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The Wilmington morning star. [volume] (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, July 13, 1940, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1940-07-13/ed-1/seq-8/

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Oren^rnold
WRITTEN FOR ANBJiELEASED BY CENTRAL PRESS ASSOCIATION \£
' . SYNOPSIS
THE CHARACTERS:
BENJAMIN MERIfiELD, aged
capitalist, hires
GAYE DIXON to make love to
his grandson,
JEREMY TUCKER, a shy student
of archeology, while
BILL BAILEY and six pretty girls
are employed to help bring life
and youth to the Merrifield man
sion.
* * *
YESTERDAY: Bill Bailey takes on
the task of trying to learn who
committed the jewel robbery at
the Merrifield party.
CHAPTER SEVENTEEN
Gayle slept but little that night.
She barely remembered seeing the
party break up, although she hoped
she had shown presence of mind
enough to say gracious good nights.
Most of the last courtesy was di
rected at Jeremy Tucker, anyway,
since he was the honored one.
She was awake at dawn and she ■
dressed at once and went down
,,+,,,-..,, gj,,+ rrot Vior hnnpH
for chance to think alone.
‘Good morning!’ Mr. Merrifield
spoke heartily, surprising her from
behind a stone column on the
porch. ‘Up so soon after the par
ty!’ ’
“Oh! Good morning!’ ’
‘You’ll have breakfast with me?
In just a minute or two now.”
She had to agree. And it was
pleasant, really, eating with him
and enjoying his kindly courtesy.
He pulled out her chair for her,
and said grace for the two of them,
and served her from the big bowl
of 'cereal that was placed before
them, and poured cream for her,
and otherwise was courtly. She
couldn’t help loving the old man.
She wished he were her own
grandfather. She had never had
one, could barely remember her
own father, in fact.
_ i _j _ 1_
±Iit: SUvJlclUliiLj ncic “v*
the more determined to keep the
new worry away from his ears. As
soon as she could she went quietly
to the maid, the cutler, and to Bill
Bailey and pledged them anew to
secrecy in the matter of the theft
of last evening.
‘After all, it was only a thou
sand dollar loss, and there was in
surance,’ she said. ‘The Tways
are well to do. Don’t upset Mr.
Merrifield, or dear old Mr.
Weems.”
‘Right,” said Bill. ‘But I’ve been
thinking. I’ve got some ideas.”
•What, Bill?”
“I think I know something. May
fa- not, but I’m going to play my
hunch, on my own.’ ’
‘Tell me!’ ’
‘Wnt rmw WaiPll T’m sure.’ *
“Bill Bailey, I hate you! Last
night you said you were in love
and then you shut up about it. Now
this!”
He smiled back at her, tousled
her hair quickly and ducked to
avoid a blow she aimed at him.
They hadn’t much time for teas
ing and cutting up, however, be
cause preparations for the play,
‘Maid to Measure,” had to be com
pleted fast. First it was necessary
to prepare the theater itself. Fold
ing chairs were rented, and this
Wednesday morning Bill supervis
ed placing them in the two big
ballrooms even while rehearsal was
under way. A few properties had
to be borrowed, and he himself had
to paint some scenery for Act 2. It
was an outdoor scene, and by using
shrub cuttings nailed to portable
floor boards they could do wonders;
but a backdrop of blue sky was
necsessary to make the artificial
sunlight realistic. Bill stretched
the canvas and put on the blue.
Bill, too, had arbitrarily re-writ
ten the play in small measure, so
as to include just one main male
part and two lesser ones. One of
the lesser he had forced on Jer
emy; the other he would play him
self, doubling after playing the
male lead. And he had written in
two minor feminine roles so that
all six of the girls, in addition to
Gayle, could be accommodated.
Weve got to keep in mind the
fact that these girls are hired to
do Little Theater work,” Bill told
Gayle privately. ‘Mr. Merrifield or-!
dered you and me .to draw Jeremy
out of his shell, and a crowd of
girls around him is the best way
to combait his shyness. He’ll get
used to feminine beauty in time. I
hope.”
‘‘Surely, Bill. We’re making prog
ress already. He enjoyed the par
ty.”
‘‘Did you?”
‘Yes. Until the—the—”
‘I know. It’s a shame.’ ’
‘Where’s Jeremy now?’
‘‘Out on the lawn—guess what
doing?”
‘Meditating?”
# 'Wooing!”
Gayle stopped her work—she had
been memorizing the last of her
play script and she laid it aside
now—to hlook excitedly at Bill.
‘The Tempe person. Four eyes.
I think those glasses she wears
are a bond of respectability be
tween them, even though she ef
fuses a lot. She likes him.”
