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The Wilmington morning star. (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, October 07, 1940, Image 8

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1940-10-07/ed-1/seq-8/

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CHAPTER FORTY-TWO
Linda Avery didn’t faint in the ■
crowded room where she waited
with so many witnesses while Mina
Nevins and Sue Ackerman were 1
questioned. By sheer will power '
she pulled herself back from the ■
pit in which she was sinking.
Robert continued his long dis J
tance conversation to California, _
talking in that low tone which a
man uses when there are others
near, and his words are intended J
for one girl only.
He did not come near Linda as j
the testimony went on, and he ex
cused himself early. She watched
him go, wanting to run after him,
not daring to.
Much could have happened in
these last few hours. Undoubtedly
he had pledged his troth to Billie
Anne. Oh, life’s timing sometimes
was so very bad! If only, before
Rob had old her he loved her, she
had realized that she did not love
Ronald, but Rob himself, she would J
not be suffering tonight.
Through the window of the room
she saw the moon, high and white j
and small tonight. Life went on,
forever and forever. And she must '
walk with it. I
But surely, surely, there would
be a way to tell Robert what she
wanted him to know. Only dimly
she realized that other members
of the prosecutor’s office had ar
rived and that Mina Nevins was
being questioned and cross-ques
tiQned.
Mina’s voice recalled her to the
scene. “Yes,” she said in full, rich
tones, “I fired the shots. I bor
rowed the gun from Miss Rfarkley.
Well, not exactly 1 orrowed it. I
did it without her consent. You
found it, I see. I’m glad, because
it was an expensive affair. And
now, wouldn’t you like my fin
gerprints?”
one neia uui xxex wmtc uauuc,
and the emeralds gleamed with
mad lights in the dingy room.
There was something of rever
ence in the way the officials looked :
at Minda, Linda noted. They were
remembering her for scenes in
other years. They were letting
strong wind blow back the waters
and watching her in c'.d and gal
lant roles. Because she had con
tributed much of beauty once upon
a time they could find it in their
hearts to be gentle now.
“After all, she is mentally sick,
or none of this would have hap
pened,” someone murmured, and
Linda nodded in mute agreement.
She reminded herself that if
Hina had not held a hopeless in
fatuation for Rob she would not
have followed him so relentlessly
that he had sought refuge in her
apartment one night in spring. Mi
na had brought Rob to her.
And now he was gone. The room
tilted again, just a little, but she
clutched the arms of her chair and ]
did not move.
She wondered where Rob had
gone when he had excused him
self. Then some words of the
state caught her attention. “Miss
Nevins, haven’t you been seen in
the company lately of a Mr. Terry
Adams? That doesn’t coincide with
your professed attachment to an
other.
Mina laughed lightly. “Terry?
He’s a sweet nit-wit! I never want
ed him. He was a tool—only it
didn’t work. But, please, let’s get
on with those prints.”
They took Mina away then, and
Linda watched, half sobbing. No,
Terry hadn’t worked as a tool. But
Mina had tried to marry him when
she felt tha web closing in on her.
She had been afraid that she would
be caught on Terry’s wedding
night.
“Why did you decide to turn
state’s evidence, Miss Ackerman?”
the tones of the chief prosecutor
asked behind Mina’s retreating
form. “You didn’t come as soon as
you sensed that there might have
been a masquerade on hand that
night. Therefore, it wrsn’t the fact
that Miss Nevins shot your sister
that brought you. What did,
then?”
Sue Ackerman’s eyes were old
tnd tired and defeated. “I might
lave come when I discovered that
unwittingly had helped Mina kill
llarabell. I might have — but I
iidn’t. For this is a hard world
md Mina had promised to pay me
veil for that night. She had been
jetting radio money. Then she
velched. She wouldn’t give me
mything. And—I came.”
Linda looked at the woman in
lorror. Could life become so cheer
ess and dreadful that a woman
:ould forget honor, decency, kind
iness? Had Sue ever been young
ind eager and hopeful?
