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The Wilmington morning star. [volume] (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, October 03, 1940, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1940-10-03/ed-1/seq-8/

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CHAPTER THIRTY-NINE
Sue Ackerman stood at the en
trance to Linda’s apar ent. In
one hand she carried a traveling
bag. It was a bag that once had
been good, but the years had sub
dued its gloss, had worn the edges
away, and creased the leather.
“May I come in?” Miss \cker
man asked, and Linda opened the
door, eyeing her visitor in wonder
ment. “Are you alone?”
Linda nodded again, and pulled
the chains in the round lamp on
the low reading table, in the lamps
on the desk and by the divan.
“Is there another room besdies
the kitchenette to this place?” Miss
Ackerman asked.
“Only the bathroom,” Linda an
swered, puzzled. Was the woman
moving in with her? Was she pen
niless and did she think that this
girl whom the police believed was
the planned target for the assis
sin’s bullet, should’take care of
her?
Quickly Linda planned to sum
mon Robert. He would know what
to do. He always knew what to do.
Miss Ackerman did not give Lin
da a chance to run up the stairs
to Robert’s rooms. Later that eve
ning Linda was to know that it
would not have helped 'f she had.
Robert would not have be there.
The unexpected visitor said,
“May I call the police? And I
would like to have Mr. Stafford,
Miss Markley, Mr. Bagley and the
district attorney or someone from
his office here, too, please.”
Linda gazed at the woman in
astonishment. “You mean to have
them come here?”
“Yes, if you don’t mind.”
“Wouldn’t it be better to go to po
lice headquarters?”
The woman shook her head. “No,
I want to stay here. Grant me this,
won’t you?”
So, in the end, the people were
assembled. The police sent some
men and a young assistant from
the district attorney’s office came,
too.
“May I ask Robert Barton.'
Linda said, while they were wait
ing.
“Barton? Oh, you mean the man
who came out with you? The one
that Mina imagined she loved? The
one back of everything!”
"Back of everything? He never
cared for Mina and it was such
a foolish notion she had, too. But
you knew her well. I’m sorry I
talked about her. But may I ask
him to come down?”
“If you like.”
“I’ll be back in a minute.” Linda
rang the bell at Robert’s door and
then knocked with slim knuckles
against the heavy oak curface. But
there was no answer. Just the re
verberations of sound that echoed
in an empty apartment.
“She came back to her own
apartment to wait the coming of
the people.
Sue Ackerman was not nervous.
She sat quietly in a soft, deep
chair. She lighted one cigaret after
the other, smoking a little, throw
ing the cigaret away.
The members of the police de
partment came first. They asked
Miss Ackerman if she had an an
nouncement to make, but she only
shook her head. “Not yet,” she
said.
When Ronald came with Sarah,
Linda noted the deeply s h i nin g
light in the girl’s eyes. There was
serenity in them, too, tonight, in
stead of a restless eagerness. Ah,
love could do many things when it
came happily. For a fraction of a
second, so brief that it almost did
not happen, Linda felt an old nos
talgia for moments that were gone
forever.
Then she was shaking hands with
Sarah and Ronald, bidding them
welcome, seating them together
on the long divan, for they belong
ed together now.
She heard steps on the stair
way and listened. They sounded as
though they were made from Rob
ert’s long stride, so she went to
the door on a pretense and looked
cat. It was not Robert. Some new
tenant w'ent up the stairs.
When the group had assembled
Sue Ackerman tossed the butt of
her cigaret into a blue ash tray
and addressed the young assistant
to the prosecutor.
“You are thinking it is most un
usual for me to be asking you to
come here tonight, aren’t you? I
think it i: rather -pieer, too. But
it’s a long trek to the Bronx and
anyway, I haven’t been staying in
that apartment these last nights.
I don’t think it’s quite safe.’’
Her eyes met the official’s
squarely.
“Not safe? Who would want
you?” he asked.
“The same person who got Clar
abell.”
Everyone in the room came to
sudden attention. ‘Then you know
who killed your sister?” the dis
trict attorney’s man ask' \
“I don’t know a thing, but I
have an idea. It’s pure!" theoreti
cal, but I’m giving it to you for
what it is worth.”
Linda and Ronald looked at eac’i
other. Their eyes were acknowledg
ing the same thing- that whoever
fired the shots had wanted Linda,
not Clarabell.
Sarah spoke into the amazed pool
o fsilence that followed Sue Acker
man’s words. ‘Then that lets me
and my gun out, doesn’t it?”
“It lets you. out-1 think it
does. Maybe not entirely,” the wo
man answered. ‘But the gun, no.
Most decidedly not!”
“We’ve found the gun,” the pros
ecutor said simply then.
•Found it?’ a chorus of voices
echoed. “Where?”
In a refuse can on the corner.
We had all refuse checked and it
came in on a consignment from
that district—from that immediate
neighborhood.
