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The Wilmington morning star. [volume] (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, July 19, 1940, Image 5

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1940-07-19/ed-1/seq-5/

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DEFENSE TRAINING
PLANS UNDER WAY
yen Are Being Selected To
Take Courses At New Han
over High School
TI1P interviewing and selection of
„ f0r the special training program
pored by the federal government
ft the purpose of preparing them
or jobs in biS industrial plants In
' onneetion with the United States’
laments program is progressing
-atisfactorily, Maurice H. Moore,
manager of the Wilmington office of
he xorth Carolina State Employ
ment service, said yesterday.
Instructors for the various courses
liave arrived in the city and the
ivork shops are being prepared for
-lasses beginning Monday, July 22.
The courses are being given by the
Vew Hanover board of vocational
educational in cooperation with the
s,ate and federal governments.
Courses in various work will he of
no expense to the workers who are
selected on the basis of interests,
aptitude and potential ability to suc
ceed and profitably and creditably
utilize the training.
In the early fall, night courses
1 be available to workers who
have been or are now employed in
some occupation, but whose skill
and knowledge needs to be extended
to meet anticipated demands for ad
ditional workers and better trained
craftsmen.
Those interested in the present
daytime classes are asked to contact
the local employment office for full
information.
Preliminary courses include acety
lene-arc welding, machine shop work,
sheet metal, forging or blacksmith
ing, ship and general carpentry and
form building. Sketching and blue
print reading will also be stressed.
t hadbourn Youth Hurt
When Run Over By^Car
WHITEVILLE, July 18.—T h e
condition of Fred Carter, 18, who
was injured this morning when he
was run over by a truck at the
Wayside service station at Chad
bourn, was reported as “pretty
good” at the Columbus county hos
pital tonight.
The extent of his injuries had
not yet been determined.
Young Carter attempted to climb
on the running board of the service
station wrecker as it was being
driven out of the station by J. B.
McClelland. His foot slipped and
the young man fell beneath the
rear wheel of the truck, which
passed over his body.
Carter is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. F. O. Carter, of Chadbourn.
-advertisement
..Help Build up Relief from—^
female
FUNCTIONAL
COMPLAINTS
Trv Lvdla E- Plnkham’s Vegetable
compound to help relieve monthly
min headaches, backache and
also calm Irritable, restless nerves
to such functional disorders.
Plnkham’s Compound Is simply mar
velous to help build up resistance
forweak^tlre^w^emTryltl^^
Sale
MEN'S'
Suits
*14
Tropical Worsteds and
Linens. Values to $19.95.
In grays, blues, and tans.
Both two and three but
ton coats. Sizes 85 to 50.
Sale
MEN'S'
SUITS
*9.95
Tropical Worsteds, Lin
ens, and Rivercools. Most
of these are belted back
suits, some are plain back.
Values from $12.50 to
?24.75.
Week-End SALE
PLAY SHOES
*1.49
. You can get a season’s wear by buying these shoes now. The
sizes are broken but you can be fitted in some pattern. These
are broken lots in our regular $2.00 and $2.45 shoes. Keddettes
included. All colors.
177 PAIRS
ODDS AND ENDS—LADIES'
White Sandals, Pumps & Oxfords
| *1.00 1
Summer DRESSES
Reduced
Va to Vz
REGULAR PRICE
ly A11 summer cottons and most of our silks and rayons great
what Ueed' In this sale outstanding values you’ll surely find
niai iou want to finish this summer with. All colors in both
[ n and prints. Sizes 12 to 52. ___
faelkUHllianib Go.
DAILY CROSSWORD
ACROSS
1. Lazy person
6. Quick
11. Feminine
name
12. Aloft
13. Plays
15. Silkworm
16. Peruvian
Indian
17. Maker of
hats
19. Kind of tree
20. Father of
Odin
21. Doctor of
Science
(abbr.)
vvuiu-rnym
ing game
25. Attic
28. S-shaped
molding
31. In advance
32. Units of
weight (Ind.)
