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The Wilmington morning star. (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, December 19, 1940, FINAL EDITION, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1940-12-19/ed-1/seq-2/

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MORE N. C. MEN
TO BE DRAFTED
New Hanover Not Included
On Quotas For Next Con
tribution To Army
RALEIGH, Dec. 18.—LT)—State
selective service headquarters an
nounced today the quotas of white
men each local draft board will be
expected to fill for North Carolina s
next contribution to the conscripted
army—2,001 men by January 23.
That number includes 366 negroes,
but the negro quotas have not been
assigned to boards yet.
The next contingent will begin
reporting at Fort Bragg January 6.
North Carolina has already furnish
ed 516 men, and before July 1 is ex
pected to provide 15,613.
The following list shows the dates
on which the men will report, with
quotas by boards:
: January 6: Dare 3, Currituck 3,
Camden 3, Pasquotank 13, Bertie 13
~~total 35.
January 7: Chowan 1, Perquimans
6, Tyrrell 3, Washington 7, Martin
16, Edgecombe (1) 13, Edgecombe
(2) 13, Wilson (1) 7, Wilson (2) 6,
Beaufort (1) 5, Beaufort (2) 4, Pitt
(1) 8, Pitt (2) 9, Hyde 4—total 101.
January 8: Gates 5, Hertford 14,
Northampton 13, Halifax (1) 6,
Halifax (2) 13. Nash (1) 16, Nash
*2) 16, Wake (4) 17—total 100.
January 9: Pamlico 5, Craven 4,
Carteret 12, Jones 5, Lenoir (1) 2,
Lenoir (2) 12, Greene 11, Wayne
<1) 19, Wayne (2) 14, Scotland 13—
total 9i.
January 10: Onslow 11, Duplin
(1) 11, Duplin (2) 12, Sampson (1)
15, Sampson (2) 13, Pender 10, Rich
mond (1) 11, Richmond (2) 11,
Brunswick 9—total 103.
January 13: Columbus (1) 3, Co
lumbus (2) 13, Bladen 14, Robeson
(1) 2, Robeson (2) 5, Cumberland
(1) 11, Cumberland (2) 22, Johnson
<1) 7, Johnson (2) 20—total 97.
January 14: Granville 11, Durham
(1) 14, Durham (2) 10, Durham (3)
15, Harnett (1) 4, Harnett (2) 13,
Wake (1) 15, Wake (2) 11, Wake
(3) 9—total 102.
January 15: Caswell 10, Person 15,
Alamance (1) 14, Alamance (2) 15,
Orange 16, Chatham 14, Moore 17
total 101.
January 16: Rockingham (1) 8,
Rockingham (2) 2, Guilford (1) 2,
Guilford (2) 6, Guilford (3) 9, Guil
ford (4) 8, Guilford (5) 4, Randolph
(1) 15, Randolph (2) 15, Montgom
iry 10, Union (1) 3, Union (2) 3,
Anson 13, Clay 14, Cherokee 13,
Graham 5, Macon 12, Swain 8, Jack
son 15—total 155.
January 17: Buncombe (1) Bun
combe (2) 14, Buncombe (3) 16,
Buncombe (4) 15, Polk 7, Mitchell
11, Yancey 11, Avery 9, Transyl
vania 10, Madison 16, Henderson IS
—total 142.
January 20: Watauga 12, Ashe 13,
Alleghany 5, Caldwell 15, Surry (1)
17, Surry (2) 15, Wilkes (1) 6, Wilkes
(2) 11, Yadkin 13, McDowell 16,
Burke (2) 11, Stanly 19—total 153.
January 21: Rutherford (1) 13,
Rutherford (2) 15, Cleveland (1) 16,
Cleveland (2) 10, Catawba (1) 19,
Catawba. (2) 23, Lincoln 4, Gaston
' (1) 20, Gaston (2) 22, Gaston (3)
13^-total 155.
January 22: Stokes 14, Forsyth
(1) 15, Forsyth (2) 16, Forsyth (3)
14, Forsyth (4) 19, Iredell (1) 7,
Iredell (2) 13, Davidson (1) 20,
Davidson (2) 20, Alexander 8, Davie
9—total 155.
