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The Wilmington morning star. [volume] (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, August 26, 1940, Image 10

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SPORTS
BEES BEAT CARDS,
STOP WIN STREAK
Seventh Place Bees Win First
Tilt 4-1, But Lose
Second 8 To 5
ST. LOUIS, Aug. 25.—(jB—Bos
ton’s seventh-place Bees broke the
Cardinals’ blazing winning streak
at nine straight games by taking
the first half of today’s double
header, 4 to 1, but the Cards re
bounded with an 8 to 5 victory in
the nightcap to remain firmly in
third place.
Only after a bitter struggle were
the Redbirds able to win the sec
ond encounter. They were lead
ing, 4 to 1, after five innings but
Boston rushed ahead, 5-4, in the
sixth.
Then Enos' Slaughter, whose
home run accounted for the Cards’
lone tally in the first game, tied
up the count with a timely single
in the seventh. Johnny Mize
promptly inserted his 37th homer
of the season with a mate on base
to decide the battle.
The Bees outhit the Cards, 13 to
10, in the second tilt but the latter
proftied through a pair of Boston
errors.
Max Lanier, who relieved Carl
Doyle when the bases were loaded
in the sixth, was credited with
the victory.
(First Game)
ST. TOUIS Ab R H O A
Heffner, 2b_ 5 114 5
Laabs, rf - 6 12 10
R a del iff, If- 51210
Judnich, cf - 4 13 3 0
Clift, 3b _- 3 10 0 3
McQuinn, lb_ 5 13 9 0
Berardino, ss - 4 114 3
Susce, c_ 5 0 15 0
Niggeling, p - 4 0 2 0 1
Totals _ 41 7 15 27 If
BOSTON Ab R H O .4
JliMaggio. cf_ 5 0 12 0
Cramer, cf- 4 0 0 2 0
Foxx. c _ 3 114 0
Williams-, If - 2 0 2 0 0
Cronin, ss- 4 0 12 4
Hoerr.l 2b _ 3 0 0 4 5
Finney, lb- 4 0 0 12 1
Gelbert. 3b- 4 0 0 1 2
Os-termueller, p- 2 12 0 3
Hickman, p- 10 10 1
Spence, z - 1 0 0 0 0 j
Totals _ 33 2 8 27 1C ;
z-Batted for Diekman in 9th.
St. Louis_000 030 301—7
Boston _ 000 110 000—2
Errors: Susce. Cronin. Doerr. Runs
batted in : MeQuinn 4. Radcliff 2, Niff
poling. Williams. Two base hits: Rad
cliff. "MeQuinn. Home run: MeQuinn
Stolen bases: Williams. Sacrifices:
Nigffeling. Double plays: Berardino
Heffner to MeQuinn : Cronin. Doerr to
Finney: Doerr. Cronin to Finney. Left
on bases: St. Louis 13: Boston 8. Bases
on balls off: Niggeling 4. Ostermueller
4. Diekman 1. Strikeouts by: Niggel
incr 4. Ostermueller 2. Diekman 1. Hits
off: Ostermueller 13 in 6 2-3 innings:
Diekman 2 in 2 1-3. Wild pitches: Os
termueller 2. Niggeling. Losing pitch
er: Ostermueller. Umpires: Summers.
Basil and Grieve. Time: J:30. Attend
ance: (estimated) 17,000.
(Second Game)
ST. LOUIS Ab R H O A
Heffner. 2b _ 3 12 1 2
Laabs. rf_ 4 0 0 1 0
Radcliff, If_ 3 113 0
Jndnich, cf- 3 0 13 0
Clift. 3b_ 3 0 0 0 1
MeQuinn. lb_—- 3 1 1 10 I
Berardino, ss_- 3 0 0 1 4
Susce, c_- 3 0 110
Mills.* p_ 0 0 0 0 0
Hudlin, p _ 2 0 10 3
Bildilli. p_ 0 0 0 0 0
Kennedy, x_ 1 0 0 0 0
Coffman, p_— 0 0 0 1 1
Totals _ 28 3 7 21 12
x-Batted for Bildilli in 7th.