33. Profit
34. Cavalry
swords
35. Scanty
37. Aetatis (abbr.
39. Deceive
40. Away
43. Cry loudly
46. Russian
mountains
4(7. Cast
48. City in
New York
50. Avid
52. Opposite
middle of
ship’s side
53. Slumber
54. Shapes
DOWN
1. Asian country
2. Mends by
weaving
3. Fresh
water fish
4. Girl’s name
5. Narrow inlet
6. Sun god
7. Incite
8. Harbor
9. Covered
with ivy
10. Darlings
L4.'Young hog
L8. Chair part
20. Reared
22. Crotchety
person
23. Dunce
24. Eye
25. Silence
by force
26. Exclama*
tion
27. Brazilian
coins
29. Organ of
hearing
30. Letter S
32. Narrow
band of linen
34. Facial
expression
36. Sick
37. Powdered
lava
38. Adequate
40. Large bay g
window
41. Electrical
capacity unil
42. Deceives
44. Incite
Yesterday’s Answer
45. To the lee
46. Boss of a shield
49. Escape (slang)
51. Regius Pro
fessor (abbr.)
, Distributed by King Features synaicaie, me..
WALLACE LEADING
VICE PRESIDENTIAL
VOTE AT CHICAGO
(Continued From Page One)
ederal Loan administrator, were
before the conventiion, in addition
to those of McNutt and Wallace.
Jones had important support in
James A. Farley, the chairman of
the democratic national commit
tee.
In Washington, President Roose
velt awaited the convention’s ac
tion before delivering an address
to it by radio, a speech whose con
tents a secretary said would be
dependent upon the vice presiden
tial choice.
Evidence of considerable dissat
isfaction with the choice of Wal
lace came at the close of the
speech nominating him when boos
loudly blended with cheers from
the audience.
Want “Democrat”
From one section of the hall a
few were calling: ’’We want a
Democrat,” evidently referring to
Wallace’s one-time affiliation with
the republican party.
As delegates thronged to the eve
ning session Mr. Roosevelt sent
a wire to his floor manager here,
Senator James F. Byrnes of South
Carolina. It said:
“Under normal circumstances, I
would have gone to Chicago in per
son but in these difficult days, I
must not, in the public interest, go
so far away (from Washington).
“I send my warm and affection
ate greetings to a democratic gath
ering which appreciate to the full
the permanent value of our Ameri
can institutions and our determin
ation to preserve them for gener
ations yet unborn.” 1
In addition, Mr. Roosevelt said
he hoped it would be “In accord
with the convenience of the con
vention” if he should deliver his
speech at eight p. m., C.S.T., to
night.
There was a sharp implication
in the telegram, which was quick
ly caught by convention observers.
It was that the President, upon
his acceptance, would do his cam
paigning mostly from Washington
—a figurative White House portico
campaign.
In addition to the presidential
address, the evening’s schedule in
cluded an appearance by Mrs.
Roosevelt, who flew in from New
York to do, as she put it, whatever
Chairman James A. Farley of the
national committee, might assign
her to do. Report had it, that she
might make a brief address to the
convention.
The selection of a Roosevelt
Wallace ticket presented Wendell
L. Willkie and his republicans no!
only with the third term challenge,
but the issue of a democratic slate
which is solidly and uncompromis
ingly for the New Deal.
The strategy apparently was to
offset the farm-belt influence of
Senator Charles L. McNary, the re
publican vice-presidential nominee,
with Wallace, who as secretary of
agriculture since 1933 is widely
ki.own in the rural areas.
As the crowd gathered in the sta
dium where hundreds of fans were
busy under the hot lights above,
Mrs. Roosevelt reached Chicago by
airplane. She told reporters at the
airport that she could “Not im
agine anyone in the world, as it is
today, wishing to carry the re
sponsibility of being head of a gov
ernment.”
She had a broad smile for those
who had gathered to meet her,
which changed to seriousness when
a reporter asked about the third
term and she replied:
“It’s not one’s individual respon
sibility-mental and physical re
sponsibility—the responsibility for
the role one’s country has in the
world today.”
She had never asked Mr. Roose
velt and he had never volunteered
any information on his third-term
plans, she said.
COSTLY MEAL
RALEIGH, July 18— (IP) —T. M.