‘‘So! Well, Jeremy’s not bad,
really, Bill. I can understand how
lempie
Bill didn’t answer that. He looked
quickly, and seriously, at his as
sociate. He remembered that Jer
emy had kissed Gayle with quite
unnecessary ardor only a few days
ago, and he didn’t like Gayle to
be too pleased about the Merrifield
heir.
“Listen, Gayle, you—’ ’But he
halted abruptly. After all, a man
can’t come out and say he loves a
girl, but wants her to wait a year
to discuss it. He was tied up with
promises, obligations, moral and
otherwise. His promised task was,
in fact, to make Jeremy fall for
Gayle herself. He had all but for
gotten that!
“Sure!” he changed his tone.
‘Jeremy’s swell, Gayle. I think he
likes you. You—you musn’t let this
Hyde gall overdo her act. Never
can tell what might happen. You’re
supposed to—to—”
‘I know. Make him woo me. But
I’ve been awfully busy.”
a 1 ' ■
‘Scram right now, and give him
some attention.”
That seemed advisable. She
hadn’t talked to Jeremy all morn
ing, and the hour was almost noon.
She went outside and broke into his
tete-a-tete with Tempe. She felt
that Tempe was just kidding as
usual, teasing and doing whatever
she could for self-entertainment,
and so she could take Jeremy away
smoothly.
But, surprisingly, it didn’t work
out that way.
Gayle threw herself into the
mood of surface gaiety and did
manage to edge Jeremy away—but
when she turned to stick out her
tongue at the smaller girl, purely
in a gesture of teasing and com
radeship, she saw that Tempe’s an
ger was aroused.
This fact was startling. She had
never seen Temple angry. Temple
voiced no objection now; indeed
she smiled quickly and her expres
sion changed, but there had been a
tell-tale moment in which her eyes
revealed much. She spoke lightly
to them and hastened away, but
Gayle wondered—
i m jiuery irom last mgni, ana
am imagining things without real
cause,’ ’she told herself. Doubtless
the apparent flash of meanness in
Tempe’s eyes and face was purely
imaginary, she insisted now. She
turned determinedly to the shy
young man.
‘I want to hear if you enjoyed
tin party, Jeremy.”
“It was very nice.’ ’
“I’m glad. Meet any people you
liked? Any girls?
“I—1—on, yes. Yes. But—”
“Uh huh! Who?’
‘I was going to say—the girls
already here—Miss Hyde, Lola—’
“They are darlings,” Gayle final
ly finished for him. ‘I’m so glad
you can enjoy them. Or us, I should
say. At least, I hope you like me,
too. I want to be friends, Jeremy.”
‘Oh! Oh, Gayle!”
There was no mistaking his tone.
He looked longingly at her, but
fearfully, too. Gayle had to sup
press a smile. Poor Jeremy was a
(Continued on Page Nine)
— --
THIS CURIOUS WORLD

WHEN
WATER.
SOLIDIFIES
IN A
CLOSED
CONTAINER.,
THE ICE
THAT FORMS
EXERTS A
PRESSURE OF
13 TONS
TO THE
SQUARE
INCH.
COPR. 1940 BV NEA SERVICE. INC.
T. M. REG. U. S. RAT. OFF.
OBSERVATIONS
LEAD TO THE
CONCLUSION
THAT
ZX5S4/M5.
I ANSWER: Two. The Tropic of Can
BELA LANAN-COURT REPORTER By LTAllen Heine
ruunucu on Actual uourt Kecords and You Can Be the Judge
The
Strange
Case of
THE MAN
WITHOUT
LEGS

IN SIX
EPISODES
j No. 6
AT LAST—THE OFF ICEp 5 WERE BROUGHT
FACE TO FACE WITH THE MAN SUSPECTED
OF MURDERING MARK GALLO! TONY BOLINA,.
A LEGLESS CRIPPLE / HE WAS ARRESTED
INDICTED, AND THEN.,IN THE LOWER COURT
IDNY BOUMA...^
' A JURY HAS TRIED
YOU ON A CHARGE
' OF SECOND-degree
: MURDER, AND VOU
V HAVE BEEN ROUND f
AND
NON
THE
HIGHER
COURT
HANDS <
DOVtfM k
rr's
j decree !
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THE OECRES Of
THE LOWER COURT
^IS HEREBY ^
i /-w— ^
you BE
twe JUDGE/
What is ydur
OPINION?
WOULD YOU
CONVICT
T6NY Bolin a?
FOR THE REAL
DECISION
•See
PAGE TEN
OUT OUR WAY By J. R. Williams
# GOSH,THAT GUY'S \
I SOT A COLD/CLAMMY \
i HANDSHAKE - - JUST
i LIKE A DEAD FISH IN
i YOUR HAND / I'M SOS
H PlCIOUS OF THEM
' H. KIND OF BIRDS*" /
^ they make A
SHIVERS RUN /
UP MY / -
tupmA TH' KIND Y ,THAT'S. WHY
tamt suspicious x'm a cobweb ,
OPvirrL THY HALE COWBOY TODAY/
AM~HEARTY HAND- X USED TO LIKE
SHAKE WAT PUTS THE* BIS GRIPPY
MEOW THE ALERT/ <5VPPERS,BUT
SHAKER/HAS-Si5S \SHOOK ME DOWN.'