January 23: Mecklenburg (1) 5,
Mecklenburg (2) 16, Mecklenburg
(3) 18, Mecklenburg (4) 18, Meck
lenburg (5) 13, Cabarrus (1) 13,
Cabarrus (2) 19, Rowan (1) 6,
Rowan (2) 12, Rowan (3) 19—total
":139.
HULL URGES SPEED
ON ARMS PROGRAM
(Continued from Page One)
said that this was in complete har
mony with the President’s plan.
On Capitol Hill, Senator Austin of
Vermont, acting minority leader, said
the nations’ “first problem is to pro
duce goods.”
“As Uncle Remus said in his recipe
for rabbit stew: ‘First catch the
rabbit,’ ” Austin remarked.
PACK AH EXTRA
1HRIIL INTO
HR CHRISTMAS
GIFTS...
Gifts, packages and parcels shipped by
super-speed Air Express add an extra
thrill. Direct air-rail connections from
and to this city. National and interna
tional coverage. There is no extra
charge for special pick-up and special
delivery in all cities and principal
towns. It’s economical, too! Colorful
labels free. Phone Railway Express,
Air Express Division, or Western Union
AiyXPRESS
'—
v
Sportsman — sportswoman — *> m
both appreciate this splendid picnic
kit. Makes both self-sufficient for
the day. Complete with thermos
bottles and cup.__
WAR INTERPRETIVE
(Continued from Page One)
ler,' undersecretary for foreign af
fairs, told paliament the revolt
movement was “making progress”
Three is a broad hint in these
developments that the British of
fensive in Africa, which unques
tionable has far exceeded expec
tations, will shift soon from the
Western Desert to the Ea^t African
front. It may have started already
in the resumption of British “of
fensive patroling” in Italian Soma
liland, where a minor Italian base
is reported to have been sacked.
Britain would seem to have more
to gain by shifting her attack in
Africa to the Red Sea-Kenya Colo
ny-Anglo-Egyptian Sudan sectors
than by pressing forward into Lib
ya. Italian forces in East Africa
are thinly spread at best.
British air scouts now report
from Libya that Marshal Graz
iani’s battered army is huddled
back of the Libyan-Egyptian bor
by the pursuing British. If it
headed back to the Derna area as
der which already has been crossed
reported, it means 150 additional
miles of desert for the British to
cross.
A rotroof 1 o T~1 nrno umnlrl in
dicate that Graziani recognizes
that his chances of regaining the
initiative in West Africa without
help from Italy or Germany are
just about nil. He is retreating
behind a potent desert barrier to
escape the danger of complete an
nihilation. Apparently he intends
to sit down on the defense while
his tottering troops .lick their
wounds and while the Axis war
with Britain is being fought out
somewhere else.
The Derna area offers good de
fensive possibilities although it
means surrender of the Italian
main advance base at Tobruk,
half way between Dernr. and the
border. Here are several north
south lateral roads from the coast
affording a 40-mile defensive line
or a series of possible lines. The
Derna position is the best ground
available to the Italians for a
defensive stand, buhvcrked as it
is to the Egyptian border by 150
miles of desert.
For this reason British reports
of a general Italian retreat to
that front are credible. By the
same token, however, so deep a
retreat would mean abandonment
by the Italians of any hope of re
gaining the initiative without help
—now improbable—from home or
from Germany. 5
ROME SAYS ARMY
RESISTING BRITISH
(Continued from Page One)
the British; are still on their feet,
resisting inch by inch, and are far
from beaten.
II Popolo Di Roma marked the
tenth day of the British offensive
with the declaration that Italian
artillery and aviation had littered
the vast desert battle-field with
wrecks of "dozens” of British
tanks and armored cars.
The high command, reporting
yesterday’s operations, saw the
British forces as already "worn
down” and weakened by losses,
and said they had slowed down
their pressure.
A communique admitted that
Colonel Amaru, who flew the At
lantic twice with the late Italo Bal
bo, was lost in air fighting Mon
day.
However, the high command
said that a 6.000-ton British cruiser
torpedoed off Bardia Monday had
been seen sinking.
ARMY’S WORST SEASON
WEST POINT—Army suffered
the worst football season in its
history in 1940. The Cadets won
only from Williams in their open
er, and then by no more than 20
19.