BOSTON AbBHOA
DiMaggio. cf- 5 2 12 0
Cramer, rf_ 4 2 1 0 0
Foxx. c- 4 3 3 7 1
Williams. If_ 2 2 110
Cronin, ss_ 5 12 0 1
Doerr. 2b _ 4 3 2 4 2
Finney, lb_, 5 12 4 0
Gelbert, 3b_ 4 1111
Wilson, p_ 4 2 2 2 0
Totals _ 37 17 15 21 V
St. Louis___ 200 000 1— 3
Boston _301 10(11) 1—17
Errors: Clift. Runs batted in: Heff
ner, Radcliff, Judnich, Foxx 5, Finney
3, Williams 2, Cronin 2. Cramer, Doerr,
Gelbert, Wilson. Two base hits: Foxx
2. DiMaggio. Three base hits: Radcliff.
Home runs: Foxx, Doerr. Stolen bases:
Doerr. Left on bases: St. Louis 5:
Boston 7. Bases on halls off: Mills 2.
Ilndlin 4. Wilson 1, Bildilli 2. Strikeouts
by: Hudlin 1, Wilson 7. Hits off: Mills
t in 2-3 innings; Hudlin 8 in 4 2-3; Bil
riilli 2 in 2-3; Coffman 1 in 1. Wild
pitches: Wilson. Losing pitcher: Mills.
Umpires: Basil, Grieve, Summers. Time:
1:56. Attendance: (actual) 18,600.
ALL THIS PEPSI-COLA
i
Yea sir; that handy family
carton of Pepsi-Cola holds
6 big bottles ... 12 big
drinks. And say — just
watch the folks go for this
better drink with the finer
flavor. Be prepared! Al
ways keep a carton of
*
for 25
• STANDINGS
YESTERDAY’S RESULTS
American League
St. Louis 7-3: Boston 2-17.
Chicago 1-1; New York O-o.
Detroit 7: Philadelphia 3.
Washington 5; Cleveland 4.
National League
Brooklyn 3-S: Pittsburgh 4-1.
Cincinnati ?-6; Philadelphia 2-5.
New York 4-12; Chicago o-S.
Boston 4-5; St. Louis 1-S.
THE STANDINGS
American League
Won Lost Pet.
Cleveland-2- 71 50 .58i
Detroit _ 69 53 .066
New York- 64 54 -04
Boston _ 6o o7 .533
Chicago- 62 06 .o..j
Washington-o. 6< .4ch
St. Louis- 51 72 .41o
Philadelphia _ 46 70 -391
National League
Won Lost Pet
Cincinnati - 74 43 .632
Brooklyn _ 67 51 .568
►St. Louis_- 61 54 .530
New York_ 60 55 .52.
Pittsburgh _- 59 58 .504
Chicago _- 61 60 .504
Boston_ 46 71 .393
Philadelphia_ 38 74 .339
TODAY’S GAYLES
NEW YORK, Aug. 25.—(£>)—Probable
pitchers in the major leagues tomorrow
(won-lost records in parentheses):
American League
St. Louis at Boston—Harris (8-10) vs.
Johnson (4-2).
Chicago at New York—Rigney (11-14)
vs. Chandler (7-5).
Detroit at Philadelphia—Rowe (11-3)
vs. Caster (4-16).
Cleveland at Washington — Harder
(8-9) vs. Leonard (13-12).
National League
Boston at St. Louis (night)—Sullivan
(9-13) vs. McGee (12-9).
Brooklyn at Pittsburgh — Flowers
(1-0) vs. Sewell (11-3).
Philadelphia at Cincinnati (2)—Pear
son (2-9) and Smoll (2-6) vs. Walters
(17-9) and Beggs (7-2).
New York at Chicago—dumbert (9-11)
vs. Olsen (9-S).
JUNIOR LOOP DRAFTS
SECOND HALF SLATE
Dry Pond Sluggers, First Half
Champs, To Play 7-Ups This
Afternoon
The schedule for play in the
second half of the Junior softball
League’s season w a s announced
yesterday by the loop’s officials.
Play will start this morning at
1:30 o’clock at Pembroke Jones
playground when the Yankees
neet the Dawson Street Sluggers.
\t 3:30 this afternoon, the Dry
Pond Sluggers, first half cham
pions, will tangle with the 7-Ups.
Since the end of the first halt,
a new team, the Brookwood Ti
gers, has joined the league.
