OCR Interpretation


The Wilmington morning star. [volume] (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, December 21, 1940, FINAL EDITION, Image 8

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1940-12-21/ed-1/seq-8/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 8

rauni _
| ' j
K
\
'j.
I.—I ■ , '' —
SYNOPSIS
READ THIS FIRST:
GETTING a “break” after a
long attempt to reach the top,
KIT REILLY, young ballad sing
er, is befriended by
VANCE HEALEY, prominent ra
dio sports announcer, who 2
her a trial in the Sembl®r.^°s5 00(j
The prize for the wxnner is $5,000
and a one-year contract to PP
on the Sembler program as
successor of ,
NANA HARRIS, ™ted 8°anngd
stress, who is retiring,
her friend and partner,
FRAN LE MAZE, are slated to
do Lt .-a ■*“%» ”,S
athletic club program. Nana ana
Howard Balch, critic and one of
5e Sembler contest Judges are m
the audience, but do not know Lit
is to appear on the program.
CHAPTER ELEVEN
To three women present in that
hall on that Thanksgiving eve it
was ever to seem more than a
coincidenc e that brought them un
der the same roof, a fate that
crossed the paths of Kit Reilly and
Fran and Nana Harris.
The orchestra struck up a lively
and slightly off-key version of
“Dixie” and the curtains parted
jerkily. The girls picked up the
song and walked hand-in-hand to
the center of the minute platform.
From there they went -to i min
uet in taps which was their double
number. The dance finished, they
bowed off stage.
Kit returned alone, having a lit- ,
tie difficulty in achieving grace
and staying within the radius of a
wavering spotlight. The piano and
violin gave her the opening notes
of “There’s a Girl in the Heart of
Maryland” in a low key. She 6ang
it slowly, huskily and sweetly.
Cheers and stamping feet greet
ed her, but Kit held out her hand
to the wings and Fran came on to
do a solo waltz before Kit joined
her in a second song.
In the third row of the audience,
Nana Harris felt her breath catch
in her throat with wonder. “My
soul and body!” she breathed, so
low that only Howard Balch could
hear her.
“Very nice,” he said.
“W-what?”
“You are.”
“I’m talking about the girl. The
little heart of Maryland.”
“Too skinny,” he replied.
“Take a long look,” she insisted.
He did. “It doesn’t do any good.
Too many clothes.”
“The face!” she whispered wlth
sringly. “Don’t you recognize it?”
Kit was taking a repeat on the
chorus of “Lovely to Look At.”
His face was blank.
“She was the girl on the pro
gram several weeks ago who made
Old Man Sembler cry. Remember?
1 wrote you a note about her. And
look around you . . . they love
her! If I tried to sing an out-dated
number like “Maryland,” I’d get
laughed off the stage.”
“I wonder if we could get a beer
here when this is over.”
Nana clutched his arm. 'Did you
—or didn’t you — say that you
couldn’t remember one contestant
from another?”
"Yes,” he returnee’ calmly, "I
did. But you said you’d take care
3f all that.”
“Howard, do listen carefully to
what I have to say. That young
ster’s got something! Remember
that little paragraph on the pretty
page of instructions the advertis
ing people handed out to us
judges? Remember the one about
‘considering the appeal that would
get through to the universal hu
man heart’?”
He regarded her from a great
height. “Like all artists, you are
t lousy critic,” he said pleasantly.
“And, if I remember correctly,
there were a lot of other things
on your pretty printed page about
tonal perfection, range, register
and all that tripe.”
, “That’s the word,” she agreed,
"Look, Howard, I’m going out tc
my car. I don’t want her to see me,
See if you can fix it to have her
out before I do my stuff.”
She slipped out, only half catch
ing his parting remark about no1
setting her heart on it. The res1
of it had to do with the girl’s no1
having a chance.
* * *
Fran polished the last plate and
put it on a shelf. She covered the
turkey with a large, white napkir