“Were there fingerprints on it?’
Sarah asked, her voice so low and
throaty it scarcely carried.
“Yours, we think. Miss Markley.
We want the Bertillon department
to take yours tonight. But t ha t
doesn t mean a xnrng. auc* |
the gun was yours and you prob
ably had lifted it a t hous a nd
times.”
“But why did you have a gun,
Miss Markley?” Sue Ackerman fi
nally asked.
Sarah flushed a little and her
hand found its way into Ronald’s.
“My father thought I needed one,
and got me a permit. Sometimes I
go west and ride horses and we
used to have target practice down
on the Long Island place. I didn’t
go around shooting up people, hon
estly!”
“But it was unfortunate that you
had a gun which others could use
for that reason,” the woman An
swered. "Just to whom did you
lend it on the house party? To
whom—and why, my dear?”
(o Be Continued)
Federal Agents Make
dlaids On Two Stills
September 30 netted federal au
thorities a good haul in stills and
liquor with the seizure of two
stills and about 1,600 gallons of
mash. John Ludd and John Mcln
tire were arrested at the old fer
ry landing at Castle Haynes when
authorities found 54 gallons of
whiskey.
The two defendants were held un
der bond of $300 each.
In connection with the same
case, the authorities joined Depu
ty Sheriff Croom, of Pender coun
ty, to continue about one-fourth
mile further above the ferry land
ing on the Northeast river, and
seized a 200-gallon still, 1,100 gal
lons of mash, and two and a half
gallons of whiskey.
The authorities also seized a 200
gallon still and 500 gallons of mash
in the Rosehill vicinity. The lat
ter seizure was related to the ar
rest of Leroy Harper and Leroy
Davis on September 26 when 54
gallons of whiskey and an out
board motor were seized.
-'ll. ■ ■ . -I
THIS CURIOUS WORLD , ™nm
I TOADS ^FROGS
ARE DIRECT, MINIATURE
DESCENDANTS OF= P/CS
SS/STOttC XW//HAA. A./AS7.
-1
COPR. 1940 BY NEA SERVICE. INC./
ONCE WAS USED
FOR ALL.
/=A/?AA
L/VE S7&C/C.
1 Famous Crossincss/
Washington crossed_<N
BURBANK " [
LINDBERGH " I ,
/LORD BVRON « -J \
ANSWER: Washington crossed the Delaware, Burbank crossed plants,
Lindbergh crossed the Atlantic, and Lord Byron crossed the Bosphorus,
or Hellespont.
BELA LAN AN—COURT REPORTER By L. Allen Heine
Founded On Actual Court Records And You Can Be The Judge
r ——I 11 ^ ‘ _ - - - -..=■— "•-*--= ---~
The
Strange
Case of
BtOOD
AND
mm

IN SIX
EPISODES
No. 4
-— -
(t: M. Fee u. S. Pat. Off —World rights
_ rescrvtd by Carlile Crutcher ) .>
OUT OUR WAY By J. R. Williams
f YOU SHOULDM'T \
PILE UP LIKE THAT- ]
WHEM VOU TACKLE I
A RUMMER- SO /
. NAAMY PLAYERS \
> PILED OM A <3LSY \
V IS UMMECESSARY/y
f THERE’S OHLY
/ TWO PLAYERS—
TH' REST a THAT
IS OUR. FOOTBALL!
) WE GOT A TRUCK
/ TUBE IM IT AM' 1
[ OUESS WE
\ PUMPED IT UP
[ TOO MUCH AM
V IT’S BUSTED
X OUT/ . =
OUR BOARDING HOUSE . . with . . . Major Hoopie
[MARTHA, MS DEAR, 1 AM EXPECTING %
\AN IMPORTANT LETTER FROM A BIG S3
CATTLEMAN IN FORT WORTH,ENCLOSING
A CHECK OR MONEN ORDER/ EGAD, IT
[ SHOULD HAVE BEEN HERE DASS AGO/
lvm/HAIC-KAPP/—1'VERS ANNOSING ^
THAT IT HASN'T ARRIVED/— UM-M
i INCIDENT ALLS, I HAVE AN IDEA/
' I KNOW.' IP I COME TO THE RESCUE p
^WlTH ABOUT PIVE DOLLARS NDU'LLPa~jl
| MB BACK WHEN THE LETTER ARRIVES*
| —A PORT WORTH CATTLEMAN .<
| INDEED/ I SUPPOSE VOU SOLD HIM ;
f A NEVJ INVENTION TOR BRANDING J ’
i calves without catching them/^u
1i KNOW-ALL the ANSWERS, AMOS j.