The second half schedule, all
games in which will be played
aither at 9:30 a. m. or at 3:30 p. m.,
is as follows
August 27 Brookwood vs. 7-Up,
Pembroke Jones.
August 28: Dry Pond vs. Daw
son street at Robert Strange and
i-Up vs. Yankees at Pembroke
Jones.
August 29: Brookwood vs. Dry
Pond at Robert Strange.
August 30: Brookwood vs. Yank
ees at 22nd and Market.
Sept. 2: Dry Pond vs. Yankees
at Pembroke Jones and 7-Up vs.
Dawson street at Bellamy park.
Sept. 3: Dry Pond vs. Brook
wood at 22nd and' Market.
Sept. 4: Dry Pond vs. 7-Up at
Bellamy Park and Yankees vs.
Dawson St. at Robert Strange.
Sept. 5: Brookwood vs. Dry Pond
at 22nd and Market.
Sept. 6: Brookwood vs. Yankees
at Pembroke Jones.
Sept. 9: Dry Pond vs. Yankees
at Robert Strange and 7-Up vs.
Dawson street at Robert Strange.
Sept. 10: Dry Pond vs. Brook
wood at Robert Strange. 1
M’KEHHAN LEADS
SOFTBALL LOOPS
Ethyl-Dow Catcher Hits 15
Times In 28 Chances For
Average Of .535
For the second consecutive week,
Harlan McKeithan, Ethyl-Dow’s
slugging catcher, is leading all hit
ters in the Independent and Com
mercial softball leagues with 20 or
more times at bat. McKeithan’s
average stands at 15 hits in 28
chances for a percentage of .535.
Burney Covington, spofford's first
baseman, has the top mark in the
Commercial. At bat 46 times, he has
connected safely for 22 hits and a
average of .478.
With Spofford playing the Brigade
tonight and Ethyl-Dow clashing with
Wertheimer’s Bagmakers, the fate
of the second half winners will be
with certain reservations, decided.
If the Bag company takes Ethyl
Dow it can make preparations for
the Independent finals.
If Spofford wins, it must take on
either the Firemen or Sunshine
Laundry Tuesday to settle their race
with the Brigadiers.
The top hitters in the Commercial
league are as follows:
Spofford Mills
AB H
Bearden _51 21 .411
Covington __4G 22 .478
Fowler__ 23 8 .348
Horne _41 18 .438
T. Stephens _ 27 12 .444
Balard..— 20 7 .350
Boy’s Brigade
Everett _ 33 13 .390
Sandlin _ 38 17 .441
J. Allen _ 39 14 .381
Jeffords_ 28 10 .357
O. Allen _ 17 6 .345
Sunshine Laundry
Davis _ 36 11 .306
Weeks _ 18 7 .388
American Bakery
Bender_ 32 13 .406
Company "A’s” record has not
changed it was previously published.
INDEPENDENT LEAGUE
Wertheimer Bag Co.
AB H
Peiper _ 40 15 .375
Bishop _- 45 18 .400
Hansley _- 43 18 .444
Cherry _36 15 .416
Steele _ 14 5 .357
Thomas _ 46 14 .388
Fountain _ 40 14 .350
Ethyl-Dow
H. McKeithan_ 28 15 .535
Herring - 39 14 .359
J. McKeithan _ 24 8 .333
E. W. Godwin’s Sons
Scott _ 29 11 .379
Trask - 17 9 .588
City Optical
Banks _ 44 15 .431
Moore _ 38 13 .342
Johnson - 30 9 .300
Mote .. 30 11 .360
Beale _ 30 11 .360
ATint* 19 9 .310
Taylor-Colquitt
Shoaf -“85
Singleton _ -409
Paige - •‘*80
J. McKeithan _-310
D. High _-393
FRANCE’S ARMY CUT
TO 100,000 TROOPS
Military Authorities Say Millions
Of Reservists Have Been
Demobilized
VICHY, France, Aug. 25.—(AT—
France’s standing armed forces,
including militarized police, have
been reduced almost to the 100,
000 men permitted under the ar
mistice with Germany, military au
thorities reported today.
Demobilization of millions of re
servists recently has been carried
out, they said, under the eyes of
German officers sent into the un
occupied areas of France to su
pervise the operations.