and put it in the window box tha1
served as a refrigerator.
‘‘Well, that’s done. For once 1
feel like I could never eat another
meal. Them Puritans sure had a
swell idea when the figured oul
rhanksgiving. What’ll we do to
night? Play cards or take a
walk?”
The newspaper fell over Kit’s
face. She blinked her sleepy eyes
and picked it up again.
“Maybe we’ll go to the opera
Metzger is singing “Carmen” anc
Mimi Purcell is giving a party ir
ner grandfather’s box in the dia
mond horseshoe. . . Fran, did you
near my social secretary mention
whether or not Mimi had invited
as?”
“No, Your Highness, that must
nave been when my masseur was
nere. And who, if the question
ain’t too personal, is Mimi Pur
nell?”
4 Kit passed the, society page to
Fran, pointing to a picture. “Miss
-roldiocks in the ermine jacket,”
she explained.
“Funny,” Fran said, knitting her
nrow. “I don’t seem to place her.”
“I do. She was one of the con
stants the night I sang on the
Sembler program. She’s a debu
;ante and her father is the utilities
ting.”
“You don’t say! Is that the name
)f a foreign country?”
Kit laughed. “Idiot! Utilities are
hings that people need. Things
laving to do with supplying light,
ind power, and heat, and water.
And when you re a uuuiies King,
you have millions of dollars.”
“Somebody should have told pop.
When he first came from the old
country, he used 1d sell candles
and lamps, and pots and pans.
Utilities, huh?”
Kit regarded the picture thought
fully. “It’s funny the way things
get divided up, and the way peo
ple aren’t satisfied with what
they’ve got. Take this girl . . .
she’s got security and money and
social position, and looks, and a
voice. . . Oh, what chance could
I have against a girl like that?
You can’t win with that kind oi
competition.”
“You must be looking for some
thing to worry about, Kit. Youi
path and hers ain’t ever going tc
cross. *
That was where Fran guessed
wrong.
Kit said, “Oh, well . .
Fran studied the women’s page.
After a moment, her eye rested or
an item and she said, “Turkej
loaf! That’s one I hadn’t though'
of. . . Now, who would that be?’
She demanded, as a sharp rat
sounded on their door.
A boy in uniform said crisply,
“Telegram for Miss Reilly.”
Kit signed the pad he held ou'
I to her. Her fingers were nerveless;
a telegram was an omen of ill
luck. She gave it to Fran.
“Do you mind reading it, Fran?
I—I—don’t like them.”
Fran slit the envelope and read
silently.
"Here,” 6he said, giving it back
to Kit. "I ve gotta find Jake Spivak
and borrow a hundred bucks.”
“A hundred! WHY?”
“Read that, baby, and you’ll
see.”
Kit’s eyes skimmed the mes
sage. At first, the lines seemed to
dance up and down. After a little,
the words fell into place and she
read them slowly, unbelievingly:
The judges of the Sembler
audition program are happy to
inform you that you have been
(Continued on Page Nine)
OUT OUR WAY ■•••w* By J. R. Williams OUR BOARDING HOUSE . , with . . . Major Hoople
BrLLNEVER'Gfr" TH/CT » W YDO DON'T UNDERSTAND \ 1 I JUST RI6KE0 A ^WHEY, SHOAT, YOU CAN'T 00 THAt la'sORRY BUt"m7B£
A GUY THAT OWNS / LIFE, I SEE ~ LISTEN... A , 5Y ’ § BUCK ON THAT CHEESY! TO OLD JAKE—TAKE ONE DIP/BANKROLL’S SMotI'
HAFF TH' COMP’NV ' J / SUV WORKS HARD TILL ' ] I § WHEEL, AND X WANT W AND DUCK SO FAST A TSETSE f JAKE — I OiD A
■ EXPERIMENTIN’ AN' C THAT WORK IS PLAY--BV f M.Y SIX SMACKERS RIGHT) FLY COULDN'T CATCH SO\j!^A LADY GODw/A
wlw TH7KvO^S1JSTD ) ) ScTe^ aJtHaVstUFF / I MOW, NOT TUESDAY!~~J, ANY D YOU OTHER CLERKS # AFTERNOON JJH
TRADE- AsN’ HIM A <( IS WORK TO HIM, SO HE J ys WHAT IF X DIO ONLY JA WANTA GO HOG-WILD WITH/^EVERYTHING T <
MILLIONAIRE/WHV AV NATURALLY WORKS AT / /? PLAY IT ONCE A? A DIME ?—STEP UP, IF C l HAD ON A Hoeet/
_ DID HE WORK SO HARD / ) THE PLAY AND _Z , U |T'S A FREE COUNTRY \l YOUR VEINS AIN'T FULL OF )-^-- E'
~| P( 72-^T, ■?nTr?--T F / f ATJf^ / AIN'T IT?—I'M. \frozen dishwater/ ^
F1UU1
HEART
TROUBLE