Trees which have been weakened
by drouth fall easy prey to borers. I
First aids to beauty, are the f
cloisonne type dresser set. above, t
shown vvith a complete manicure kit J
in a slide fastened leather case. *
LOGAN-WALTER BILL
KILLED BY F. D. R.
(Continued from Page One)
The Logan-Walter bill would
have required administrative agen
cies (labor board, veterans ad
ministration, securities com
mission, etc.) to publish their regu
lations in the federal register after
hearings and would have permitted
anybody “substantially interested”
to demand reconsideration, or ap
peal to the courts. Final decisions
of the agencies could be set aside
if found to be based on “erroneous
fingings of facts.” The bill also
was designed, its sponsors said,
to establish uniform procedure
among the agencies.
Mr. Roosevelt sent to the house
with his veto message an analysis
by Attorney General Jackson
u +Ho Hi 11 ’ c “pffppt
on defense activities wherever they
are subject to it would be an in
creased delay and uncertainty."
The President himself said that
it would “produce the utmost chaos
and paralysis in the administration
of the government at this critical
time” and would be “an invitation
to endless and innumerable con
troversies.”
“Quite apart from the general
philosophy of this bill, its unin
tentional inclusion of defense func
tions would require my disapprov
al at this time,” Mr. Roosevelt
wrote, but he condemned its phil
osophy as well.
“The administrative tribunal or
agency has been evolved in order
to handle controversies arising un
der particular statutes,” his mes
sage said. “It is characteristic of
these tribunals that simple and
non-technical hearings take the
place of court trials, and informal
proceedings supersede rigid and
formal pleadings and processes.
"A common-sense resort to usual
and practical sources of informa
tion takes the place of Archaic
and technical appliation of rules
of evidence, and an informed and
expert tribunal renders its deci
sions with an eye that looks for
ward to results rather than back
wards to precedent and to the
leading case.
“Substantial justice remains a
higher aim for our civilization than
technical legalism.”
“The bill that is now before
me,” the President continued, "is
one of the repeated efforts by a
combination of lawyers who desire i
to have all processes of govern- 1
ment conducted through lawsuits ]
and of interests which desire to ■
escape regulation.”
In the debate which followed, *
Walter declared that the veto mes
sage was written by “someone who 1
didn’t understand the measure.” '
_ e
N. C. SPLITS
WASHINGTON. Dec. 18.—UP)— t
With two of its members not vot
ing, the 11-man all-democratic r
North Carolina house delegation ,
split today on a proposal to over- i
ride President Roosevelt's veto of c
the Logan-Walter bill.
Listed as voting to over - ride
were Reps. Barden, Clark, Cooley
and Kerr.
Among those voting to sustain
the veto were: Reps. Bonner, Bul
winkle, Burgin, Durham and Weav
er.
Reps. Daughton and Kolger were
unrecorded. 5
Early American Indians of the
southwest designed pottery after va
rious forms of the squash.
^0PYRIGHT1939rNATI0NA^I$T1U?R^R0DUCT^0R^^Y!crj
• ____ ' ?
IE
1 : |
i!' |
i |
V W>rh~yi ryimMM - -*- - - - _ _
* OLD SPICE ' M |
\ BATH SALTS $1,00 1
\ In Salt Cellar With Scoop |
| HOUBIGANT * I
| TOILET WATER $|.00 f
g Informal Fragrances |
£ £» vu
| Lentheric
! TOILET !
I WATER 1
i With Atomizer Attached |
j Convenient for Travel s
£ *5
t i
i ■
l . 5
Dorothy Gray |
BATH SETS i
I 1
Cologne, Dusting Powder | >
and Soap | i
$2.00-$4.50 i;
$6.00-$8.00 |;
I Peggy Sage | j
MANICURE KITS $1 to $7.50 )j
j For Traveling or Home Use | {
| Cara Nome Single Double Triple S j
Compacts....$1.00 $1.50 $2.75 11
> '• Si
The color of the “Treasure” in my window is White jS ■■
1 The first letter of the name of my "Treasure” is D ;■» l
Basketball thrills will De ei,eu
he year ’round through this Ot'fi
ial Basketball Game which permits
lifferent play-by-play skill every
iine! _
oATEST DIRT
»N STRAWBERRIES
BATON ROUGE, La. OP) — The
atest "inside dope’’ on strawberries
times from Louisiana where state
xperiment station workers found
hat a little soil left on a plant’s
oots bring real dividends in in
reased berry yields.