The permanent army remaining
will be composed of professional
soldiers recruited from time to
time as needed and will include
about 20,000 mobile guards, or mil
itary police. 2
COOPER’S TOPS-3 WINS
WITH 69.80 M. P. H.
RED BANK, N. J., Aug. 25.—I®
—Jack (Pop) Cooper, veteran Kan
sas City speedboat driver, sent his
225-cubic inch hydroplane Tops III
across the North Shrewsbury river
at a 70 mile an hour clip today to
win the National Sweepstakes race
as the bigger, faster craft failed
to finish.
Herbert Mendelson’s Notre
Dame, the big Gold Cup racer from
Detroit which won ^yesterday’s all
opening heat in record time, could
not finish the second heat today.
George Cannon’s Grey Goose of
New Rochelle, N. Y., also dropped
out after leading the way on the
first lap.
Miss uireDau, onveu uy iau>
Wood of Detroit, was the only oth
er boat to race in the final heat
and thus earned second place in
the final standing. 2
Thomas Wants Madden
Reappointed NLRB Head
WASHINGTON, Aug. 25.——
Senator Thomas (D-Utah), chair
man of the senate labor commit
te expressed the hope today that
President Roosevelt would reap
point J. Warren Madden as chair
man of the labor relations board.
Madden’s five-year term expires
Tuesday.
“I think Mr. Madden has done
a very good job,” Thomas told re
porters, “and all things considered
I believe he has earned reappoint
ment ”
DAILY CROSSWORD
ACROSS
1. Establish
4. Girl’s name
7. Capital of
France
10. African
water lily
12. Keen
13. Ceased
sleeping
14. Definite
article
15. Disfigure
17. Edible seed
18. Sells
20. Carry
23. sewing
instrument
27. The holm oak
28. Conjunction
29. Uncooked
30. Alcoholic
liquor
31. Affirmative
votes
32. Corroded
33. Evening
(poet.)
34. Sun god
35. Arabian ruler
36. Go back
38. Supplies
with men
39. Bundles
41. To lose
firmness
44. Born
45. Mineral spring
48. Adhere closelj
50. Rabbit fur
52. Accede
53. Cost
54. Evil
55. A marble
DOWN
1. A quarrel
2. Every one
3. Real
4. On top
5. Nobleman
6. At sea
8. Neuter
pronoun
9. Covered with
small fig
ures (Her.)
[0. Pantries
LI. Cry of pain
L6. Nuisance
L8. Harass
L9. Selenium
(sym.)
!0. Beast of
prey
21. A fruit
22. Doctrine
24. A play
25. A language
26. Wide
mouthed jugs
31. Adjust
35. Type
measures
37. Aloft
40. Source of
iodine
41. Crust over
a sore
42. A seaweed
43. Encircle
45.Iron rod
for meat
46. Size of type
■Ell
IdIoMdI
' 1—3 0-2*
Yesterday’* An»wer
47. Afresh
49. Neon (sym.)
51. Land measure
'
Distributed by King Features Syndicate. Inc.
V eteranAndRookieStar
As Yanks, Sox Split Bill
Lyons Wins First For Chi
cago, 1-0; Rookie Bonham
Takes Second, 3-1
1
NEW YORK, Aug. 25.—LB—Two
pitchers—one a veteran who has
been fooling American league bat
ters for 18 years—the other a rook
ie appearing in his fifth major
league game, commanded top bill
ing as the Yankees and the Chi
cago White Sox halved a double
header before a top-coated audi
ence of 70,740 spectators today.
Cagey Ted Lyons, 39-year-old,,
wonder, out-pitched Red Ruffing to
stop the Yank string of victories
at six when he tossed a magnifi
cent three hitter to win 1—0 in the
opening game, while Big Ernie
Bonham, 220-pound recruit from
Kansas City, gained the Yankees
an even split for the day, besting
tall Thornton Lee, 3—1 in the night
cap.
The opener, a scoreless contest
for eight innings, was won in the
ninth when Taft Wright doubled
home Luke Appling, who had sing
led. Lyons, in gaining his 10th
win, allowed but one Yankee to
reach third.
Bonham, who permitted five hits
and did not issue a pass in the
after-piece, kept the White Sox
away from the plate in all in
nings but the fifth—when Appling
doubled and Wright singled him
home.