m ax
episodes
No. 6
f- -c
eooo-ByE, prentice# )
1^16 IS JUST THE J
BEGINNING! YOU'LL
^HEAgMOgg QE THIS j )
/^e PIRST
RINJC3NJECKED
PHEASANTS
BROU&HT TO THE U-S.
WERE RELEASED OfSI
PROSPECT ISLAND,
NEAR SEATTLE,
BUT NOT A SIN&LE BIRO
OF THIS SHIPMENT
SURVIVED.
BELA LAN AN—COURT REPORTER -Bv L All™
- Founded On Actual Court Records And You Can Be The Judge
~ and no*/, .vue approach the end as dr 17= '
' / PAS9WG THE SOCK, 1
Strange insurance company., argue itodti huh! the company |
Case of |7 . = J says.."see you".
I HAVE NT GOT THE AVAN'5 HEART 1 A^D^U SAY..
fQQ [gOONE • I DON'T KNOW WHERE IT IS J j~\ SEE THEM »
AND !
WZ&STANDISH
SUED THE
INSURANCE
COMPANY
FDR
DAMAGES I
=T
HERE IS
THE
COURTS
DECREE *
WE FIND OUR
VERDICT TO
BE FOR ... m
-'jj
YOU BE
THE JUDGE!
tt/HAT 15 YOUR
OPINION ?
>-1i
HOW WOULD
you DECIDE ?
FOR THE RFAL
DECISION
SEE
PAGE
TEN
r ~ ■"
THIS CURIOUS WORLD
■ —
| THERE WAS NOTHING
| SUPERNATURAL
S IN THE APPEARANCE
I OR
P POPPIES
ON WORLD WAR
BATTLE fields/
i, FOR A\ANY
i CENTURIES,
' THIS PLANT HAS
SPRUNG UP ASA
WEED ON ANV
NEGLECTED LAND
OVER AREAS OF
WESTERN
t EUROPE.
' 1
j
I
!A cowry is a
P -S5£v4 .S^tSSIA.
□ /SV^/Z^Z. G//=Tj
S ** ^ **• —~ —I ,—m-^ r ——
itly used as money in some sections ot
I LITTLE ORPHAN ANNIE ~ **.•?**•• • •' m*.&■<■•***>*'■■■ Feed The Brute
SUREST THING OH. MR. AND^ T YEAH! ^f^OH^TS OUST SAM. f 6HES MY | THATS RIGHT
>ESA X' YOU KNOW. ANNIE- MRS. SLAGG. I | AND THERES | TH* PRESSER - HE’S I MOMMY I BILLY—AND
»PLE IN < BUT ME BUSTIN’ WHO TOOK 11 A GUY IN I O. K.— AND PEG— I AN’ NS BODY I NO DECENT
HAT’LL IN TO SUPPER ME IN-THEY’RE 11 THERE AND I SHE’S LITTLE BILLYS I KIN EVER I PERSON WILL
MK? I MINE—YOU’RE LIKE THIS—WHO LITTLE BILLY'S II ADAME- I MAMA—SHES SWELL- I TAKE ME I EVER TRY
T . A FRIEND O' ARE ALL THOSE GRANDPARENTS- I k. A ISN’T SHE. BILLY? i AWAY FROM I TO - CM ON
ED? MINE TOO. FOLKS-? J IfeiBB s* A HER AGAIN, f UTS GO .
AREN'T YUH? - ^H| ff|l g »| jggag. . Mpd! EVER? Jf IN- yjfl
WASH TUBBS ~ ~ .**, „ Who’s There? ~ By Roy Crane
IT'S A TELEPHONE CALL FROM W0.UE,THE OFFICE BOV, IT'S JUST LIKE X X") SINCE HE HAS NAMED A SUCCESSOR NOT AN ACCIDENT, PERHAPS. A DREADX SHH! '
CHIEF.* DRINKWATER HAS RESIGNED! THE PRODUCTION TOLD VA, CHIEF. DRINK* \ TO OUR LIKINS, COMRADES, WE WILL ILLNESS! OR, EVEN BETTER .../SOMEONE
• MANAGER HAS BEEN NAMED PRESIDENT OF WATER'S PATRIOTIC. HES FIND A MEANS OF DESTROYING THE "-T/----■-'l » AT THE
—-- DRINKWATER AIRCRAFT! NUTS ABOUT AIRPLANES. SUCCESSOR, AS WE DID DRINKWATER!] \ \ DOOR
---*—^-*" HE AIN'T SOWN A LET US - — - _ - ^—\r^
PUN HIS AFFAIRS, NO J L ~ •
MATTER WOT / _ __ , Vf&y FCJ Ufl*',
^HAPPENS! _ 1# HO*
GASOLINE ALLEY, ?<•> * . - •„ Christmas Spirit
ltili uUMrb . ~ ^ The Lesser Of Two Evils? 1
■' I I ■ i i ■ mm » ■ ■ - - - ------- R
RRAI)H)Rp—Seeks the Diamond Doll By William Ritt and Clarence Gray I
DAWN FINDS
BRICKS
FRIENDS
AT THE
RANCH HOUSE
ALARMED
AT
HIS
DISAPPEARANCE
i ir mm uArLUOlUI'J -- , r .klf 9
WE HEARD LAST NI6HT DRY YOUR TEARS, LITTLE ONE' I
HE WILL LIVE TO TASTE MANY I
MORE DANGERS ! Tgjfa I
hi, kid/ wiSm B

xml | txt