Hines of Charlotte, estimated today
that it cost him $170 to eat a meal
here. Hines said that while he was
in a restaurant a thief broke into
his car and stole three suits and a
black zipper bag.
WENDELL WILLK1E
CLUB IS PLANNED
Organization Of Group Under
Way Here; Spillman Tem
porary Chairman
Organization of a Willkie-for
President club is now under way
in New . Hanover county, John
Spillman, Jr., temporary chairman
of the organization, said last night.
The action is the result of a
meeting of members of the re
publican party here several days
ago. The coming presidential cam
paign was discussed at length and
it was decided to name a commit
tee to make plans for the club.
Spillman was chosen temporary
chairman of this group and other
members are John H. Niggel, Miss
Sarah Bradshaw, Mrs. C. M. Wal
dorf and J. B. Swails. A meeting
of the committee is planned within
the near future, Spillman said.
The group has contacted the
state organization, as well as Will
kie headquarters in New Yorit, he
stated.
“It is the intention of the club
to acquaint every voter in New
Hanover with the qualifications of
Mr. Wendell Willkie for the White
House and its activity will be in
creased as the national campaign
progresses,” he said.
Expansion of the club outside
New Hanover county is also con
templated, it was reported.
Supervisors* Importance
Is Stressed By Gardiner
ASHEVILLE, July 18.—(iR—
More than 125 of the south’s lead
ing industrial executives were told
here today that supervisors were
the key factors in a sound program
of building better employer-em
ploye relations.
The executives, meeting in the
annual Southern Industrial Execu
lives conference at the Battery
Park hotel, were warned by Glenn
Gardiner, of Passaic, N. J., editor
of Management Information and
assistant to the president of Forst
m&nn woolen mills, that the im
portance of the supervisor’s posi
tion could not be ignored.
“Management must make super
vision the spearhead in building
better employer - employe rela
tions,” he said. “To this end, su
pervisors must be brought into and
held within the management cir
cle. To accomplish this, manage
ment must keep the supervisors
informed and, in addition, man
agement-minded.” 1
Johnson Will Seek To
Purchase State Bonds
RALEIGH, July 18— (IP) —State
Treasurer Charles M. Johnson left
tonight for New York <o attempt to
purchase approximately $500,000
worth of North Carolina bonds for
the sinking fund.
Johnson said the state had follow
ed the policy of keeping its own
bonds, rather than cash, in the sink
ing fund, in order that the interest
-might be saved. At present the sink
ing fund contains North Carolina
bonds worth approximately $17,500,
000.
- - ■ ■ - \
The pigmy marmoset, one of the
smallest of monkeys, weighs less
than a pound.
British Requisition
French Merchant Ship
LONDON, July 18.—If)—A 1
French merchant ships in Britis
ports are being requisitioned fc
the duration of the war, the mini:
try of shipping announced tonigh
France will receive the ship
back and be paid for their use “at
the end of the war,” the announce^
S ment said.
French officers and seamen will
1 be given opportunity for employ
a ment in this connection, and
r “many have accepted.” 1
When in full >ving, a bee’s flight
s is much faster than that of a bird.
»_
• You wouldn’t play golf in a tuxedo.
You want comfortable clothes . . .
and underwear.
Hanes Crotch-Guard Sports give
free play to leg muscles. An all-round
Lastex band gives more “play” at the
waist. The Hanesknit Crotch-Guard
provides gentle, athletic support. Con
venient, buttonless fly-front.
Score in sports and feel spruce at
work with Hanes Crotch-Guard
Sports. They team up best with a
Hanes Undershirt. See your Hanes
Dealer today.