The Yanks, held runless for 12
innings, pushed over two runs in
the fourth on four singles and add
ed their final score in the fifth
when Frank Crosetti, who doubled,
scored on Joe Gordon’s single to
left field.
(First Game)
CHICAGO Ab R H O A
Hayes, 2b- 4 0 0 2 3
Kreevich, cf_ 4 0 13 0
Kuhel, lb_ 2 0 0 7 2
Solters, If_ 4 0 0 3 0
Appling, ss - 4 12 11
Wright, rf- 2 0 13 0
Tresh, c - 3 0 0 4 0
Kennedy, 3b _ 4 0 0 1
Lyons, p- 4 0 13 2
Totals - 31 1 5 27 11
NEW YORK Ab R H O A
Gordon, 2b_ 3 0 0 7 1
Itolfe, 3b _ 4 0 0 2 4
Henrich, rf-of_ 4 0 0 3 0
BiMaggio, cf- 10 10 0
Keller, rf_ 3 0 0 1 0
Selkirk, If_ 4 0 0 2 0
Dickey, c _ 2 0 0 4 0
Dahlgren, lb_ 3 0 18 0
Crosetti, ss_ 2 0 10 1
Ruffing, p - 3 0 0 0 1
Totals - 29 0 3 27 7
Chicago - 000 000 001—1
New York _ 000 000 000—0
Errors: Appling, Selkirk. Runs bat
ted in: Wright. Two base hits: Cro
setti, Appling, Wright. tSolen base:
Kuhel. Sacrfiices: Gordon, Tresh. Dou
ble play: Lyons, Kennedy and Kuhel.
Left on bases: New York 5; Chicago 8.
liases on bails off: Ruffing 4, Lyons 2.
Strikeuots by: Ruffing 4, Lyons 3. Um
pires: Rommel, Hubbard and Moriarty.
Time: 1:55. Attendance: about 70,000.
(Second Game)
CHICAGO Ab t H O A
Hayes, 2b - 3 0 2 2 1
Silvestri, x- 1 0 0 0 0
Kreevich, cf -- 3 0 0 1 0
Rosenthal, xx _ 10 10 0
Kuhel, lb _ 4 0 0 9 1
Solters. If- 4 0 0 2 0
Appling ss _ aiiofi
Wright, rf_ 1 0 13 0
Turnr, c _ 3 0 0 5 O
Kennedy. 3b -1 3 0 0 0 1
nee, p- 3 0 0 0 0
Totals - 31 1 ft 24 o
X lor Hayes in 9th
NEW YORKf0r Kreevich o a
Roife, 3b _— i ? J g 3
Selkirk, If __ 2 n i t 1
Powell, rf .. , ? , J ‘
Dahlgren, lb 2 n n in S
Crosetti, ss “ ? 10 2
Bonham, p 3 l £ J ®
Totals - oT 77
Chicago 31 3 8 27 10
Sew lor-k-T--— % 210 «
ki?rrpSow?rVr?gUhntS W *» = Sel
base hits: Appling ’pr?drfc!?n' Two
base: Gordon. Double plays? Da h?°lcr'
Crosetti and Dahlgren • SLi *h gren'
and Kuhel. Left on hoc -^PPling
4; Chicago 3 Strikeout ®^ Yor*
4, Lee 2. Umpires ■ S : ,?onllam
and Rommel. Time* Moriarty
70,740. Aiine. 1.3d. Attendance:
Movie Revues
“HOUSE ACROSS THE BAY’
FEATURED AT CAROLINA
With George Raft and Joan Ben
nett sharing stellar honors and a
strong supporting cast featuring
Walter Pidgeon, Gladys George,
Lloyd Nolan and June Knight,
Walter Wanger’s “The House
Across the Bay” will have its ini
tial showing at the Carolina the
atre today through Wednesday.
The new film production is based
on an original story by Myles Con
nolly, and the central figure in
the picture is Brenda Bentley,
played by Miss Bennett, a young
girl confronted with the problem
of adjusting her life to a strange
fate when her husband is sent tc
prison for income tax evasion.
This role, which is outstandinglj
dramatic, gives the alluring Mis;
Bennett wide scope as she is seen
as a singer and dancer in addition
to her dramatic opportunities. In
one sequence of the film she signs
and dances “Chula Chihuahua,”
her own interpretation of the South
American rhumba, and later in
troduces "I’ll Be a Fool Again.”
