1
%•someone Ain't '
rm\eT^DiN1'BELow'i
m w\l lTB<=pOOKV fj
1 f S_)THATS WHAT ITS/
\%X4Hc~1LL leave it l'
ms&rn nJP ^^Ain J~~ |
!
i
LITTLE ORPHAN ANNIE AwaFFromTtA}
Y WHY NOT TAKE A
I VACATION? ITS BEEN
I A TOUGH YEAR
I EVERYTHING IS UNDER
I CONTROL NOW - I
I CAN GETAWAY ALL
BRIGHT FOR A M ONTH
p!>" j
IP I
YES- SOMEWHERE
A LONG WAY FROM
| GANGSTERS AND SPIES
AND CRIME-AND
| FROM POLITICS
AND WAR
T I
| HM-M-M—WELL.^^®®*
I THERE MUST BE T AND WE ^
I SOME PEACEFUL I WON'T EVEN
I PLACE- WE'LL I TURN ON THE
I SAIL DOWN AMONG I RADIO, JOHN
I THE ISLANDS- Zf WONT IT BE
' a,wonderful:
| p/,»^!'^FOR AWHILE?
I WE'LL TAKE PLENTY OF
I BOOKS.I'VE ALWAYS MEANT
I TO READ-FISHING TACKLE
I TOO, OF COURSE- PLENTY'
I OF PROVISIONS - I'LL
I START GETTING THE
Sboat IN SHAPE tomorrow
-
I IP /
V
WASH TUBBS A Bad Man To Cross ~~ By Roy Cram
OH, HO. SO VOO WAS FIXlW TO MEDDLE \
IU MV AFFAIRS A6AIU, WAS VOU? »U WAS
s-^AIMIM' TO DO ME DIRT, HEy? J
AN' y&u7 AE LOVELY LASS! VOU'VE T|
THROWED IN Wl' THE VORON6 SIDE. YE'LL
6IT YOUR JUST DESERTS THE SAME AS /
HIKA, AW DON'T FOR6IT IT
la&ulunu alley The Budget
»t_ Off..
MO^^TheOncSffoTribune.
i
THE GUMPS _ _ The Sound And The Fur] I
j ipwiiiniimnnH
' WEShanV disturb \ r-V
YOUR MDUNCrMAN-’TlS \ / OOH, V
WISER TO LET HIM REST- Vt , HOW l
AND NOW, DEAR CHI LD, I \ \ WONNERFUL!f
\ HAVE CjREAT NEWS FOR V\ BUT— /
1 l YOU -THROUGH THE KINDNESS ]
i Of HER HEART MRS. FLEECER/ \
V HAS decided to sponsor. 7 ’
h; i i i mm
W NOW, NOW, MY V BUT, MRS. FLEESAtR
%\ DEAR-DON'T BOTHER\ YOU Do NOT
gj TO THANK ME-MY / ONNERSTANCrMr
X UFE HAS ALWAYS / PREENCE CHARMEENO
; \ Been devoted to i mat- not want to _
" \the happiness A Marry weeth me- ft
SpM^Fakyes-but J
W THAT REFUSAu V.f / I'M SORR^T
W uiuat?J! redoundstothe If/ BUT You'll U
■ *vrw . JT YbUTH'S CREDIT-HE I T HAVE TO EE
FEL-T HE WAS TOO Vi ©UlET-YOO ^
POOR TO MARRY L V DISTURB^6
\ YOU-BUT ALLAY \ \MY PATlEHTy,
your fears, dear, )
Ifgppy ' \l WILL IRON OUT THAT
pjT^ghf, ,P4Q^The Chicago Trib-.::iJ» ' _ H
BRICK BRADFORD—Seeks theTTisinond Doll By William Ritt and ClarenceGrayI
COME, WE MUST CATCH THE WHITE I
MAN AND TELL HIM WE MEAN p
'-—i NO HARM f—'
5 '■
W's m
- g0>Y,ICWT ■'««■ «'NC W*f.. --
T»- W. WQKto *K>m MMKVTO $-*-19

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