HANES SPORTS
CROTCH-GUARD 0
35* and 50* (shown above)
HANES SHIRTS
AND BROADCLOTH
SHORTS
35e, 3 fwr$l
P. H. HANES KNITTING COMPANY
Winston-Salem, N. C
A COMPLETE LINE
HANES UNDERWEAR
FOR MEN & BOYS
| “...THAT’S WHERE WE’LL GO!” |
You add to your own enjoyment and protect your 1 1
right to drink GOOD beer when you choose to ! j
drink it only in those retail establishments that are | |
clean, inviting and LAW-ABIDING. I |
Investigation has proved that the great majority of ] ]
North Carolina’s retail beer outlets are decent, re- . .
spectable places of legitimate business. However, | |
there are bound to be a certain small number in I I
the group who are "black sheep" in that they per- I I
jnit anti-social practices in their places of business 1 1
or indulge in them themselves. j j
Desiring to eliminate the objectionable places, the I I
Brewers and North Carolina Beer Distributors Com- 1 1
mittee has cooperated fully with law enforcement ^ '
officials and to date 90 of them have lost their j [
licenses and several score others have been denied | |
new licenses because they refused to “clean up" | |
during the past year. I |
► So . . . when you say: “That’s where we’ll go!", be ! !
sure it is the RIGHT kind of Tetail beer outlet. I |
mmiiiimmiiimimiMiiimmimiimiiiimmii
SCHENLEY Black Label
65% grain neutral spirits
n '1.40 ti ‘2.70
SCHENLEY Red Label
72%% grain neutral spirits
^r’1.15 qt.*2.20
loth Blended Whiskey and 90 Proof. Schi
>
inley Distillers Corporation, New York City
America
goes
ALLSTATE!
1
l
| 40-million tires have lost their Jobs to
ALLSTATE!
Every day—every hour, all over this great
nation, prudent motorists are replacing their
old tires with new ALLSTATES.
For two reasons: First, because there’s
no better tire in the world than ALLSTATE—
a fact conclusively proved, both in test and in
traffic. And, secondly—because, due to Sears
simple system of distribution, ALLSTATE
TIRES COST LESS MONET than any one
of the other four admittedly top-flight brands.
“SO”—America savs—"since no maker can
possibly put more service and safety into ANT
tire, at ANT price—WHT LET ’EM ADD IT
ONTO TOUR BILL?
Tour old tires may still have more miles
in them—but isn’t it better to replace them
thirty days too son than THIRTT SECONDS
TOO LATE?
Let us fix you up with new ALLSTATES
all around—TODAT!
Easy payments, if you choose.
New tires mounted FREE.
And you’ll drive away “with safety on all
four corners”—and UNSPENT money in your
pockets.
Size Old Price New Price
....450x21_|_10.30_|_7.15~
! _475x19_|___ 10.40... |___7.45___
—525x17_j___1165lirj__.7.85—
—550x17_j_13.65_j_8.75_
-625x16_|_15.70_j_9.50_
....650x16—. I—16j5—l_. 10,65...
These prices include year old iires
Allstate
Non-Skid or Rib Tread 600x1#
—ORDINARILY AT LEAST A $12.50 VALUE
Prices quoted here are on the standard
600x16, most popular selling size—for other
sizes, see charts.
Here’s the tire that
started the stampede to
Sears—good old reliable
ALLSTATE! A glutton
for punishment! A life
preserver in today’s
give - and - take traffic!
Genteel! Aristocratic!
Tough!
SUPERBLY engineer
ed! Made of the very fin
est and most costly ma
terials, and UNCONDI
TIONALLY GUARAN
TEED FOR 18 MONTHS
ARGOSY TIRES
$4.45
4.40x21
Sears challenge to
the low-price field.
A truly good inex- l
pensive tire. To
even approach it in
quality elsewh ere
be prepared to pay |
about $7.__
It's Great To Be Alive!
RIDE ON SEARS TIRES
CROSS
COUNTRY
100 Per Cent Pure Pennsylvania Motor Oil
!In Your Container
Fed. Tax Included
Cross Country saves you up to 50% at time
of purchase. It does not break down and boil
away like ordinary quality oils.
10-QUART d»l QA
CAN . $1.09
ENERGEX BATTERY I
With Old
Battery
Guaranteed 12 months. Fits model "T,”
"A” and “B" Fords, Chevrolets, Plymouths,
Dodges, Pontiacs, Oldsmobiles; light Buicks and
others. 39 full-size plates ... 95 ampere
output.
CROSS COUNTRY ir
BATTERY .
24 MOS. GUARANTEE
j gV * ■ vH a V J mJK p f I I V ■ i I r ^
307 NORTH FRONT STREET DIAL 6038
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