“The House Across the Bay”
was directed by Archie Mayo, anc
Sammy Lee acted as dance direc
tor. Its story revolves around the
women who are left behind to bat
tle their own odds and to retain
their faith and balance, while thein
husbands are serving terms be
hind prison bars. Miss Bennett,
impersonating Brenda Bentley,
therefore presents a composite
picture of a whole group of wom
en who wait for that dim tomor
row when at last their husbands
will be free and thus set them
free, too.
News of the Day, a color car
toon and Fitzpatrick Traveltalk,
will complete the program. 1
“WE WHO ARE tOUJNU
IS OFFERED AT ROYAL
Introducing the screen’s newest
romantic team, Lana Turner and
John Shelton, “We Who Are
Young” opens today at the Royal
theatre for an engagement of two
days.
The film marks the first straight
dramatic role for Lana Turner, as
the young wife, and is a distinct
departure from her collegiate and
glamour girl roles of the past.
John Shelton gets his most impor
tant assignment to date as the
youthful husband. Shelton, a com
parative newcomer to the screen,
will be remembered for his work
as the juvenile lead in “The Ghost
Comes Home.”
The supporting cast is headed
by Gene Lockhart as the employer
who takes such pride in his posi
tion that he forgets to temper
judgment with the human element,
Grant Mitchell and Henry Armet
ta.
Royal varieties presents Donald
Duck, a scenic novelty called
“Birthplace of an Iceberg,” arid
Movietone News. 1
“DRUMS ALONG MOHAWK”
IS FEATURED AT BIJOU
When Walter D. Edmonds, who
was raised in the traditions of
New York State’s beautiful Mo
hawk Valley, wrote his biggest ot
best-sellers, “Drums Along the
Mohawk,” it was immediately rec
ognized by Darryl P. Zanuck as
one of the finest screen possibil
ities he had ever encountered. Ac
cordingly the book was purchased
by 20th Century-Pox who proceed
ed to give it top importance on the
schedule. The picture Is playing
at the Bijou today.
The first big job facing the com
pany was to find somewhere in
the west a locale like the Mohawk
Valley. Three hundred studio
workers, including 70 members of
the cast, had to be transported to
the Wasatch Range in Utah where,
at an elevation of 11,000 feet, a
perfect “Mohawk Valley” was
found. The immense task of hous
ing and feeding this population of
300, in addition to building sets
and producing a Technicolor film
of major importance, was a feat
that amazed even Hollywood.
Latest News events complete the
program. 1
1ODAY is in your hands—
you control it through your
earnings, skill and health as
nearly as it is humanly pos
sible. Today is certain—but
why gamble on tomorrow?
Unless there is a guarantee
of protection for your family
and savings for yourself, the
future is a gamble. With the
Jefferson Standard Invest
ment Protection Plan you
can face the future with as
surance. Write or ’phone us
today for details of this Plan.
W. L. CALLUM, JR., Mgr.
W. G. ROBERTSON, JR.
SAMUEL H. PORTER
Special Agents
511 Murchison Bldg.
Wilmington, N. C.
' *
SH VOOD URGES
AID FOR BRITAIN
Says ‘Misguided Isolation
ists’ Do Not Reflect True
Feelings Of Americans
NEW YORK, Aug. 25.— (^—De
claring that “misguided isolation
ists’ do not reflect the true feel
ing of the American people, Rob
ert E. Sherwood, American play
wright, urged today that the Unit
ed States give increased “construc
tive help” to Canada and Britain
in their war against Germany.
Sherwood, who spoke over the
national network of the Canadian
Broadcasting Corporation, acclaim
ed recent establishment of a joint
defense foard by Canada and the
United States as a step in the
rieht direction.
The vast majority of Americans,
said Sherwood, believe that the fu
ture of their free institutions are
at stake in the Battle of Britain.
The playwright refered to Hen
ry Ford and Charles A. Lindbergh
as typical of “misguided isolation
ists who think that the Atlantic
and Pacific oceans are still just
as broad as in the days of sailing
vessels,” and continued:
“We wish to tell the world that
the voice of our country is not
expressed by Lindbergh. . , .