She must not think of that now.
>he must go hpme. And she must
;o straight to Robert’s apartment
ind tell him that she was wiser
low. ghe must forget her pride,
f he had made a vow to Billie
bnne that he could not break, she
:ould raise her head higher, catch
i bugle on the wind and walk on.
Jut first she must know.
“May we run you down to your
louse?” Ronald was asking her,
md she nodded. A subway would
ie stuffy on this summer night and
ihe had spent so much money on
axicabs and clothes lately that her
lank balance was close to the zero
nark.
In the car Sarah said, "Linda,
.•ou noticed my handkerchief,
iidn’t you? And you noticed it was
ike the one on exhibit in the case?
rhe brand really is mine. Mina
nust have helped herself. But I
iidn’t mention the matter because
here are hundreds and thousands
if people in town who use the
;ame kind. Does that clear up
iverything? Once again, I beg
lour pardon.”
Linda knew that she said some
hing. She never knew what. Here
;he sat in Ronnie’s roadster, not as
lis girl, but as the third member
if the group. And she was happy.
She wanted it to be this way. She
lelt gayer and freer than she had
since that rainy evening when Ron
lie had crossed a long room to her
at a tea and presently said, “I've
ost my girl!” and not meant her.
He spoke more truthfully than

he knew. Maybe presently all
crooked paths were straightened.
Maybe, if you could look at life
from a great road map up above
you, you would understand the by
paths and the turnings. Perhaps
there was a reason that Robert
had begged to enter her apartment.
With the mere thought of his
name her heart began to sing and
she wanted the car to go faster,
faster, faster. A red-light stopped
it, though, then another, and an
other.
But they came at last to the
door of the old red l rick house
where she lived and Sarah said:
“We may not see you again,
Linda. Ronnie and I'are being mar
ried in a day or two and are taking
a day or two and are taking a
Caribbean cruise before the show
goes on tour.” She held out her
hand, and the selfish, willful lines
were gone from her face or else
the night softened them. “I hope
you get whatever, whomever you
want.”
RTmnie held her hand a minute
when he said goodby, and she felt
an odd choking. This was more i
than a farewell to Ronnie. She was
bidding adieu to years of growing
up, years of waiting and wishing
and hoping.
That was over now. Ended. Just
as though someone had put a pe
riod after it.
She began to hear that low song
in her heart as she started toward
the door. She was surprised to find
the janitor still on duty.
“Been giving Mr. Barton’s trunks
and things to the expressman,” he
said.
"Mr. Barton’s trunks?” Linda
repeated.
“Sure! He left an hour ago, but
hi* stuff is following him. Lost a
good tenant.” 1
(To Be Continued)
CONVENTION SLATED
CHARLOTTE, Oct. 6—UP)— The
North Carolina Cotton Manufac
turers association will hold its 34th
annual convention at Pinehurst
November 7-8.
" 1 1
THIS CURIOUS WORLD VJS2ST
■ — — . . ■ i i ■■ ■! ■■ ■
/A IN
EXPERT,
BV STUDY
ING THE
SCALES OF A
SALMON,
CAN TELL. THE
y4G^£T OF THE
FISH, WHEN
IT WENT TO /
3VSA, AND S
WHETHER OR &
NOT IT HAS 'r
v. ‘
A 70 - TOM
GREENLAND
WHALE
MAS ABOUT
30 TONIS
'^Owo COWS AMD TWO 4
HORSES HAVE A TOTAL. I
OF HOW MANY CT%
to/via ones' *r v
/O'5
i
ANSWER: Ten. Each cow has four, and each horse one.
BELA LANAN—COURT REPORTER By L. Allen Heine
bounded On Actual Court Records And You Can Be The Judge
r
The
Strange
Case
Entitled
TWKE
SIXTEEN
B
32

I IN SW
EPISODES
"-1 J
W m2, DOWN IN SOuYH CAROLINA...