: ||P * y HOOPLE, AND THEN I
Up ADD UP TO ONE TWC
letter word/ r
.. - rtm—rr.—
WILLIAMS,
INSIDE OUT eoflt1>,0,YWBtM|,tlcc |NC. TiM,Mt,.u.t.nr.oFf. ;/Q~Z ^
IJTTLE ORPHAN ANNIE _ I he Road Back
X NO- t DON’T THINK 1
I LITTLE BILLY WILL BOTHER !
I HER-HE'S VERY QUIET—
I SHE SEEMS QUITE FOND OF
HIM-GIVES HER AN INTEREST
MAY EVEN SPEED HER
I RECOVERY. IN FACT- y-<
■-If
GAINING STRCNGlJ
FAST. ISNiT SHE. J
DOCTOR?^
YES, INDEED - J
NOTHING WRONG |
. WITH HER NOW
THAT FOOD AND ;
REST WONT CURE- -
LET HER GET UP
BEFORE LONG
T
_
TIME FOR
LUNCH.
PEGGY- HOPE
YOU LIKE THIS
SOUP-ANO THERE
ARE CHOPS AND
gracious! a if
BANQUET--BUT fl I
I'M ASHAMED OF 1 I
MY APPETITE- m S
, I’M EATING YOU U \
\ OUT OF HOUSE 1 P
J AND HOME- § «
nonsense! guess
WE CAN MANAGE—
ANYWAY, SINCE
SAM CAME TO
BOARD WITH US
ferr \\ :£
rSAM--yes
1*0 LIKE TO
TALK TO
you ABOUT
NT"
\m amrt-v i —^—■ *■ ■ * 11 “ — ■ ■■ ■ ■■
________ __ Beauty And The Beast By Roy Crane
_. . - .iiiii.wit -i "•... . *v .———:——\
LET <30 OP ME !
HELP, SOWtBODWy
~—■-— ■ ... r
( WOW LISTEN, T
\ 6IELIE — 1
WOLD ON,
FOWLER
AREVST YOU BEING RATHER
OBNOXIOUS TO THE LAPY?^,
YOU KEEP
OUTA MY
AFFAIRS!
IF I CAN BE Or ANY CAW NEVES THANK.
FURTHER ASSISTANCEJ YOU, AS IT IS. BUT
MISS -fS PLE ASE — I'VE JUST
^_) l COME TO TOWN-lM
Y ^ \ TRYING TO FIWD THE
\ ELITE BEAUTY
PARLOR ^
^-7 __■■■'
GASOLINE ALLEY Hind Sight
THEN THEIR INTEREST, THAT'S
A CINCH.' IVE COT A 1INE OF
CHATTER THEY CAN'T IGNORE, ,
‘ , INCLUPING A STRING OF u
SNAPPY GACS^JJ
DESlBE TO BIN NEXT, AN' ]
THEN THE FINAL WALLOP AN' /
THE NAME ON THE DOTTED f
LINE. ITSAPJSH^VERT^
OOLLY, I WISH IV LEARNED ALL ABOUT
SELLING BEFORE I MADE THAT LAST TOUCH ON 1
SKEE7IY. I COULD JUST AS WELL HAVE /
^ HAD FIVE BUCKS AS THREE.’ _^1
THE GlIMPS__ _ Two Points Of View
Sr IF OuD-TIMER AMD 'I
I Fits WIFE DON’T <30 K
I HOME SOOH BE I
| FORCED INTO BAMtC
I RUPTCY-ThAT Pair /
a ARE my Candidates /
i\ FOR The EATiNfo /
s\ ChAMPiOMSHIP /
\OFTHE \WORi_D- /
\MEuu-thEy I
1 are your
FRIENt>S,
V NOT NMNE 7
/ it would be cheaper \
7 TO HAVE THE RAILROAD ]
I Rum a sidetrack imto
l THE BACKYARD, SO WE
L CAM ORDER EVERYTHING
T|jKlK^CARLCAD
f \
I Al_U RlCaHT, ANDY/
STOP <3f?OUS.INt>
YOU'RE ON NO
DIET YOURSEUF
i I' VE NEVER HAD To
l caul out the
\ NMLITi A TO CaET )
VYOU TO THE /
—J
HM-YOU'RE RlfaHT, \
RAW - CITY FOLKS » \
. MICE EMOUCiW.BUT !
\TVlEY EAT SO PUNV-;
I'M OETYIMO SORT \
OF HOMESICK/ /VAA'W —
vge ouowt to at
PACKING UP PRETTY
S.OON AMO HEAOIMOj
HOME To A
\souaremeal -J
BRICK BRADFORD—Seeks the Diamond Doll By William Ritt and Clarence Gray
I IT’S THE TREASURE
bn chest } ^
I FOUND THE ^
TREASURE, BOSS/ 1
BUT IT'S IN A STONE
CHEST-1 CAN'T r
UFT THE LID / jL
STAY THERE UNTIL WE
FIND SOMETHING TO
PRY UPTHE LID '

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