“The voice of our country is ex
pressed truly and eloquently by
President Roosevelt and by the
other great American political
leader, the Republican candidate
for the presidency, Wendell Will
kie.”
Sherwood, who fought overseas
with the Canadian infantry in the
World war was the author of the
full-page “Stop Hitler Now” ad
vertisement which appeared
recently in many American news
papers and was subsequently en
dorsed by President Roosevelt. 2
Germans Ask French Not
To Issue ‘False Reports’
BERLIN, Aug. 25.—(AP Via Ra
dio)—The German government
has asked the Vichy government
to desist from issuing “false re
ports,” the official radio broad
cast today, referring to a recent
communique of the French air
ministry which said that up to
June 10 the French lost 306 planes
to the Germans 982.
“These figures are declared by
competent German quarters to be
faked,” the radio said. 1
• LEADING
BATTERS
(By The Associated Press)
BATTING
(Three Leaders in Each League)
Player, Club G Ab R H Pet.
Radcliff, Browns 110 458 65 162 .354
Appling, W. Sox 114 420 68 140 .347
Williams. R. Sox 112 431 107 140 .346
Rowell. Bees ___ 07 348 38 114 .328
Mize. Cardinals 116 433 00 140 .323
Walker, Dodgers 110 420 58 135 .321
HOME RUNS
American League
Foxx. Red Sox _34
DiMaggio. Yanks _27
York, Tigers _24
Greenberg, Tigers _24
National League
Mize, Cardinals _37
Rizzo. Phillies _21
Nicholson. Cubs _20
RUNS BATTED IN
American League
Greenberg, Tigers _108
DiMaggio, Yankees _104
Foxx. Red Sox _102
National League
Mize. Cardinals _100
F. McCormick. Reds_100
Fletcher, Pirates _84
Macdonald Says Three Men Could
Paralyze Alaskan DefensSet-i,
SAN FRANCSCO, Aug. 25.—UP)
—Three men with a fishing boat,
operating on a dark night, could
paralyze the United States .Alas
kan defense machine in less than
an hour, in the opinion of Donald
MacDoald, Alaska highway com
mission engineer.
MacDonald, en route home from
Washington where he conferred
with military leaders, said in an
interview that within 90 days after
the three men had done their work
the Alaskan population would be
facing starvation.
The most vulnerable point, he
said, is Seward, the territory’s
only all-weather entrance.
“The little town of 4,000 would
be asleep and the first intimation
of invasion would be a series of
explosions. one ,
tanks near the only «■
ka s entire gas and oil s ' A:*
there, with no reserve an PP[y »
‘ The next would be
itseit. Then, as the starUeV^1
lation tried to give cJ! ed PcP«
would mi
destroyed and the whnu keti
wouM be as dangerous a°!
field, owing to the hidden e
for which the Alaskan c ’ee!s
famous. uSt u
The only answer ATnniv •
to the Alaskan defense Jrobfe
construction of a road !
railhead at Hazel,on B? *=*
Fairbanks, curving through"’n
Yukon territory." Such a h?'
way, he added, would be v'- "
immune from offshore attach’
HOME LOANS
are not simply made for a day, month nr •
but for longer terms. The point you shouM ?r
termine with your home loan is whether e, T'.
it will be satisfactory for you throughout the years. CAROLINA’
new plan is most appealing. Get the facts—it pays:
Two
The / Million Dollar
“Member Federal Home Lean Banli”
C. M. BUTLER \V. A. FONVIELLE w. D ,J0\F«
President Sec.-Treas. Asst. Sec.-Treas
ROGER MOORE. Vice-Pres. J, o. CARR, .\ny
Itaubman’sI
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NEW 1941 STYLED I
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INSTALLED FREE! I
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^- -/
NOTICE TO WATER
CONSUMERS
Accounts EAST of THIRTEENTH STREET
which were due July 1st are now PAST DUE. The
Cut-Off List is being prepared. Pay now and avoid
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WATER DEPARTMENT
— ....
FOR SALE
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Ideally located. Commanding View. Spacious,
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care of Star-News Box “G”.
1^—*
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In Yjjur
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120 S. 17th St. Dial 7751
Ladies' Heel Taps (Cash and Carry).—_15c
Children's Half Soles and Heels _90c
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