AUSTIN BAIRD, A WELL-TO-DO FARMER,
AWOKE ONE NIGHT, ABOUT ONE O'CLOCK
AND..
OM! AND I LOCKED
-THAT DOO*» JU
OUT OUR WAY By J. R. Williams
/ 7 SUGAR MUST HAVE A \
( BOTTLE AROUND—HE /
\ SAID HE WAS GOING TO H
/ KNOCK OFF AN ANTELOPE
FOR A CHANGE OF DtETJ
1 AND LOOK WHERE HE'S
V GOING-THERE GO THE . /
^ANTELOPE//
/ thet's th' trouble with \ ^
BREAKIN’ TH’ LAW, WES— /
WATCHIN' FER TH GAME 4
WARDEN IS SECH A VITAL \
FACTOR THET HE’S FERGOT \
TH' GAME AND IS HUNTIN'
> GAME WARDENS—X /
' BELIEVE HE’D SHOOT ONE /
i IF HE COULD FIND ANV/ /
' unT> MEAT CTf?.WILUAM5,.'._
T. M. R6s.tTir PAT. OFF. HOT MEA J /£- 5
JOOPR. 1»40 BY NEA SERVICE. INC. - - - i ^
OUR BOARDING HOUSE . . with . . . Major Hoopl<
' ■ j j i i . . j — ; T . ... ' —-1
THOUT catching them/ £
- WHISTLE '•“■"'SOMETHING *
E RANCHING INDUSTRY IS
DR_,EGAD/""“Z Z-GLOP '
5. PEAR WHISTL £
MILL FIND A WAV/'
/-N'v/,
^ 'UttUj (V\DIMh Dt l \ tK. ;
f DRV UP THAT SNORIN’ AN' ROUSE
k VO'SE’F —' MIX HOOPLE SAV SHE
§ CALL VOU FO’ TIMES AN1 SHE CftN1'
% STAND THE NOISE NO LONGER.'
V SHE SAV IF VOU AIN'T UP AN' >
QUIET IN FIVE MINUTES, SHE
□ GONNA PARE
YOU LIKE A
niFOTATUH/
/St'S THE SUBCONSCIOUS
. MIND AT WORK, JASON
LITTLE ORPHAN ANNIE __ Lost And Foun<
IF GEE, Wl
| SURE GLAD YOU 1
POUND IT, IP
IT WAS’PORTANT
[ TO YOU, PEG
jfl OH, IT
i IMPORTANT
I TSRR\BLY so
ft BUT IT’S
I REALIT OF NO
MORE VALUE
l NOW
f l KNEW YOU
H WERE LOOKIN' FOR
1 SOMETHIN'. BUT
8 I COULDNT KNOW
| WHOT, O' COURSE
^ HA? HA!
OUST AN OLD
NEWSPAPER
CUPPING
MUST HAVE
BEEN IN THE
BAG ALL THE
TIME
_
f MUST HAVE
\ GOT STUCK DOWN W3
IN ONE OF THOSE V?
UTTLE POCKETS- Vj
THERE ALLTHE TAME- 1
BUT EVERYTHING CAME )
OUT ALL RAGHT. J
( ANYWAY
Iv y
•UH-HUH
OH.SURe
■V___)
I
f DOGGONE rr— l KNEW I
I SAW A CUPRN' IN HER BAG
THAT N\GHT WE FOUND HER—
AND IT WASN’T IN THERE
WHEN t LOOKED LATER ON—
| ’CAUSE I PROWLED THAT BAG GOOD
V THAT SURE \S FUNNV
ISfetlifW I l( P
i HAROLD
\ SRAH •
10-7-40 PI
Rer- U. S. Pot Off..