Horticulturist W. F. Wilson, Jr.,
eported that plants set in this man
ter produce 299 crates of berries an
ere whereas plants shaken clean
if soil yield only 202 crates.
to. to- too- too- too-too- to- too. too. too. to,, to,.
BRITAIN SUMMONS
HOME GUARDSMEN
(Continued from Page One) -
totalitarian partner, Benito Musso
lini.
“But the weapon which ultimately
will enforce submission of the enemy
is the army,” the spokesman said.
Adding that Britain now has about
3,000,000 men under arms.
Truckload after truckload of mili
tary supplies speeded along coastal
highways of this island kingdom, in
preparation for Hitler’s long-awaited
“der tag.”
The war office has issued new re
striction- against the'wearing of uni
forms by unauthorized persons, pre
sumably to guard against "fifth col
umn” operations; and the admiralty
called for volunteers for the marine
corps.
Noting Cabinet Minister Lord
Beaverbrook’s warning that "the
enemy is making preparations for
the invasion <jif Britain even before
Springtime comes,” observers said the
new threat is particularly grave be
cause the Germans might attempt
either a mass invasion or isolated
raids to relieve the pressure on the
Italians in Albania and Africa.
The moon and tides will favor oith
Five for a foursome—four indi
vidually packaged sets of golf balls
come in a smart case that can serve (
as a gift for the giver!
er invasion or raids from flow v.ntil 1
Christmas, and attackers would have
the benefit of channel fogs and 16
hour-long nights.
CAN’T LOSE THEM
A scarcity of honey-producing
plants in the neighborhood of the
hive will induce bees to travel al
most unbelievable distances, but
each time they return with unerr
ing accuracy to their homes.
The female Bolonesox fish, if
placed in the same tank with him,
usually eats her husband.
\_
sl,. sac -.'
CREEKS FIRE ON
TEPELENI, KUSUR)
(Continued from pagP 0ne)
vise was reported under «
[round Palermo, another 7
ibout six miles below Chirnam
The Greeks said the Italians ha
irought up reinforcements in a7
ermined effort to hold Chima7
)ne motor transport column
jarently bringing up fresh tnl!
ind supplies was heavily borrh'"
•esterday by RAF planes" the Br
sh air command reported "
In the northern sector continu
inowstorms slowed down fi^htm
'Jevertheless Greek advances 17
■eported after local encounters ]
There are 1,024,000 persons .
lame of Johnson in the i
states. Ult«
..nv. -7 ~~
LISTEN to the \
CHRISTMAS MUSIC |
Over A New
SENTINEL RADIO I
NOW IS THE TIME TO BUI i
PAY l A l l lUAI YOUR ( OXVIMI Xd: |
SEE THE 1941 MODEL SENTINEL RADIOS ON DISPLAY
__ ¥
~ ... '*■ ^——i gs i..-- ——— ¥
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♦ 3 Band
♦ Push-Button Tuning
♦ Tone Control
Superlative 2 band
AC-DC MODEL
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8PEN EVENINGS UNTIL 9:00 I
For Christmas Shoppers Convenience §
BUDGET DEPARTMENT §
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$1.25 S
e~:
Wk.
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t SUPER-DELUXE BATTERY RADIO I
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f # Equipped with special Battery If
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t Efficient built-in loop aerial brings in stations |f
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$1.0(1 1
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Hardware
SKATES
$1.35 pr.
ADD THESE ITEMS TO
YODB BUDGET ACCOUNT 1
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Electric Toaster
$1.79
Electric Iron j
„ la
COMBINATION WAFFLE IRON-TOASTER |
(2-in-l) $4.95 Complete » |
CHRISTMAS TREE LIGHTS 1
Set of 8 Vari-Colored Bulbs QA |
Complete—Ready to use. fj &
—v«
MacMILLAN & CAMERON DEPARTMENT |
“ " . ^Sg5|?i

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