PAsflW^WTEREST Y|/^/TTV "
IW YOU/ nSTHEM ] hJ I <>
breezy squeezers;! (yka&si.
Y THAT— ,Tri f^L
PALM MVSTERV core. IW BY «e> SEaviCE, me. STePregI u. s. p»t. off.^
OUR BOARDING HOUSE . . with . . . Major Hoop!e
_ . ....._— ----
V7H7 UUCOIM »
RELY THESE MOTORIST!
AM SIGNALING FOR A Bl
IP THE HILL TO THE CYC!
MILE CORDIALLY BUT
IAP6 IF I WERE NOT IN
[(CYCLE >**' HMM-*^ I WC
COrrcH-'
HIKING
WITH A
SPARE -
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LITTLE ORPHAN ANNIE Came The Dawn
n m,T m »■ ■ 'ill iJlll'lL H 1 ir ■ J^P11 V ■!« I |J —■ '» 9Jm 1.1 • l ■■! . ,
f\ HARK! SOMETHIN'
8 SLITHERIN' ACROSS TH'
B ROAD OP AHEAD—HEAR
| IT?-THERE! A
I SPLASH™ C'MON—BUT
1 TAKE IT EASY
r* r^TT-— — — ^rsnrznrE&l
)[ LOOK— ITS
BEGINNIN' TO GET ^
LIGHT— OH, BOY—
l DON'T CARE HOId HOT
TH' SUN GETS TODAY—
I'LL SURE BE GLAD
l TO SEE IT- >
I&N*-— _
/three or four if
TIMES LAST NIQHT ^
I DIDNT THINK WE'D
EVER SEE ANOTHER
SUNRISE-BUT HERE
VIE ARE. SANDY
( BUT I'D NEVER BE ABLE
1 TO STAND ANOTHER NKJHT
LIKE THAT— WE’VE QOT
TO COME OUT ON TH‘ MAIN
ROAD PRETTV SOON—
WE’VE OUST GOT TO- —-fig
arf!
WASH TUBBS The Hand Of Evil _ By Roy Crane
I GENTLEMEN, YOU'RE LOOKING AT THE TEST MODEL OF WHAT
WE BELIEVE TO BE THE FASTEST FIGHTING SHIP ON EARTH
IF SUCCESSFUL, IT WILL REVOLUTIONIZE AIR COMBAT, -t
I ^OKAY, JIMMIE, TAKE 'ER UP j-——-'
i- L —-r/~~
hour; WOW)
wow IF i
CAU PULL
THIS 6ABV /
OUT OF A h
WELL DONE, COMRADES! THAHKS1
TO YOUR CLEVER SABOTAGE, WE
HAVE DESTROYED CONFIDENCE
IN THEIR PLANE, AND DELAYED
PRODUCTION FOR MONTHS 'j
" T/- -
COT^E^BYSsilW^S'^M.'ltEC.'Xsr^A^O^^^S
GASOLINE ALLEY Hail, Hail
FINALLY COT <
«Wj BACK TO SEE
S THE CLP FOLKS
A *r «OME- y
NOT TO MENTION SOME \
HOME COOKED FOOD, )
. AUNTIE BLOSSOM. J
Ev-~.—...
lif DON'T YOU WORRY, Ip
■ S KEEZM. RACHEL'S W,
- GOT A DINNER READY K
FOR YOU FIT FORA Jm
w A-ia -v] -
B ' — .. . 1 fl — '—H|
5 tT'S-'SKBEZM NO, SIB! OChtX
HE'S OWE OF WE YOU WATCH-DOC
FAMILY, LOLiXPOP! '
,r# ■
THE GUMPS Not Even Your Blessing, Mamma?
/se> vou TWO CwAlUbRtM A
\ ARE XAARRlECs? Ak-L6W \j L.
I **E TO BE THE FIRST To ^
\ OFFER OONfaRATUUA'nQKJs) ,
\OEFFERSOM UQMES* _ / HUMPH. /
BOV E-THE ONE AND
6RC.E THAT CAM OUEMCH
IKES. OP NATE \NHICH ARE ,
TCMiNCj to
v^e rms
3—1 Ca WE
'CO NT
.
W -AMO, IF I '
f AMTTHIM^i To SAi' ABOUT
i >T, THAT'S ALLVOU /
CjIVETHEMj/ /
BRICK BRADFORD—Seeks the Diamond Doll By William Ritt and Clarence Gray

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