Copyught, 1940, by New* SjnJieotc Co. bit '
WASH TUBBS Better Not, Easy ___ By Roy Crane
WHO ' WHY. EVERYBODY SAYS SO. THEY SW HE
TOLD YOU \ KILLED A 6-MAN, AMO THAT HE'S ATRAI
THAfl PUMKY \TOR BEIM6 PAID BY 'SOME FOREI6U 60V
F0WLER WASl ERUMEHT TO SABOTAGE THE SHIPYARD
SUSPECTED ^—-7 s -
of
BUT WHY DON'T THE POLICE PUT |
HIM IN JAIL? DOESN'T ANYBODY CAPE
WHAT HAPPENS? HAVEN'T THEY ANY J
( BELIEVE ME. IF I WAS A MAN ID DO SOME
I] THINS? X MAY ANYWAY. HOW DOES A PERSON
so About catchins a spy, easy?
- ^
BUT YOURt AN AMERICAN! YOURe SAAK I. YOURt
tear-^-a—, PATRIOTIC. LISTEN,EASY
W HISMAl 5 WONDER ^ WHY DON’T WE BOTH
P IF X DACE TELL jgkGET THE GOODS ON
||TWS GIRL WHO I ^p^'TBAT
GASOLINE ALLEY s Dissention In The Rank
^VES, MISS SNIPE, I
HAVE DECIDED TO GIVE
WIlMER A TRIAL AS
i;
(
i
_,
BUT, MR. WUMPLE, DON'T
YOU THINK THAT SKEEZIX
DESERVES 1HAT CHANCE?
HE'S INTELLIGENT, LOYAL
AND HAS A GOOD
^PERSONALITY.
W SKEEIK ISN'T THE
f SALESMAN! TVPE. HE IS H
I TOO SETieiMG. WMAT 1
I WE NEED IS A MAN WMO ]
I WILL PUSH HIMSELF— 1
I AND CUP GOODS—_A
^^^•QgWAgP / \
WILMES WILL POSH. ALL. ^
SIGHT. SOT I THINK THAT
IN THE LONG SUN SKEEZIX
WOULD MAKE FRIENDS
WITH OOS PROSPECTIVE ^
CUSTOMERS AND SHOW W
BETTER RESULTS. Jj
THINGS ARE GOING SO TOUCH \
WE'VE GOT TO SHOW/ I
IMMEDIATE RESULTS. I'M M
CONVINCED KILMER CAN DO \/
n BETTER THAN SKEEZIX. J
PI
>
\
\
sfI
THE GUMPS — Night Raid (On The Icebox);
1 _ a! **"H^f ai&aagwgggg; ■ ■mmmmnmiinimminnnmnmimTTnmTTmnTTnm --
/ THIS ISTOO WJCH-Olp\
YOU NOTICE THE WAV \
THOSE HUKAAN BLAST
FURNACES WiELTEP
That iz-pounp roast
I AT PINNER ToNlfciHT? '
\ THEY DIDN'T LEAME
1i\ *AE ENOUCiH To PUT l
I i j^lK.MY EYETOOTH-/
DON’T COMPLAIN TO \
ME-IF IT WASN'T FOR
Your insistence.they
Would wave left
YESTERDAY—AND, BY /
NOW, WOULD BE J
, NOTWINCr BUT AN A
VUNPLEASAMT dM
n-^l\emory— Jm
W ^ SOMETHING'S. ftscrr
i done-the only one ■»
i ENJOYING THEIR VISIT
\ is our Butcher- hm,
| WONDER IF WE COULD
4 MONEY BY BUYING*
r
' DON'T be SUCH AM' '
OPTIMIST—IF A CAT CbOT
LOCKED UP IN THEIR ICE
BOX., HE’D STARVE
Before he’d freeze
BUT C’MON-WE Mlfc>HT AS
WELL TRY-1 CAN'T |
SLEEP WELL ON AN J
v Empty stummick, /
either-_
BRICK BRADFORD—Seeks the Diamond Doll 7 By William Ritt and Clarence Gray
WE MUST TAKE THEM BY SURPRISE -SNEAK F
UP BEHIND - KEEP YOUR GUN HANDY ' -ygM
HERE'S AN AX TO PRY OPEN THE UD OF THE
TREASURE CHEST /

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